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BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY 

IN EGYPT 

AND EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT 
TV'ENTIETH YEAR, 1914 


H A R 


R. ENGELBACH 

* 

inscriptions by 

BATTISCOMBE GUNN 


A G E H 



BY 


LONDON 

BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT 
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, GOWER STREET, W. C. 1 


11 , 


AND 

BERNARD QUARITCH 
GRAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, 


1923 





BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT 
AND EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT 
TWENTIETH YEAR, 1914 


H A R A G E H 

BY 

R. ENGELBACH 

INSCRIPTIONS BY 

BATTISCOMBE GUNN 


LONDON 

BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT 
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, GOWER STREET, W. C. i 

AND 

BERNARD QUARITCH 

11 GRAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, W. 

1923 

X5 



BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT 
AND EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT 

PATRON: 

F.-M. VISCOUNT ALLENBY, G.C.B., G.C.M.G. 


\ 

GENERAL COMMITTEE (*Executive Members) 


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Prof. R. C. Bosanquet 
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Honorary Director — Prof. Flinders Petrie 
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THE EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT 

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James Henry Breasted, Ph.D. 

9 

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Hon. Secretary 

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PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT AND 

BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT 


I. BALLAS, 1895; by J. E. Quibell. (Out of print; obtainable in joint volume NAQADA AND 
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CONTENTS 


HARAGEH 

INTRODUCTION 


SECT. PAGE 

1. The district. i 

2. Personnel. i 

3. Dealers. i 

4. Delay in publication. 1 


CHAPTER I 

THE CEMETERIES OF HARAGEH 


5. Division of Cemeteries. 2 

6. Cemetery . 2 

7. C . 2 

8. Cemeteries D E F. 2 

9. G & H. 2 

10. New Kingdom town site . . 2 

11. Nazlet es Sa'adna ... . 2 

12. Cemetery S & Wadys . ... . 2 

13. Surface indications. 3 

14. Groups of objects. 3 

15. Breakages of the bones. 3 

16. Population in ancient times. 3 


CHAPTER II 

THE POTTERY AND BEAD CORPORA 


17. Lack of recorded dynastic combinations . 4 

18. Corpus uniform with that of Riqqeh ... 4 

19. Predynastic corpus.. 4 

20. Dynastic corpus.. . 5 

21. Provisional bead corpus . . :.. . 5 


CHAPTER III 

THE PREDYNASTIC CEMETERIES & THEIR 
OBJECTS 


22. Cemetery G . 6 

23. H. 6 


SECT. PAGE 

24. Sequence dating. 6 

25. Range compared with Gerzeh. 7 

26. One protodynastic grave .. 7 

27. Pangraves ? 7 

28. Plate XXV . 7 

29. Plate XXIX. 7 


CHAPTER IV 

THE OLD KINGDOM AND FIRST INTERMEDIATE 
GRAVES & OBJECTS 


30. Date of the cemeteries. 7 

31. References to similar pottery. 8 

32. Plates V, VII & VIII. 8 

33. Plate IX . . . 9 

3 4 . Plates XIV & XXII. 9 

3 5 . Plates XXIII & XXV .. . 9 


CHAPTER V 

THE MIDDLE KINGDOM GRAVES, SHERD 
. DEPOSITS & OBJECTS 

36. Date of the cemeteries & notes on pottery 9 

37. Range of dates. 10 

38. Bead collars. 10 

39. 'Tell-el-Yehudiyeh’ pottery. 10 

40. Other foreign pots... . 10 

41. The sherd deposits . . .. 10 

42. Town site probatly elsewhere. n 

43. Probable date of sherd deposits. 11 

44. Objects on PI. VII. 11 

45. Flail beads on PI. X. n 

46. Foreign pottery PI. X. ix 

47. PI. XI.. . ix 

48. Pis. XII & XIII . n 

49. Group 112 n 

50. Cylinder amulets (amulet cases). 12 

51. PI. XIV .. 12 

52. PI. XVI.. /.. 12 

53. PI. XVII. 12 






















































VI 


CONTENTS 


SECT. PAGE 

54. PI. XVII other objects . 12 

55. Wooden statuettes of man & woman ... 12 

56. Stone statuettes. i 3 

57. Grave 354 group. i 3 

58. Grave 154 group. i 3 

59. Amulets PI. XXII, 4, & XII dyn. mirrors 

PI. XXII . i 3 

60. Plates XXIV & XXV . i 3 


CHAPTER VI 

SPECIAL GRAVES & TOMBS 


61. Grave 401; predyn. i 3 

62. 460; 14 

63 . 470; .. . 14 

64. Tomb 99: Old Kingdom. 14 

65. 671, 672; Old Kingdom. 14 

66. Grave 651; Old Kingdom. 14 

67. Tomb 72; M. K. 14 

68 . 92 15 

69. Jewellery tomb, 124; M. K. 15 

70. Tomb 128; M. K.. . 16 

71. 211: .*. 16 

72. 264; 16 

73. Xlth dynasty house . 16 


CHAPTER VII 

THE NEW KINGDOM SITES & OBJECTS 


74. The North of Harageh town site. 17 

75. Intruded graves... 17 

76. Other cemeteries . 17 

77. Objects on Pis. X, XII & XXII. 18 


CHAPTER VIII 

SCARABS 


78. Dating of scarabs .. 18 

79. Scarabs, PI. XXI, 1—7. 18 


SECT. PAGE 

80. Scarabs, PI. XX & XXI, 8 —hi .... 19 

81. New Kingdom scarabs. 20 


CHAPTER IX 

THE HIEROGLYPHIC AND HIERATIC 
INSCRIPTIONS 

82. Introductory- remarks. 20 

83 . Painted tomb of Hari-shaf-nakht. 20 

84. Ukh(t)hotep. 22 

85. Coffin of Senusert-onkh .. 23 

86. Painted coffin, tomb 347. 24 

87. Inscriptions from various coffins. 24 

88. Canopic boxes, tombs 250 & 280. 26 

89. Stele of Nebpu. 26 

90. another (?) Nebpu. 27 

91. Haremhab. 27 

92. Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb. 27 

g 3 . Itenhab. 28 

94. Kenemsu & Seruket. 29 

95. Renef-sonb. 29 

96. Thayt (?) and Tiuy (?). 29 

97. Canopic jars. 29 

98. Small objects .. 29 

99. Pots bearing religious texts. 3 o 

100. Pot inscriptions and ostraca. 32 

101. Papyri .. 32 


CHAPTER X 

THE COPTIC & GREEK STELES 


102. Coptic stele of Phibamftn . 33 

10 3 . Greek stele of Phoebammdn . 33 

104. Coptic stele of Sapiti.: . . . 33 


INDEX 

TO TEXT, NAMES AND TITLES. 


% 





















































LIST OF PLATES 

WITH PAGE REFERENCES TO THE DESCRIPTIONS 


NOTE: Tabular lists of graves shewing the cemetery, size of grave, and every object occuring in each, are given on the following 
plates: Predynastie, Protodynastie and pangrave (?) PI. LV; Old Kingdom & First Intermediate Period Pis. LVI, LVII; 
Middle Kingdom Pis. LVIII—LXH; New Kingdom PI. LXIII. 


HARAGEH 

PLATE PAGES 

I. Wooden statuettes, Tomb 262 .... 12 

II. Map of district ... 2-4 

III. Cemeteries A&F . 2 

IV. Cemetery B . . . .. 2 

V. Cemeteries C, E & G. 2 

VI. Burials; nos. 1-5 .. 14 

„ nos. 6 14-20 

VII. Flints; nos. 1-7 . . ... 7 

„ nos. 8-11 . . . . 11 

VIII. Headrests ...... . 8 

IX. Groups of Vlth dynasty. 9 

X. Groups and foreign pottery: 

no. 1. 11 

nos. 2-6. 18 

nos. 4, 5, i 3 & 15. 17 

no. 7 ..: . 14 

nos. 9, 11, 12 . . ..10, 11 

no. 10 .. 18 

no. 14 . . .. 15 

XI. Potmarks, XII dynasty. 10 

Group 530. 17 

XII. Potmarks & owner’s marks: 

nos. 3 i & 37. 18 

remainder. 10 

XIII. Plans of graves.1 3 , 14, 15, 16 

Xiy. Groups, XI & XII dynasty.12, ij6 

nos. i 3 & 14. 9 

XV. Tomb 1.24, XII dynasty.15, 16 

XVI. Stele, Tomb 124, no. 1.12, 28, 29 

remainder. 16 

XVII. Miscellaneous objects .. 12 


PLATE PAGES 

XVIII. Wooden statuettes. 12 

XIX. Stone statuettes.i3, 29 

XX. Scarabs, Old & Middle Kingdom . 18-20 

XXI. Scarabs, New Kingdom.17, 20 

XXII. Groups of beads: nos. 1, 2, 4 & 5 . . 9, i3 

no. 3 . 18 

no. 4 (Old Kingdom) 9 

XX 5 H. Copper mirrors & tools: nos. 1-7 . 9, i3 

nos. 8-12, 14 & 17 ..i5 ; 16 

nos. i 3 . 16 

nos. 15 & 16 . . . .... i3 

XXIV. Steles, Xllth dynasty. . 26, 27 

XXV. Vases and dyad: nos. 1-7. 7, 14 

nos. 8, 9, 11 & 12. 9, i3 

nos. 12-15 • - • -. i3 


XXVI-XXVIII. Predyn. pottery, PI. LV, 8, 9 

XXIX. Decorated pottery. .7 

XXX. Protodyn. & Pangrave pottery . . 9 

XXXI-XXXIII. Old Kingdom &I st Inter- 

mediate pottery, Pis. LVI, LVII, 5-8 
XXXIV -XLI. Middle Kingdom pottery, 

Pis. LVIII -LXII. 5 

XLII-XLV. New Kingdom pottery, 


PI. LXIII. 5 

XLVI. Predyn. and M. K. stone vases . 7,16 
XLVII. Middle Kingdom stone vases . . 16 

XLVIII. New Kingdom stone vases .... 17 

XLIX. Old Kingdom & I st Intermediate 

beads. 8, 9 

L-LIII. Middle Kingdom beads.10-16 

LIV. New Kingdom beads.. . 17 

LV. Predynastie tomb-registers .... 6, 7 
















































VIII 


LIST OF PLATES 


PLATE PAGES 

LVI-LVII Old Kingdom tomb-registers 8, 9 
LVIII-LXII. Middle Kingdom tomb- 

registers . 10-16 

LX.IIL New Kingdom tomb-registers . . 17 

LXIV. Inscriptions from Canopic boxes . 26 

LXV. Inscriptions &c. from coffins before 

Middle Kingdom.. 24, 25 

LXVI. List of offerings: Tomb 87. 25 

LXVII. Tomb of Ukht-Hotep, 672 . . 14,22 

LXVIII. Tomb of Hari-shaf-nakht 671 . . 14, 20 
LXIX. Painted coffin, name unknown . . 24 


PLATE 

LXX. Coffin of Senusert-onkh, 250 . . . 

LXXI. Stele of Neb-pu. 

LXXII. Steles of Neb-pu, Har-em-Hab, &c. 
LXXIII. Stele of It-na-neb-ten (Itenhab) . . 
LXXIV. Inscriptions of Seneny & steles . . 
LXXV. Inscriptions XII dynaasty ... 15, 

LXXVI. Latter steles. 

LXXVII. Inscriptions from coffins, &c. . . . 
LXXVIII-LXXX. Ink inscriptions from 

pottery.. 

LXXXI. Names and Titles (see after index) 


PAGES 

23 

26 

27 

28 
25,29 
25 , 29 

29, 33 
24, 25 

3 0, 32 


W 











HARAGEH 


INTRODUCTION. 

1. This volume is the result of the excavations 
undertaken by the British School of Archaeology 
in Egypt on the S. W. half of the Gebel Abusir, a 
piece of desert entirely surrounded by cultivation 
lying at the entrance to the Fayyum. This half 
is known locally as the Gebel et-Toha or “Desert 
of losing one's way ” owing to the fact that the 
villages around it look so much alike when tra¬ 
velling across it. It has been decided to give the 
name Harageh to the volume as the name Gebel 
Abusir occurs in several other places in Egypt; 
El-Harageh is the village nearest to which our 
huts were built, and the largest cemeteries were 
found. 

I had previously noted the site when on a pro¬ 
specting trip with our head workman, Aly es-Suefi, 
in 1912. 

2. I arrived at El-Harageh at the end of Oc¬ 
tober, iqi 3 and was joined a few weeks later by 
Mr. Guy Brunton, Mr. Battiscombe Gunn and the 
late Mr. Duncan Willey, who had come out to 
study with the British School. We worked together 
till Prof. Flinders Petrie arrived at Lahun Pyramid, 
where I had built huts for him. He took Mr. Brun¬ 
ton to the Pyramid, leaving Mr. Gunn and Mr. Willey 
with me. We were joined later by Mr. F. P. Frost 
who undertook the storing and packing.of all the 
objects found, thus relieving me of a thankless job 
which takes up a good deal of time. Each member 
of my party made a stay at Lahun and Mr. Gunn 
took over the management of the camp for a fort¬ 
night while I finished a small cemetery at Riqqeh 
which I had been obliged to leave in 1912. The 
results of this are incorporated in Riqqeh and Mem¬ 
phis VI. Mr. Gunn also undertook the translation 
and copying of all the inscriptions, which he deals 
with in Chapter IX. All three of us took a share 
in the recording of the graves and the drawing 


of the pottery, etc., while I am responsible for their 
present arrangement in this volume. 

The excavating was done by about 40 of our 
old Qufti workmen, and the heavy work by locals 
from the neighbouring villages. Labour was plenti¬ 
ful, as some of qur permanent workmen come from 
Lahun, and could therefore choose men whb would 
work well. At the conclusion of Mr. J. de M. John¬ 
son’s Roman excavations, I employed some of his 
permanent workmen, for which I wish to express 
my thanks; the men were well trained and gave 
no trouble whatever, and I should like to employ 
them under the same circumstances in coming 
seasons. 

3 . The plague of dealers was worse here than 
at imy place I have worked: the nuisance got to 
such a pitch that I had a trustworthy boy per¬ 
manently employed to watch every incoming train 
and keep the dealers in sight until I could put 
pressure on them to leave the district. The dealers 
have made fearful havoc of Gurob where there 
was still much to be found. 

4. The delay in the appearance of this volume 
is due to the fact that for five years after the out- 
break of war nearly all the party were on active 
service; August 1914 found it in its very earliest 
stages; and before we were able to resume our 
work on the volume, all the objects had been dis¬ 
persed to various museums, thus rendering a final 
check, before going to press, impracticable. It is 
to this that any otherwise avoidable errors must 
be attributed. I have lately been able to confer 
with Mr. Brunton and Mr. Gunn, but Mr. Willey, 
I regret to say, was treacherously murdered by 
his Kurdish guides in Mesopotamia shortly after 
the armistice. 

My thanks are due to Miss M. A. Murray for 
drawing the scarabs and glazes, to Mrs. Petrie for 
drawing the decorated pottery shown on PI. XXIX, 
to Mrs. Brunton for the drawing of the wooden 


2 THE CEMETERIES OF HARAGEH 

statuette on PI. XXVII, and to Prof. Petrie for Vlth to the end of the First Intermediate Period 


giving’ me such a free hand in the excavations, 
and for his help and guidance whenever I have 
asked for it. 

CHAPTER I 

THE CEMETERIES OF HARAGEH. 

5. The graves of Harageh are divided into i 3 
groups, indicated on the map of the district, PI. II, 
by: A—H, NH, W i; W 2 , S, and NZ. 

Cemetery A, Pis. II and III, consisting of io 3 gra¬ 
ves, lay on a slight ridge about a mile S. of the 
village of Harageh. It appears to consist almost 
exclusively of XII dyn. shaft-tombs of the time Of 
Senusert II — Amenemhet III. All had been anci¬ 
ently robbed. It was in this cemetery the inlaid 
silver jewellery was found. 

6. Cemetery B, Pis. II and IV, lay about half a 
mile to the S. W. of cemetery A. It was exclusively 
filled with shaft-tombs, only one of which was 
dated, the king being Senusert III. I am inclined 
to think that, as a whole, the cemetery covers a 
later period than cemetery A, from the scarabs 
and pots, especially the foreign pottery PI. X Nos. 
8—12, and the black, white-incised “Tell el Yahu- 
diyeh” ware which was found in this cemetery, 
and which did not occur in cemetery A. Although 
the Tell el-Yahudiyeh ware is well-known in the 
Xllth dynasty (see Kahun Gurob and Hawara, 
PI. XXVII, No. 202), and even in the Xlth (see 
No. 530, M. K. registers in this volume, and sec¬ 
tion 73), it has not tO my knowledge been hitherto 
found in graves of the Xllth dynasty. One would 
expect to find it in town sites, before overcoming 
the conservative ideas as regards tomb pottery, 
well marked in this dynasty (see graves 297,326, 
327 and 354.) Some of the tombs had been re-used 
in the XVIIIth dynasty (see section 75). 

7. Cemetery C, PI. V, consists of three groups 
of graves (C i; C 2 , C 3 ) some of which might be of 
the Vlth dynasty, but many seem to lie between 
the IVth—Xth dynasties (see chap. IV). The shaft 
tombs had loculi on the E. and W. and several 
painted and inscribed coffins which are dealt with 
by Mr. Gunn in chap. IX. 

8. Cemetery D is on the South-East side of the 
Gebel Abusir near Dandyl, and consists of a small 
cemetery on the edge of the desert near the point 
marked D on PI. II. This cemetery is of two dates; 
the lower graves are almost certainly from the 


and above them Coptic burials. No shaft-tombs 
were found in this cemetery, neither were there 
an y graves of any other period; it was here that 
“button-seal” burials occurred together with graves 
having the curious symmetrical Neb and Red Crown 
scarabs discussed in sec. 79. 

Cemetery E (PI. V) lay between cemetery A 
and B, and may possibly be slightly earlier than 
cemetery A; the pottery, however, is by no means 
characteristic. 

Cemetery F (PI. Ill) is on a high ridge running 
along by the cultivation North-Eastwards from 
cemetery G, from which it is separated by a wady 
(marked as Wady II). The tombs were mostly of 
the Xllth dynasty, and so deep were many of the 
shafts that their chambers were flooded by the 
rise in the water level of later times. 

9. Cemetery G (PI. V) is a small very crowded 
predynastic cemetery of about S.D. 58. (See chap.III.) 

Cemetery H lies about a mile S.W. of cemetery G; 
it also consists of predynastic graves overlaid with 
a New Kingdom village side. It is probably of 
slightly longer range , of period than cemetery G. 

10. NH. is the New Kingdom village-site lying 
to the N. E. of Harageh village. The graves were 
very scattered, and the village had in some cases 
encroached upon the cemetery. A feature Of this 
village-site was a series of large pottery drain pipes 
leading to a circular stone basin. 

11. Cemetery NZ. includes all the graves round, 
and to the N. of the village of Nazlet es-Sa'adna. 
They consisted of Xllth, XVIIIth and XIXth 
dynasty graves with a very few of the XXIIIrd 
—XXVth dynasties. The graves were very scat¬ 
tered and badly robbed in ancient times, and I 
have only included a few New Kingdom groups 
in the tomb-registers (one dated to Ramessu I), 
which I think are reliable. 

12. Cemetery S. includes all the tombs lying 
round the South-west end of the Gebel. They are 
mostly large isolated Xllth dynasty shafts. All 
the dated ’tombs are of Senusert III and Amenem¬ 
het III, but some appear to be later than that. 

V%dy I and Wady II are two series of shallow 
graves packed tightly into the soft sand between 
cemeteries A and F and F and G respectively. 
They appear to have been the graves of the poorer 
classes from the time of Senusert II down to the 
end of the Hyksos period. They were packed as 
closely as possible, and I have had to omit showing 





THE PLUNDERING OF TOMBS 


3 


many groups of pottery and beads, as, in some 
cases, it was not possible to separate the burials. 
A small quantity of objects of the XVIIIth to 
XXIIIrd dynasties were found in these cemeteries. 

A few graves marked SH. came from scattered 
burials just South of the village of Harageh. 

1 3 . The Gebel Abusir, before work was begun 
on it, showed surprisingly few surface indications, 
with the exception of two large deposits of pottery 
and rubbish between cemeteries A and C (PI. II) 
of the Xllth dynasty. These deposits are discussed 
in section 41, and, as I noticed at my first visit, 
consisted of typical town-rubbish, the pottery being 
mostly fragments of the large natron-jars of the 
type 67 c (PI. XXXIX) which, as far as my ex¬ 
perience goes, very rarely occur in graves. 

Up to the moment of starting the digging, I was 
rather doubtful of the existence of anything like 
an extensive necropolis, as, at Kafr Ammar, Atfih, 
Riqqeh and other sites where I have worked, the 
cemeteries have been plentifully besprinkled with 
scraps of pottery, chips, etc. The reason for their 
absence here seems to be that modern plunderers 
had not touched the site, and the anciently robbed 
graves were nearly all large shafts which, as I 
point out below, were plundered without bringing 
the pottery to the surface. The poorer graves were 
mostly untouched. 

14. This brings us to the question as to how far 
we can accept the groups of pottery, etc. from 
robbed tombs as being of one date. The first 
robbery, no doubt, was carried out surreptitiously 
by the cemetery-guardians by night, if the tomb 
was known to contain valuables (cf. Engelbach, 
Riqqeh and Memphis VI; chap. IX.) Knowing where 
the valuables lay, they would not need to turn over 
all the contents of the tomb. There is no doubt, 
however, that at Harageh, there has been a second 
plundering of all the large shaft-tombs by those 
who were unaware of their contents. The method 
of these plunderers would be exactly that employed 
by us today. The shaft and the top layers of one 
of the chambers would be cleared out, the filling 
being brought to the surface, and the remainder 
of the contents of the chamber would then be put 
in the shaft and the filling of the other chambers 
put into the one last cleared. This is the simplest 
method of working out a tomb, and does not in¬ 
volve the necessity of bringing anything, to the 
surface except the objects to be taken away. We 
are certain that the shaft-tombs, especially in ceme¬ 


tery A, were robbed in this manner, as there were 
no scraps of pottery at all on the surface. 

It is a remarkable fact that, in the cemeteries 
South of Harageh, no objects were found in the 
robbed tombs of a later period than the original 
burial, such as water jars, braziers, etc., which the 
plunderers might be expected to leave behind them. 
I except, of course, the intruded New Kingdom 
burials in cemeteries B, C ancj E. 

I therefore consider that we may, in most cases, 
accept the groups of pottery, stone vases and amu¬ 
lets found in the chambers of robbed tombs as 
being of one date. I have however rejected many 
groups from the cemeteries N. Harageh, and Nazlet 
es-Sa'adna owing to intruded burials, when the 
intruded burial was likely to be confused with the 
original burial. 

The steles were nearly all found high in the filling 
of the shafts, and cannot be accepted as evidence that 
they belong to the grave. As to the superstructure 
of the Xllth dyn. shaft-tombs, there can have been 
no elaborate brickwork, as this would have left a 
discoloration on the surface, easily recognizable, 
as we have observed at Lahun and Gurob, after 
the bricks had disappeared. There seems to me 
no question but that the steles were nearly always 
on the surface (see section 90: “every priest . . 
who may pass ... in faring northwards or south¬ 
wards ... ye shall say: etc.”). So we may assume 
that they were embedded in or supported by a 
small mastaba of brick. In the later plundering 
the steles would get broken and flung down any 
half-opened shaft, with the result that fragments 
of the same stele could be found in the shafts of 
different tombs ( cf ’ Renef-Sonb, sect. 95). It is 
likely that all the tombs had steles, but that those 
which were not quickly buried have, at one time 
or another, found their way to the local villages 
to serve as thresholds, lintels and building stone. 

15. It is noteworthy that, in many shaft-tombs, 
the skull was the only part of the body not smashed 
into small pieces. I can give no explanation of this 
fact, as I do not think that the delicate zygomatic 
processes and the orbital margins are less liable 
to breakage, in the turning over of the grave by 
plunderers, than the femora, tibiae and pelvis. 
It seems possible that the breakage of the bones 
and the sparing of the skulls was deliberate. I can 
give no suggestions as to the reason for this. 

16. Judging from the cemeteries, the district had 
a sparse population up to the Vlth dynasty. There 



4 


THE POTTERY AND BEAD CORPORA 


appears to have been a slight increase in the First 
Intermediate Period perhaps owing to the rise of 
Ehnasya, but the building of the pyramid of Lahun 
by Senusert II, involving the founding of the town 
we know as Kahun, gave the district a population 
out of all proportion to its natural importance. 
This density of population seems to have continued 
down to the time of Amenemhet III, possibly owing 
to the influence of work at Hawara. 

Although graves, which must be placed in the 
Second Intermediate Period are found on the South¬ 
west side of the Gebel Abusir, they are by no 
means numerous, and the population seems to have 
kept at a low ebb until the rise of the town of 
Gurob under Thutmose III, and the founding of a 
fair-sized XVIIIth dynasty village North-east of 
El Harageh of which only the foundations now 
remain, having been used for sabakh and bricks 
by the Arabs. 

It seems possible that the scarcity of XIXth dy¬ 
nasty graves is due to the land having, at this 
period, been divided up into large estates. We 
know, from recent work at Gurob (1920) that 
Prince Pa-Ramessu, heir of Sety I was buried at 
Gurob, together with many rich nobles of his time; 
it seems probable that he owned vast estates here 
with head quarters near Gurob. At all events, very 
few graves of the XIXth dynasty are found at 
Harageh, and nothing which could be called a 
cemetery until Coptic times. 

It is of interest, in view of recent excavations 
completing the examination of the cemeteries of 
the entrance into the Fayum, to indicate the po¬ 
sitions of cemeteries of the various dynasties. 


Date 

Predynastic 
1st—IVth 
Vth—Xlth 
Xllth 

XHIth—XVIIth 
XVIIIth 
Ramessu II 
XXth—XXVIth 
Ptolemaic 
Coptic and Roman 


Cemetery at 

Harageh 

Lahun and Gurob 
Harageh and Gurob 
Lahun and Harageh 
Gurob and Harageh 
Gurob and Harageh 
Gurob 
Lahun 

Gurob and Lahun 
Gurob, Lahun and Harageh 


CHAPTER n 

THE POTTERY AND BEAD CORPORA. 

17 . IT seems most desirable, in dealing with such 
a large number of graves, that a tabular system 


be adopted so that any occurrence of one class 
of object with another can be quickly determined. 
Hitherto in most of the publications I have read 
which deal with excavations it has been the cus¬ 
tom to record minutely every combination of pot¬ 
tery, beads, amulets, bronze, etc., occurring in pre¬ 
dynastic and protodynastic graves, while the dy¬ 
nastic combinations with a few notable exceptions 
seem to be totally neglected. This is a pity, as 
there are many periods in Egyptian history on 
which a great deal more information is needed. 
It does not follow that, because few definite de¬ 
ductions can be drawn from the records of com¬ 
binations occurring in one locality, that nothing 
can be made of several such records dealing with 
a particular date. 

I am aware that some excavators are minutely 
recording dynastic combinations of pottery and, 
possibly, beads, but their results are not published, 
so that an excavator must start his classifications 
from the beginning. Since such information is not 
added to the common store, it only remains to 
throw one’s results into the hoards of others, and 
to hope that a complete corpus will appear in due 
course. 

18. In the case of the pottery published in Riqqeh 
I endeavoured to make a temporary corpus of the 
Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom pottery, leav¬ 
ing spaces for other types which might occur, and 
for those already published by the British School 
of Archaeology in Egypt. The pottery of Hara¬ 
geh has therefore been brought into line with the 
Riqqeh pottery with the exception of a few types 
of which it has been necessary to change the 
numbers. These are: 

Xllth dynasty 


Riqqeh 

Harageh 

3 b 

— 

I2i 

2 j 

56u 

5^g 

59n 

58k 

5 »t 

580, 


Note: The quality of the various types of Middle 
Kingdom and XVIIth—XVIIIth pots are given at 
the foot of pi. XLI. 

19. In the case of the predynastic pottery, 
(Pis. XXVI—XXIX), the Harageh pottery has 
been incorporated into the University College pre¬ 
dynastic pottery corpus by Prof. Petrie, which is 
now published. 



FORMS OF AMULETS 


5 


The sequence dating is placed at the bottom 
right-hand corner of the drawing, and the ceme¬ 
tery and the tomb number in the left-hand bottom 
corner. In cases where the pot occurs more than 
twice the tomb number is left out (to avoid crowd¬ 
ing); the tombs in which it occurs can be easily 
found on the predynastic tomb register, PI. LV. 
When the pot has no grave number it is noted 
as N. N. For the sake of economy in space, the 
i st Dynasty and Pangrave (?) pottery have been 
put in one plate (PI. XXX), although the periods 
are not connected. 

20. The Old Kingdom pottery drawings, Plates 
XXXI—XXXIII, have not been arranged in Cor¬ 
pus form, owing to lack of published material, but 
have been numbered consecutively. As with the 
predynastic pottery, the cemeteries are shewn on 
the left-hand bottom corner, and, in cases where 
there is a fairly clear reference to dated tombs in 
other publications, the dynasty is put on the right 
bottom corner. (Since this a corpus of VI—Xth 
pottery has been formed at Sedment, and the 
relative ages of many of the types here are stated 
at the foot of PI. XXXIII. F. P.) 

The Middle Kingdom pottery, Pis. XXXIV-— 
XLI being chiefly Xllth dynasty, but including 
also that of the few graves of the Xlth and the 
Xlllth—XVIth, are dealt with in the tomb registers, 
Pis. LVIII—LXIII. All definitely dated pots have 
the date entered against the pot. 

The New kingdom pottery, Pis. XLII—XLV, 
refers to the registers on PI. LXIV, and is treated 
in the same way as the Middle Kingdom pottery. 
Dates in brackets after the pots shew of what 
period they are characteristic. • 

The stone vases Pis. XLVI—XLVIII are divided 
in the same period as the pottery, and are num¬ 
bered consecutively, with the exception of the 
predynastic stone vases; the numbers given on the 
predynastic vases are those of the types in Pre¬ 
historic Egypt, Corpus of pottery. 

The divisions into periods has been made accord¬ 
ing to pottery types, there being an almost com¬ 
plete break between the Old Kingdom types and 
the Middle Kingdom types, only one grave (192) 
spanning the gap between the two periods. Grave 
190, which has been grouped into the Old King¬ 
dom, is another of doubtful period, as the pots 
have no other counterparts in Harageh. The loculus 
type of chamber is almost characteristic of the 
pre-XIIth period, but the pottery resembles the 


Xllth dynasty rather than the pre-XIIth types. 
I should put this at the Xth—Xlth dynasty and 
grave 192 as Xlth. The division between the 
Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom occurs some¬ 
where in the “Hyksos” period, but I should not 
like to say where, as the Xllth dynasty pottery 
types are very persistent, and no great change 
occurs until well into XVIIIth dynasty. 

2i. I have endeavoured to treat the varieties of 
beads in exactly the same way as the pottery is 
treated, dividing them into groups, each having a 
number, and each member of the group having a 
letter. The plate on which the beads for any par¬ 
ticular grave will be found is shewn at the top of 
the bead list in each tomb register. An awkward 
question arose in dealing with the beads as to the 
desirability of including amulets in the bead corpus, 
the primary use of an amulet being for protection 
and the bead for adornment; as at all periods they 
have almost standardised forms, the hawk-amulet, 
for instance, occurring in such profusion merely 
as a bead. I have therefore included all amulets 
of common occurrence, leaving unique ones to be 
dealt with, as far as possible, in the photograph 
plates. Since no complete record of beads has yet 
been, published for a dynastic cemetery, I have 
given them provisional group numbers as follows, 
incorporating all periods together which are re¬ 
presented separately on the plates. 


Human Forms 

1 

Whorl shells 

36 

Ape 

2 

Bolt 

37 

Duck 

3 

“Uzat” (eye of 


Hawk 

5 

Horus) 

38 

Jackal 

7 

Lotus 

39 

Hippopotamus 

9 

Degraded forms I, 


Lion 

10 

(longitudinally 


Double Lion-head 

11 

bored) 

4 i 

Hare 

12 

Degraded forms II, 


Crocodile 

i 3 

(transversely 


Turtle 

15 

bored) 

42 

Frog 

r 7 • 

Pendants 

44 

Fish 

19 

Ribbed beads 

47 

Fly 

22 

Crumb beads 

50 

Beetle (exluding 


Cartonnage beads, 


“scarabs”) 

2 .4 

(stuck on to plaster) 52 

Heart 

26 

Boss beads, 


Hornet (?) 

27 

(flat on one side) 

54 

Hand 

28 

Multiple beads 

55 

Leg 

3 o 

Button Seals 

57 

Flat-Shells 

32 

Miscellaneous 

58 

Cowries 

34 

Flail beads, (“rope”) 

60 


6 


THE PREDYNASTIC CEMETERIES G AND H AND THEIR 


Flail beads, (knots) 61 
Collar beads, 

(spacers) 63 

Collar beads, 

(End pieces) 64 

Collar beads, 

(Drops) 65 

Cylinders 68 

Drop beads 70 

Barrels 73 


Flattened Barrels, 

• (elliptical section) 74 
Axle Barrels 75 

Lipped Barrels 76 
Spheroids 7g 

Flattened spheroids 80 
Ring beads 85 

Ridged beads 86 

Wafer beads 87 

Disc beads Q2 


These groups call for little explanation, as the 
differences will be readily seen on looking through 
the bead corpus. Some of the animal forms are 
doubtful, and have been included as degraded 
forms. 

It may be remarked that the open-hand amulet 
occurs in all three periods, although the Vlth dy¬ 
nasty form is quite characteristic. I believe this 
is the first appearance in the Middle Kingdom. 
The pottery with it (see grave 6a3, PI. LXII) is 
quite typical Middle Kingdom, although it may 
be later than the Xllth dynasty. The leg which 
occurs so commonly with the hand in V—Vlth 
graves does not occur in later periods at Harageh 
or anywhere else I believe. 

A very fine heart amulet in porphyry is seen on. 
PI. L No. 26 m. This is the only example I know 
in the Xllth dynasty, and it is dated to Amenem- 
h6t III. Another new type of bead to me is the 
carnelian imitation of a flat pierced double-shell 
(PI. L, No. 32 e), although the form 32 c in shell is 
well known. Another curious point is that the IJzat 
eye does not occur at all in the New Kingdom, 
XVII-XXth dyn. graves of Harageh. 

The Button Seals are each of known forms which 
may be seen in the University College collection. 

The predynastic beads have been put out of 
order on PI. LIII for economy in space. 

CHAPTER III 

THE PREDYNASTIC CEMETERIES G AND H 
AND THEIR OBJECTS. 

22. CEMETERY G lay to the N. E. of cemetery C 
about 3 / + mile from it. The graves were packed 
very tightly together on the S. side of a steep 
ridge, which runs along the edge of the Gebel 
Abusir nearly up to Harageh. I cannot understand 
why these graves were so tightly packed, as there 
were plenty of sites with precisely similar pebbly 


OBJECTS 

ground, to say nothing of harder soil in cemetery A 
and softer in Wady I and II. 

Out of perhaps 3 o graves which this cemetery 
contained, in only eight were the bodies sufficiently 
preserved to be able to determine their position. 
In 6 cases the head was to the South, and in two 
cases the head was to the North. Six of these lay 
on the right side and two on the left (see PI. LV, 
columns 5, 6 and 7). The body lay in a fully con¬ 
tracted attitude, but the limbs do not appear to 
have been forced'into an unnaturally tight position 
before burial, as has been observed in Tarkhan. 
(See Petrie, Tarkhan II, PI. X, type 1.) 

23 . Cemetery H lay under part of a small XVIIIth 
dynasty village site about 1 mile S. of cemetery A. 
Many groups have had to be rejected in tabulation 
owing to the extremely close manner in which the 
graves were packed. Three graves were untouched, 
two being head to South, and one head to North; 
all the bodies lay on their left sides in a position 
similar to those of cemetery G. 

A very considerable quantity of pottery was 
found in these cemeteries, of which the types P8op, 
F 83 m, Fgig, and Fgin are quite new forms; ("see 
PI. LV). V 

No cases of dismemberment, no bodies of child¬ 
ren, no ashes, and no traces of clothing were found 
in either cemetery. With regard to the clothing, 
the nature of the soil at Harageh is not very 
suitable for the preservation of either cloth, or 
woodwork. 

24. The pottery has been compared with that of 
Naqada, Diospolis, Mahasna, Gerzeh, and Nubia, 
and the sequence datings are given (as far as 
possible) to those Harageh pots which accord with 
those already dated. From these the sequence 
dating has been stated for each grave. The new 
varieties of pottery thus could be given provisionally 
the sequence dating of the graves in which they 
were found. On comparing the graves in which 
any particular new variety of pot is found, the 
provisional sequence dating for the pot can be 
either given a wider or a narrower range, to meet 
all the graves in which it occurs. The sequence 
dating has been entered at the right bottom corner 
of each pot. 

Practically no alteration has had to be made to 
the sequence datings already published, except 
that in the types L46m and L47C the s. d. must 
certainly be put back to 60-66 and 61—66 re¬ 
spectively. 


PREDYNASTIC TOMBS 


7 


It will be noticed that the forked lances, the 
ripple flaked flints, the incised polished red pots 
P76, P77k and P8op, and the corrugated black 
polished pottery F 83 m n, are peculiar to cemetery H, 
whereas the wavy-handled pottery W, and the flat 
bottomed vases R26a and 34a, are peculiar to 
cemetery G. 

Decorated pottery is found in both cemeteries. 

25. Since the above objects occur so rarely, 
(both these cemeteries being very small), it is 
hardly justifiable to deduce much as to the differ¬ 
ence in age of the two cemeteries, but it is possible 
that cemetery H covers a slightly larger period 
than cemetery G. The period 55—58 covers both 
cemeteries; these might well be a temporary ex¬ 
tension of the population found at the Gerzeh 
cemetery (see Petrie and Wainwright, The Labyrinth, 
Gerzeh and Mazghuneh), the age of the Gerzeh ceme¬ 
tery extending beyond either limit of these ceme¬ 
teries. Gerzeh is only 10 miles away from Harageh. 

A curious point of the predynastic cemeteries 
of Harageh is that no slate palettes occured in 
them, although they were very common in Gerzeh; 
further, the beads at Harageh were very few and 
poor, in contrast to Gerzeh. 

The tight crowding of the burials is curious and 
seems to shew that it was done for some definite 
reason. I would suggest that it is for mutual sup¬ 
port and protection in the next world. 

26. The robbed protodynastic grave No. 475, 
(Pl.LV), found near cemetery H, probably belonged 
to a stray resident of Tarkhan, which lies 14^2 miles 
away (see PI. II). 

The three graves 476, 477 and 478 appear to be 
of “ Pangrave ” date. The tombs were all robbed, 
but the shallow elliptical pit, and the resemblance 
to the pottery from Diospolis, indicate this period. 
Although these belong to the Xlllth, XIVth dy¬ 
nasties; they are included in PI. XXX for economy 
in space, and for the easy comparison of the pots 
with the predynastic types to which these pots 
are akin. 

The objects from the predynastic cemeteries G 
and H are as follows: 

Note: The graves are all tabulated on PI. XV. 

27. PI. VI, 1—5, see sections 62, 63 , on special 
graves. 

PI. VII, 1. Roughly flaked flint knife from grave 
468, cemetery H. 

VII, 2. Finely flaked forked lance, from same 
grave. 2:3. s. D. 50—51? 


VII, 3 . Large finely flaked forked lance, from 
cemetery H. Found alone, broken apparently since 
burial. 

VII, 4. Ripple-flaked flint knife from grave 457, 
cemetery H. 0 Appears to have been purposely 
broken when put in the grave; the missing frag¬ 
ment could not be found by sifting the contents 
of this and other graves near, S. D. 55—58, 2 : 3 . 

VII, 5, 6. Roughly flaked knife and bead from 
a robbed grave 415, cemetery G. S. D. 56— 60 , 2 : 3 . 
The beads are tabulated on PI. LIII, (58 bj, 79 g, 
85 jm). 

28. PI. XXV, i. Breccia two-handled vase, found 
above grave 457, probably belonging to it, with 
the knife VII, 4. 

XXV, 2. Decorated pot from grave 452; see 
drawing, scale 1:2, on PI. XXIX. 

XXV, 3 —7. Stone vases from cemeteriesGandH. 
Their dimensions are shown on PI. XLVI, 75, 36 , 
18, 45 and 25. The materials are 3 , alabaster; 
4, limestone; 5, alabaster; 6, slate; 7, alabaster. 
For groups see grave registers PI. LV. 

29. PI. XXIX, 1. Grave 403. The design of this 
pot consists of two boats of the usual type. The 
standards of the boats are no longer visible. Between 
the two boats is an object with zig-zag pattern, 
which I have not before seen in decorated pottery. 
Above are two ostriches, and there were probably 
others. The fan-like object on the right is known 
in other pots, but its nature is not apparent; it may 
be a matting sail with reed stiffening. (S.d.50—56.) 

XXIX, 2. Grave 452. Decorated pot. A photo¬ 
graph of the whole pot is shown on PI. XXV, 2. 
Human figures are seen upon the cabins in each 
boat, which is an unusual feature of these designs. 
The standards, of which a complete one is seen in 
the middle boat, is one of the commonest forms, 
and may be horns mounted on a staff. The palm- 
branches at the prow.of each boat are very clearly 
seen in this specimen. In the foreground and be¬ 
hind the boats are three antelopes, one with nearly 
straight horns, and the others with spiral horns. 
Scale 1:2; S. D. 55—58. 

CHAPTER IV 

THE OLD KINGDOM AND FIRST INTERMEDIATE 
GRAVES. 

30. THE eastern cemetery of Dandyl appears 
to begin about the Vlth dynasty, and to continue 










8 


THE OLD KINGDOM AND FIRST INTERMEDIATE GRAVES 


through the First Intermediate Period. It has some 
types of pottery peculiar to it, such as Nos. 16,17, 
18, 19, 20, 86, 87, 88, 89 and 91. (Pis. XXXII and 
XXXIII.) The last three types are of very light 
red ware with smooth buff slip, very different from 
the coarse red surface of the remainder of the 
pottery. This smooth ware seems to be typical 
of the First Intermediate Period. There is no pot 
or grave from this cemetery which could not be 
put between the Vlth dynasty and the Xth dynasty. 
Cemeteries C, C 2 and C 3 , on the other hand have 
a longer range of dates. This is shewn by the 
brick-red polished “Meydum” ware, PI. XXXI, 
A—H, which is not likely to be later than the 
Vth dynasty. The example of this ware from 
grave 571 in cemetery D is of very inferior polish 
to those of 125, and might well be of the Vlth 
dynasty. The pottery headrest from grave 148 
cannot well be later than the Vth, and the solid 
wooden headrest with a box-coffin from grave 173 
are more likely III—IVth dynasty. Graves 151 
and 192 are very little before the Xllth dynasty. 

Most of the pottery types between Nos. 29 and 
75 are not at all characteristic, and often occur 
singly in the graves. 

Button-seals and leg-amulets occur in both ceme¬ 
teries, but none of the graves containing them have 
pottery as well, except grave 800, where the leg- 
amulet is very degenerate in form and the pot un¬ 
characteristic. The button-seals and leg-amulets 
are of the Vlth dynasty, or at any rate very little 
later than this. The date agrees with the entire 
absence of buttons from the IXth dynasty ceme¬ 
tery of Herakleopolis worked 1921. 

Headrests only occur in cemeteries C,^C Z and C 3 . 

The position of the bodies gives us little help, 
for they were as a rule extended with the knees 
slightly bent, which attitude might occur any time 
between the Vth dynasty and the Middle Kingdom. 

I am inclined to think that cemeteries G, C z and 
C 3 are those of the usual small population of the 
district, between the Vlth and the Xlth dynasties; 
the better class being buried in the shaft tombs 
with coffins in C, while the poorer ones were buried 
in the soft marl nearer the cultivation as in C z 
and C 3 . Cemetery D on the other hand must have 
been that of a small community, who lived there 
during the First Intermediate Period only, and who 
appear to have been of the lower classes. I think 
that there is no doubt, in spite of the pots peculiar 
to this cemetery, that it was, at its period, con¬ 


temporary with the already well established ceme¬ 
tery C. 

3 1. The pottery types marked P are very close in 
form to (1) the group of Heri-Shaf-Hotep described 
in Borchardt, Priestergrdber, Plates LXXIX and 
LXXXVIII, which he dates as Vlth dynasty; 
(2) those marked Dn which are figured in Petrie, 
Dendereh, Pis. XVI and XVII; ( 3 ) those marked 
M which are figured in Garstang, Mahasna on 
Pis. XLI and XLII as Vth—Xlth dynastsie, and 
(4) those marked Z, which are figured in Petrie, 
Gizeh and Rifeh (Zaraby), as Vth—Vlth dynasties. 

32 . The objects of the Old Kingdom shewn in 
the plates are as follow: — 

Note: All the graves are tabulated in the tomb- 
registers, Pis. LVI, LVII unless otherwise stated. 

PI. VI. See chapter VI. 

PI. VIII. All the headrests with the exception 
of fig. 10 are of the Old Kingdom or First Inter¬ 
mediate Period; No. 1 was in a grave of a man 
named Imabim, parts of whose box-coffin are 
shewn on Pis. LXV and LXXIV and may be 
Illrd—IVth dynasty, (see Heliopolis, Shurafa and 
Kafr Ammar, sect. 36 ). It is of solid wood 2 r / 4 in¬ 
ches thick. Fig. 2 is a solid pottery headrest from 
grave 175. Since the body was in extended po¬ 
sition this may be as late as the Vth dynasty. 
No pottery was found with it. 

Fig. 3 is a two-footed headrest resembling those 
found at Kafr Ammar (see ref. a,bove) which may 
be Vth—Vlth dynasty. (See section 36 , type 3 , of 
that volume.) This was the only example of this 
type in the cemetery. The body in this tomb (174) 
was in a semi-contracted position, with no coffin 
or pottery. 

Figs. 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 might be any time between 
the Vlth and the Xlth (see Kafr Ammar sect. 35, 
type 7). An instance is known in the Xllth dynasty 
at that place. 

Fig. 6 was originally painted yellow with traces 
of bright red, and has two lines of inscription in 
black. The vertical inscription reads: Imakhu kher 
neb-f Ihynes “Honoured One under his Lord; Ihynes.” 
The horizontal inscription reads: Imakhu kher neter 
'a neb pet Ihynes “Honoured One under the Great 
God, Lord of Heaven; Ihynes.” It is in a very 
bad condition. Fragments of very roughly painted 
wooden figures, with bright red bodies and black 
caps and features, were found in this grave, the 
peculiarity of them being the extreme thinness of 
the head and body when viewed from the front. 





OLD KINGDOM AND INTERMEDIATE GRAVES 


9 


They could not be preserved as they powdered 
at a touch. 

Fig. 10 is a fine alabaster headrest of the Xth— 
Xlth dynasty, the head-piece and the base being 
separate from the stem. It was found half way 
up a shaft in cemetery E; nothing else was found 
with it. 

33 . PI.IX. Fig. i. Both alabaster vases marked i 
are from grave 208 and appear to be of the Vlth 
dynasty or slightly later. The body, that of a wo¬ 
man, lay full length on back. 

Fig. 2, together with the three vases below, are 
also of about the Vlth dynasty; the handled vase 
is of limestone, of a very unusual type for this 
period. 

Fig. 4 is a button-seal group of the Vlth dynasty 
from the Dandyl cemetery. The other beads of 
this group are to be found from the tomb-registers. 
(PI. LVII, grave 591.) The design on the button- 
seal apparently represents an ape. Other speci¬ 
mens may be seen in the University College col¬ 
lection. The hand is of bone and is not shewn in 
the bead registers. 

Fig. 5 is another group of the Vlth dynasty from 
Dandyl. Neither in this case, (grave 5g3,) nor in 
grave 591, was there any pottery; the bodies were 
broken up by an intruded Coptic burial. 

Fig. 6 is a group of about the Vlth dynasty, 
including a button-seal, leg-amulets in carnelian, 
some very delicate pottery, apes, uzats, and hawks; 
two silver cowries; two “million of years” amulets 
in gold (see Petrie, Amulets, No. 59, dated Xllth); 
one gold hawk; a small gold shell; and a wheel¬ 
like. amulet in gold. The centre piece of the last 
named is placed below it on the right, and has 
been left loose to shew the method of soldering 
the “spokes” on to the “axle.” It possibly re¬ 
presents the Sun, and is a Syrian rather than an 
Egyptian emblem. The remainder of the group 
consists of a hand in carnelian, and a double lion- 
head, (shewn immediately beneath the hand). 

Figs. 7 and 8. Two views of a fine hard-wood 
headrest, the headpiece being supported by two 
carved hands. It is of the Vlth dynasty, or slightly 
later, and was found in a robbed child’s burial (86), 
in cemetery C, under the sherd deposits. A flint 
flake was the only other object found with the 
headrest. 

Fig. 9 is a group of about the Vlth dynasty, 
containing an example of the curious seals already 
described in Diospolis, p. 3 g, Pis. XXVI and LI; 


the design, which does not seem to be readable, 
strongly resembles that seen on the scaraboid in 
tomb 23 1, PI. XIV, 14. The remainder of the group 
consists of a turtle (?), an uzat-e ye, both in carnelian, 
and the beads indicated in the tomb register of the 
tomb (188). 

34. PI. XIV, fig. 1 3 . Quartz amulet, perhaps re¬ 
presenting Harpocrates, and gold pendant from 
grave 221; date uncertain, but probably Second 
Intermediate Period. 

Fig. 14. Group of beads and scaraboid of the 
First Intermediate Period from tomb z 3 i. Most of 
these beads, except the human figure's and the 
crowned hawks, are given in the tomb registers 
on Pis. LVI, LVII. 

PI. XXII, fig. 4. Gold-on-paste beads from graves 
233 and 212; cemetery C 3 . The date appears to be 
Second Intermediate. The amulets approach the 
Middle Kingdom forms. (See sect. 59.) 

35. PI. XXIII. Copper mirrors, of which figs. 1 
and 3 to 7 are pre-XIIth dynasty. Their grave 
numbers are all marked in the bottom left-hand 
corner. Fig. 6 is of an unusual form, having two 
long catches of copper, so that it could be attached 
to a strap or belt. Fig. 2 is a wooden pin found 
with mirror fig. 1; grave 2. 

PI. XXV, figs. 8, 9 and 11. Groups of alabaster 
vases from grave 218 which appear to be of the 
First Intermediate Period. (See PI. XLVI, nos. 10, 
11 and 12 to */ 3 scale.) No other objects occurred 
with them. 

CHAPTER V 

MIDDLE KINGDOM GRAVES, SHERD DEPOSITS 
AND OBJECTS. 

36 . The graves of the Middle Kingdom at Hara- 
geh were, on the whole, of much richer type than 
those of the other dynasties represented here. It is 
striking how few graves of the poorer classes of 
the Xllth dynasty were found. The probability 
is that the cultivation here was occupied by the 
estates of those who were connected with the 
building of the Pyramid of El-Lahun. The poorer 
population would live nearer Kahun, and be buried 
on that desert rather than this. Many poor graves 
might be on the edges of the desert now covered 
by the rise of Nile deposits. 

The graves of this period were of the shaft type, 
having chambers opening to N. and S., sometimes 
there were two series of chambers at different 




IO 


MIDDLE KINGDOM GRAVES, SHERD DEPOSITS AND OBJECTS 


levels. It will be noticed that, in the tomb registers 
Pis. LVIII to LXII, if there is only one chamber 
in a tomb, it is nearly always on the South; this 
shews that the South chamber was the first to be 
excavated. The reason is probably that, since the 
body was required to lie head to North, by putting 
it in a chamber on the South the head would be 
within reach, so that the beads, usekht-c ollar, etc., 
could be finally arranged and the incense and 
offerings, which generally lay at the head, could 
be easily inserted. 

The cemetery was very prolific in pottery, but 
unfortunately only thirteen graves were dated to 
a reign, one to Menthuhotep II, five to Senusert II 
(40, 41, 124, 140?, 529), four to Senusert III (91, 3 06, 
602, 628) and four to Amenemhet III (3i2, 620, 640, 
642); of these only eight contain more than one 
pot. With only these dates, it is rather difficult 
to put any group to a definite reign. 

37. The pottery and objects shew that, with the 
exception of about 25 tombs, all the tombs could 
well be within the limits of the 'reigns of Senusert II 
to Amenemhet III. Apart from the dated graves, 
there is no instance of a type of pot degenerating 
with any regularity. The types 67 s, 7j-r7 0, and 
5W 2 and sy occur throughout the periods, and 
afford no help in comparative dating in this dy¬ 
nasty. The types 9, with the wavy rim, seem to 
be early, as they occur in a loculus-grave (281) 
with type 28 in the Old Kingdom registers. The 
corrugated necked series (“salad mixer”) of type 49 
(see PI.XXXVIII) also seems to be early, probably 
before Senusert II, as this is unknown in Riqqeh, 
and does not occur with any dated tomb at Harageh. 
Type 57, and particularly 57j, is later, as it occurs 
rarely in cemetery A, although it is common in the 
other cemeteries, where it has been found dated to 
Senusert III and Amenemhet III. This type is un¬ 
known at Riqqeh, where the shaft tombs stop short 
at the reign of Senusert III, the graves of Amenem- 
Mt III being only very poor ones. We may there¬ 
fore safely put this type as of Senusert III and later. 

The other types seem to have a range of the 
whole Xllth dynasty except certain types which, 
occurring but once, do not justify us limiting them 
to any reign. 

Some forms seem to be specially associated with 
graves, and not to occur in town sites. The types: 
5 d > Sw 2) 5X, 5y, 7j—70, 38 g— 38 v (more common 
in the early Xllth graves), 41b—41 x, 670—67s, 
the small types 56 and 58, and incense-burner, 


types 90 h—90 x may be looked on as the typical 
pottery for a Xllth dynasty tomb. I know the 
types 7i—70 and 41b—41 x only in town sites of 
this date; the other types seem only to be used 
in graves. 

38 . The usekht bead-collar occurred in most of 
the burials, but no was or heq sceptres were found. 

3 g. A considerable quantity of “Tell el Yahu- 
diyeh ” pottery was found in Harageh, but I would 
not date graves in which this pottery was found 
as necessarily post-XIIth. This ware occurs in 
Kahun (see Kahun PI. XXVII, fig. 202) and in 
Harageh in the sherd mounds of Senusert II, and 
even in an Xlth dynasty house-ruin (see sect. 73). 
Since this appears to be a foreign pot from Syria,- 
it is interesting to find it so far South at such an 
early age. It seems likely that the majority of 
examples came down with the artisan class who 
were engaged on the construction of the pyramid 
of Senusert II at Lahun. 

40. The other foreign pottery, shewn on PI. X, 
nos. 9—12, are quite new to me, and I have as yet 
been able to find no countertypes to give a clue 
as to their place of origin. 

The scarabs of this dynasty are dealt with in 
chapter VIII, together with the other scarabs from 
El Harageh. 

41. Between cemetery A and c 2 ,c 3 , were three 
large deposits of Xllth dynasty potsherds and 
other town material. One of these deposits com¬ 
pletely covered cemetery C. 

The pottery chiefly consisted qf broken natron- 
jars of the type 670 (PI. XXXIX), a few of 41b 
and 7 o, and an enormous number of fragments of 
coarse flat dishes. Many of the sherds were marked 
with potter’s and owner’s marks, particularly the 
natron-jars, which nearly always had a mark in¬ 
side the neck (see PI. XI, nos. 7—25). All the 
potter’s marks found are shewn on Pis. XI and 
XII, together with all those found on pots in the 
graves. The limestone block of Kha'-Kheper-Re , 
Senusert II, came from these sherds. This was 
the only dated object. The deposit also yielded 
a number of spindle whorls, wooden pegs, a frag¬ 
ment of “Tell el Yahudiyeh” black pottery, rough 
seals in limestone, and about 20 pieces of Cretan 
Kamares ware, similar to those found by Prof. Petrie, 
25 years before, at Kahun. These fragments have 
been examined by Sir Arthur Evans, who dates 
them to the Middle Minoan II period (see Illahun, 
Kahun and Gurob, PI. I). ■ 





MIDDLE KINGDOM OBJECTS 


II 


42. Although this is essentially a deposit of town 
rubbish, I do not think that the town stood here 
at all, as 1. the depth of the deposit is not more 
than a foot average; 2. There is very little mud 
from bricks; 3 . the desert below the sherds was 
quite smooth and 4. there are no heavy objects 
whatever, such as millstones, hearth-stones, mor¬ 
tars, etc. It appears that the rubbish has beep 
carried up the slope by cemetery C 3 , and dumped 
here. Possibly it was to clear a piece of ground 
for an estate, though many other explanations 
would meet the case. 

43. No objects of a period later than the Xllth 
dynasty were found here. Had the deposit covered 
the period of Senusert III and Amenemhet III, 
some cylinders or objects would surely have been 
found as the names of these two kings are very 
common on small objects. 

44. The objects of the Middle Kingdom shewn 
in the plates as follows:— 

Note: All the graves are also tabulated in the tomb- 
registers, Pis. LVIII — LXIJ. 

PI. VII, 8. Flint knife from tomb 135; 2 / 3 size. 
This pit in cemetery A was merely a deposit of 
various types of pottery, etc., chiefly in small frag¬ 
ments, the types 12 q and 67s alone being distin¬ 
guishable. I can give no explanation of this. - 

Figs. 9, 10 and 11 are from the sherd deposits 
over cemetery C, and are also 2 / 3 size. These are 
probably of the time of- Senusert II. 

45. PI. VIII, 1. Beads representing the “Flail of 
Osiris.” All are of green glazed pottery, with the 
exception of the top pyramidal beads which are 
of carnelian. For various forms and meaning of 
this Xllth dyn. amulet, see Mace and Winlock, 
Tomb of Senebtisi, pp. 100, 101. This example is 
composite, and not from one grave. 

46. Figs. 8, 9, 11, 12 are apparently foreign pot¬ 
tery, but I am unable to say their place of origin. 
Of the two pots of grave 326 the upper one is of 
light brownish pottery, smoother than the usual 
Egyptian types in this dynasty, with the upper 
part red with black painted panels. This pot is 
in the University College collection. The lower 
pot is of nearly the same ware as the last. The 
hollowed base can be seen in PI. XLI, figs. 98 q 
and 98 w. The grave seems to be of the Xllth 
dynasty. 

Fig. 11 is of the same ware as the last two, but 
has a pink top. The date is Xllth dynasty, pro¬ 
bably early. 


PI. X, 12, is of unique form and colour being of a 
red, almost plum-coloured, polish with white bands 
between black lines. No pottery was found to date 
this by, except the two “Tell el Yahudiyeh” white- 
incised pieces of types c}9 f and 99 g, which are 
certainly before the XVIIth dynasty, but could 
just as well be Xllth. 

Fig. 10 see sec. 77, New Kingdom. 

47. PI. XI. On this plate are shewn all the own¬ 
er’s marks and potter’s marks occurring at Harageh. 
Those made before the pot was baked are classed 
as pot marks, and those scratched on after baking 
as owner’s marks. Some of these, such as nos. 107 
—109, bear a great resemblance to those of Kahun, 
see Petrie, Kahun, Gurob and Hawara, PI. XXVII. 

Fig. 35. Rough limestone plaque of Senusert II, 
see sect. 41, of this chapter. 

Fig. 36 . Glazed pottery ring. 

Figs. A—H see sect. 73 on special graves. 

48. PI. XII, 21—26 are from the sherd deposits 
by cemetery C, and are all owner’s marks. See 
Kahun, PI. XXVII. 

Figs. 27—40 are from pots found in the tombs 
(see tomb registers). Most of the marks are of the 
Middle Kingdom (M. K.), but the period of each 
is marked, together with the tomb number, in the 
left bottom corner. Owner’s marks and potter’s 
marks are distinguished by the letters “O. M.” and 
“P. M.” respectively. 

PI. XIII. Plans nos. 1 (grave no), 8 and 9 refer 
to the tomb registers in which the dimensions of 
the tombs could not be described in tabular form; 
the remainder are dealt with in chapter VI on 
special graves. 

49. PI. XIV, 1. Group of pottery, human figures, 
beads, double scarab, lion bead, cartonnage, lime¬ 
stone eye, flint flake and copper hook from grave 112. 

The use of these pottery figures is by no means 
clear. They are certainly not ushabtiu, neither are 
they pierced for stringing, and they are very un¬ 
like the usual type of Egyptian work, suggesting 
a foreign origin. Their colour varies from the 
ordinary green glazed pottery to very light greyish 
coloured paste. Another grave, no. 236 , shews this 
class of human figure in conjunction with a late 
Xllth scarab (PI. XX, 70). The scarab shewn here 
is not very characteristic; it is double with a beetle 
on one side, and a double scroll on the other. The 
curious fact of the figure from grave 236 is that 
it appears to have a pointed beard. The centre 
figure is part of a group of a boy carrying a calf on 

2* 


r 




12 


MIDDLE KINGDOM GRAVES, SHERD DEPOSITS AND OBJECTS 


his back, well known in this age ( Ramesseum , II, 2); 
it has been attached to the boy by pegs. On the 
left is an alabaster model of a game board. 

50. XIV, 2. Amulet made by threading discs of 
quartz and other stones on a core of copper wire, 
and fitting both ends with hollow caps of gold. 
These amulets occur several times at Harageh, 
and one of a very similar type formed part of the 
Dahshur treasure. See De Morgan, Dahchour, 1894, 
PI. XIX, fig. 56. 

Fig. 3 . Group of the reign of Senusert III con¬ 
sisting of two cylinders (XX, 26 and 28), four 
scarabs (three plain, and one shewn in XX, 27), 
and two gold fish of much inferior work to that 
of tomb 72 (sect. 67). The beads are of the forms 
ioe, 34m, 44e, 73t, 75 r (Pis. L—LIII). 

No pottery was found with this group. 

Fig. 4. Cylindrical “amulet-case” of a hitherto 
unknown design, being a further example of the 
pectoral jewellery work. The inlay was of car- 
nelian, green felspar, and lapis-lazuli, set obliquely 
in electrum. Much of this has dropped out, and 
the ring, or whatever method of attachment was 
used, has disappeared. 

The gold cylinder amulet seen in Dahchour, 1894, 
PI. XXIV, 55, is of a type intermediate between 
this and that of grave 211 (see sect. 71). The gold 
work resembling that of grave 211 and the oblique 
design here described. 

51. Fig. 5 see sect. 71. 

Fig. 6 . Green pottery calf with black markings, 
lying down. Xllth dynasty, grave 353; 2 / 3 size. 

Fig. 7. Pottery frog, blue, with black spots, from 
the same grave as no. 6; 2 / 3 size. 

Fig. 8. Light-green glazed pottery dog lying 
curled up, early Xllth dynasty, 2 / 3 size. With this 
was found a large rough limestone hippopotamus 
lying down. 

Fig. 9. A deep-blue glazed pottery Ptah Sokar, 
this being, I believe, the earliest known; its fea¬ 
tures are even more exaggerated than is shewn in 
the photograph, the belly projecting to an extent 
never observed in the later figures. 2 / 3 size. 

Fig. 10. Light-green glazed vase with lotus pat¬ 
tern; tomb 7, Xllth dynasty; 2 / 3 size. 

Fig. 11. Small light-green glazed pottery seated 
figure; tomb 73, Xllth dynasty; 2 / 3 size. 

Fig. 12. Blue paste hippopotamus from grave 7. 
Xllth dynasty, 2 / 3 size. 

Figs. 1 3 and 14. See sect. 34; Old Kingdom 
(PI. XV see sect. 69, special graves). 


52. PI. XVI, fig. 1. Stele of Kenemsu and Seru- 
ket (see sect. 94 for inscription) from grave 140; 
Xllth dynasty. This stele occurred with part of 
another stele of Neb-pu (PI. LXXII, 1). For draw¬ 
ing, see PI. LXXIV, 4. 

Fig. 2 and stone vases, see sect. 69 on special 
graves. 

53. PI.XVII, 1. Wooden statuette from grave 3 z 3 ; 
scale 1 : 3 . Both hands originally held some objects 
which have now disappeared. The moulding of the 
arms and body is very good, and the statuette had 
been well finished. The nipples of the breasts pro¬ 
ject in a manner characteristic of this period. Both 
legs are broken off, and there is no name upon 
the statuette. It has been badly split by salt crys¬ 
tallizing within the wood. Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 2. End pieces of a collar, of green and black 
glazed pottery, from grave 96. Xllth dynasty. 

54. p Fig. 3 . Wooden dagger from grave 280; 
scale 2:3. Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 4. Wooden pin(?) found with above. 

Figs. 5 and 6. Flint from the surface of the desert 
North of cemetery A. It appears to be palaeolithic. 

Fig. 7. Flint from the sherd deposits over ceme¬ 
tery C. I cannot give a date to this. 

55. PI. XVIII and PI. I (Frontispiece). Pair 
of wooden statuettes of the Xllth dynasty from 
tomb 262, cemetery E. 

XVIII, 1. Side view of male figure to a scale 
of 2: 3 . He originally held in his left hand a staff 
which rested on the stand. The right hand was 
grasping some object which has now perished. 
The nipples and the fastening of the apron project 
in a manner characteristic of this dynasty, and 
the details of the apron are well shown. The arms 
are tenoned in to the body. The face is of un¬ 
conventional type, probably a portrait; the length 
of the head, and the projecting ears, are very 
noticeable. The modelling of the whole statuette, 
although good, was not so fine as that of the 
statuette shewn in PI. XVII, 1; here the legs and 
arms are very coarsely modelled. There is no 
inscription'., on the stand. 

When this statuette was found, I noticed that 
the toes were missing, so I had the whole tomb 
sifted with a fine sieve. About 11 tons were exa¬ 
mined in this way, resulting in the finding of the 
missing parts; no other trace of woodwork was 
found. 

The female figure was of more conventional 
type (see nos. 2, 3 and 5). She is painted yellow 




MIDDLE KINGDOM OBJECTS 


l3 


and black, with her wig done in the manner com¬ 
mon to the period. Her arms are tenoned on to 
the body, both her hands being stretched down 
beside her. 

Fig. 4 is a view of her stand seen from above. 
The inscription reads “May the king give an offer¬ 
ing and (?) Osiris, Lord of Abydos, may he give 
funeral offerings, ducks (oxen), to the ka of the 
justified, Kemtet.” 

56. PI. XIX, 1. Black granite seated figure from 
grave 606. The name, Shesmuhotep, is discussed 
in sect. 98. 

The work is coarse and the detail poor; the 
right hand lies on the right knee, and the left 
hand is placed on the left shoulder. The date is 
probably Xlth dynasty. 

Fig. 2. Table of offerings from the same grave 
as fig. 1. It is of limestone, and the statuette may 
have stood upon it, although the fit is not good. 
No other objects were found in this shaft-tomb. 

Fig. 3 . Side and front-view of small limestone 
figure (perhaps a king) presenting a bowl of offer¬ 
ings. The work is rough, with very little detail. 
The pottery and beads found with this are shewn 
in the tomb-registers on PI. LIX, grave 162. With 
this was found the dyad shewn in PI. XXV. The 
date appears to be early Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 4. Side and front view of a black granite 
statuette of a man. The name is not given, and 
the statuette is of the coarse unfinished-looking 
work seen in the stone figures in this district. 
See PI. LIX, grave 141, for alabaster vases and 
pottery found with this. The date appears to be 
early Xllth dynasty, probably of the time of 
Senusert II. 

57. PI. XXII, 1. Group of amulets from grave 
354, which includes stone vases, types 18, 27 and 
28 (PI. XLVI), and the scarab on PI. XX, no. 3 g. 
The cylinder amulet is apparently of wood, spirally 
bound by flat gold wire; the ends are covered with 
gold caps, one having a ring with which to suspend 
the amulet. The group includes strings of amethyst, 
carnelian and garnet, and a large quantity of hawk 
and other amulets in steaschist, paste and pottery, 
and two small wooden frogs. The date appears to 
be late Xllth dynasty. With this were found pot¬ 
tery of the types 38 ot (Pis. XXXV and XXXVI), 
and a black, white-incised, handled pot of “Tell 
el Yahudiyeh ” ware, type 99 d, PI. XLI. 

58. Fig. 2. Group from grave 154; Xllth dynasty. 
The outer string is of amethyst, the colour being 


fairly deep, but not of the depth of those of the 
Lahun treasure. The inner string is of garnet. In 
the centre, at the top, are two gold-ribbed beads, 
and at the bottom a lazuli scarab on a gold plate. 
The remaining objects are three gold shells, two 
gold crocodiles and a gold turtle. The three last 
are only thin shells and were probably mounted 
on a paste core. With this group were found 7 
small uzat-e yes roughly cut from gold sheet. 

59. Fig. 3 . See sect. 77. 

Fig. 4. The amulets are of the Xllth dynasty, 
from grave 322; their materials are to be found 
in the tomb registers, PI. LX, together with the 
beads from this tomb. 

Fig. 5. See sect. 67, on special graves. 

PI. XXIII, figs. 1—7. See chap. IV, sect. 35. 
Old Kingdom. 

Figs. 8—12, 14 and 17. See sect. 69, on special 
graves. 

Fig. i 3 . See sect. 73, on special graves. 

Fig. 15. Copper mirror, from tomb 532, with un¬ 
usual form of handle. It is probable that it was 
originally a ring for suspending the mirror. With 
it were found fragments of a cylinder amulet of 
the type shewn in PI. XIV, 2. Late Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 16. Copper mirror from tomb 275. This is 
of the usual form, to fit into a handle. For group 
see PI. LX. Early Xllth dynasty. 

60. PI. XXIV. Xllth dynasty steles; see sects. 
89, 91, 92 on inscribed objects. 

PI. X,XV, figs. 10, 12, 1 3 , 14. Fine translucent 
alabaster (aragonite) vases from tomb 275. Early 
Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 15. Basalt dyad of woman and child, found 
with the small limestone figure with bowl shewn 
on PI. XIX, 3 . This piece, which is of very coarse 
work, is shewn 2 / 3 size and is remarkable for the 
extreme distortion of the right arm, which is around 
the neck of the boy. The dyad, which is not in¬ 
scribed, is of the early Xllth dynasty. 

CHAPTER VI 

SPECIAL GRAVES AND TOMBS. 

61. Grave 401, cemetery G. Predynastic. See 
PI. XIII, 2 and PL LV. It was untouched, the body 
lying in a totally contracted position, on the left 
side, with the head to South. The position of the 
pottery is shewn on PI. XIII, 2, the table below 
the three predynastic graves giving the types of 




SPECIAL GRAVES AND TOMBS 


H 

the pots, whose positions are indicated by letters 
on the tomb-plans. 

South of the head lay an alabaster vase, shewn 
on PI. XXV, 7, and PI. XLVI, 25. Two small flint 
flakes lay before, and slightly to the South of, the 
face. 

62. Grave 460, cemetery H. Predynastic. See 
PI. VI, 4 and 5 and PI. XIII, 3 . This burial was 
also untouched, the body lying in a semi-contracted 
position on the left side with the face to West. 
In front of the face were six. quartz marbles. These 
were moved down by the elbow, when the photo¬ 
graph was taken, to get them out of the shadow. 
Two of these marbles are shewn full size in PI.VI, 5. 

63 . Grave 470, cemetery H. Predynastic. See 
PI. VI, 1—- 3 , and PI. XIII, 4. The objects were all 
before the face, the head lying to the North facing 
East. The two-handled basalt-pot, shewn full size 
in fig. 3 , had a wooden cover and contained one 
shell bead. The red jasper amulet, shewn in fig. 3 , 
although known as a type, has never before been 
found in a grave. Hitherto this class of seal was 
dated to the Vlth—Vllth dynasty ( Diospolis , XXV, 
W. 165), but here the combination leaves no doubt 
as to its being predynastic. 

64. Tomb 99 (Old Kingdom). This tomb contained 
the bodies of six children in three full size coffins, laid 
closely together and lying North and South. In the 
most westerly coffin, which we may call no. 1, were 
three children, all with their heads to the North, 
laid on a bed of sand. In the centre of the coffin 
was a child of about 14, lying facing West with 
limbs slightly flexed. At each end of this coffin 
a very small child lay in the same position as the 
older one. 

In coffin 2, i. e. that lying in the middle, was a 
single body of a child of about 14 years, in bad 
condition, it extended full length on the right side. 
In the Eastern coffin (no. 3 ), there were two child¬ 
ren, one about 12 years old and the other an infant. 
These bodies had been disturbed. At the North 
end of coffins 1 and 2 were slate palettes, that of 
no. 1 being a plain oval and that of no. 2 an oblong 
with an incised line round the edge, the lines cross¬ 
ing at the corners. The decorated palette is now 
at the Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge. Both these 
are probably predynastic and re-used. 

The coffins were mitre-jointed, all defects plas¬ 
tered over. These bodies were in a loculus on 
the West of the main shaft, there being no other 
chamber in the tomb. 


65. Tomb 671, 672 (First Intermediate Period). 
This double tomb was found near cemetery D on 
the Dandyl side of the Gebel Abusir. Both had 
been completely robbed, only pottery of the types 
16, 99, 100, ix 3 remaining. There were no coffins, 
but both chambers were inscribed. These are trans¬ 
lated and described in chapter IX, sects. 83 , 84. 
The inscriptions are shewn in Pis. LXVII and 
LXVIII and a photograph of the tomb on PI.VI, 6. 

The tomb belonged to Heri-shaf-nakht and his 
wife Ukht-hotep. Names introducing the god Hari- 
shaf or Hershef of Ehnasya are very well known. 

66. Grave 651 (Old Kingdom). See PI. X, 7. 
There were four bodies in this grave, which mea¬ 
sured 75N.; 85E.; and 60 deep. All lay with head 
to North, extended on back, heads to East, and 
side by side. Numbering from West to East, no. 1 
and 2, both males, were without any objects; no. 3 , 
which was that of a female, had the green glazed 
beads shewn in the photograph, and no. 4 the 
limestone mace head beside his left elbow, and the 
brilliant bluish green glazed pot above his head. 
None of the bodies had coffins, and no trace of 
clothing was found. One pot of type 19 (PI. XXXI) 
was placed at the North middle of the grave. The 
date is almost certainly Vlth dynasty. 

67. Grave 72 (Middle Kingdom). This large shaft- 
tomb contained two chambers on the North, and 
one chamber on the South side of the shaft, at a 
depth of 260 inches. The shaft measured 36 ins. N. 
and 100 ins. E. The South chamber measured 123 
ins. N., 121 ins. E., and 58 ins. high. Both this and 
the two North chambers had been completely rob¬ 
bed, except for some pottery. On the West side 
of the centre of the South chamber there was a 
Shaft 60 ins. E. by 35 ins. N., and 90 ins. deep, lead¬ 
ing into a chamber on the South, 40 ins. N. by 
90 ins. E. by 49 ins. high; this appeared to be un¬ 
touched, having perhaps been under the coffins 
in the chamber above. In it lay the body of a 
child about 10 years old, head to north and fully 
extended on back. It had been in a coffin, which 
has now fallen to pieces. The body was wrapped 
in linen, and contained a large quantity of beads, 
some of which are shewn on PI. XXII, 5, while 
the remainder are drawn in the bead corpus. The 
types are 47r, 7ohi, 73ir, 75f, 7gjkm, 8sq and g2np 
(Pis. L to LIII). The stone vases, types 35, 53, 54, 
72, 73 (Pis. XLVI, XLVII), were either in the 
coffin or close on the East side, fig. 54 being a vexy 
minute two-handled marble pot. The finest object 


JEWELLERY 


15 


from this child’s burial is a perfect gold model of 
a fish (called shal in Arabic). A full sized photo¬ 
graph is shewn on PI. X, 14. It appears to be solid 
gold, but I think, from the weight it is made on 
a copper core; the delicacy of the work and the 
fidelity of the details is unsurpassed by anything 
I have seen. Two other gold fish, of very inferior 
workmanship to the first, were found in the coffin 
with it. The jewellery also includes silver cowries 
and small whorl shells, tipped with gold rings 
cemented on to them. Two scarabs, one plain and 
the other scrolled and with a gold rim, were also 
found with the above. A large quantity of gold- 
leaf was collected in the North chambers, which 
lay at a depth of i 3 o and 260 inches respectively 
below ground level. The upper measured 32 ins. N., 
by 105 ins. E., by 40 ins. high, and the lower mea¬ 
sured 24 ins. N., by 65 ins. E., by 35 ins. high. The 
pottery is all typical of the time of Senusert II, 
and was of the following types: 2e 2 e 4 f 4 ; jw,x; 
7j,z; iom,w; 38 r: 4ij; 56h 2 ; 67s; (Pis. XXIV— 
XLI). Only a few pots of type 5w 2 were found 
in the child’s chamber. 

68. Tomb 92 (Middle Kingdom). For dimensions 
see tomb registers PL LVIII. This tomb was far 
more accurately cut than the others in cemetery A, 
the North chamber being very finely squared and 
dressed. The South chamber was more roughly 
cut. It had a recess for canopic jars Which 
appeared not to have been finished, and at the 
South end of the chamber there was a pit 18 
inches cube. I think that the canopic jars were 
placed in the pit. 

The 4 canopic jars were of limestone, and the 
heads were all human. They were originally painted 
in blue, yellow, and black. The inscriptions, of which 
only those on two of the jars were legible, are shewn 
in PL LXXV, 2 and 3 , and translated with the other 
inscriptions in sect. g7; they are of very coarse work. 
The inscription is in black on a yellow ground. The 
remainder of the objects from this tomb, which was 
badly plundered, consisted of a large quantity of 
gold leaf, one flint flake, an ivory pin and 3 i clay 
balls. 

Pottery (Pis. XXXIV—XLI): 5 h 2 l 2 m 2 y; 41 fj; 
56bd; 67s. Stone (Pl. XLVI): No. 20, a very fine 
alabaster of typical early Xllth type. The name 
on the canopic jars was Senebtisi. 

69. Tomb 124. The owner of this tomb—a wo¬ 
man—was apparently called Itenhab, from a paint¬ 
ed stele found in the inner chamber (cf. sect. 14), 


which is discussed in sect. g 3 . The plan of the 
tomb is given on Pl. XIII. 

The tomb had been plundered, but yielded fur¬ 
ther examples of the inlaid jewellery of the Xllth 
dynasty; in this case in silver. Although the silver 
has perished badly, the design of the pectoral can 
be reconstructed to some extent. It is shewn on 
Pl. XV, 2, and consists of the remains of four pieces. 
The design of the largest, which is in fragments, 
is a sceptre supporting the cartouche Kha'-Kheper- 
Re', Senusert II, supported on either side by royal 
hornets (biti), behind which are two lotuses forming 
the sides of the pectoral. Above are uzat-e yes. 
The resemblance in workmanship to the jewellery 
of tomb 124 at Riqqeh (see Riqqeh and Memphis VI, 
Pl. I), is most striking. We have sceptres (?) flanked 
by hornets in this case, and hawks in the case at 
Riqqeh; but the simpler nature of these designs 
will not compare with the wonderful fineness and 
detail of the Dahshfir and Lahun jewellery. 

Another piece, which does not belong to the last, 
is an inlaid Horus, with the double-feather-crown, 
standing on a wet-sign and holding a beetle (?). 
The workmanship here resembles the Riqqeh hawks 
and nebs. The small piece on the right may belong 
to the hawk, but I cannot see the connection. 

The silver is too much perished to determine if the 
designs were engraved on the reverse side of the 
pectoral, as is the case in all the knowjj. examples 
of this kind. 

The centre- piece, of which three views are shewn 
below the main pectoral, is unique as regards 
this type of work, as it is in three dimensions as 
opposed to the flat designs of all other known 
specimens of this work. It consists of a silver 
hornet with inlaid wings, holding by its curved 
silver legs on to a ring, the whole having formed 
part of a buckle. 

It appears to me that this jewellery and that, of 
Riqqeh are undoubtedly the work of one hand. 
Whether they are from the same hand as those 
of Dahshur and Lahun is more doubtful. None of 
the royal jewellery is of this coarseness, but it 
appears to be at any rate the work of the same 
school, though the touch of the master-hand seems 
to be lacking. Probably it was a present from the 
king to the holder. 

(It is possible that the cartouche may belong to 
the Hor Nub fragment, as the cartouche on the top 
of the mankhet does not look right. We have the 
two hawks supporting the cartouche in De Morgan, 




i6 


SPECIAL GRAVES AND TOMBS 


Dahchour 1894, PI. XV, 2, and the two hawks or 
wr-birds supporting a sekhem in the case of the 
Riqqeh jewellery, as examples.) 

The remainder of the group consists of: — 

Five scarabs, PI. XV, 1, one being silver mounted. 
A large quantity of gold, carnelian, and other 
beads, some of which are shewn in PI. XV, 3 . 
Small shells mounted in silver to hang as pendants 
on a necklace (this is the first known example of 
this work). Silver cowries, shewn full size in PI.XV, 4. 
Three mirrors, one being shewn with its pottery 
handle, on PI. XV, 6, and the others on PI. XXIII, 
8,12,14 and 17. Stone vases, PI. XVI and Pls.XLVI, 
XLVII, 19, 24, 36 , 52, 58— 63 , 68—75. Copper razor, 
PI. XV, 9, and PI. XXIII, 10. Copper razor, PI. XV, 
7, and PI. XXIII, 11. Copper knife (?), PI. XV, 8, 
and PI. XXIII, 9. Toilet spoon of slate, fashioned 
like a river-mussel, PI. XV, 10. In the grave there 
was a small rubbing-stone for grinding the eye 
paint, which may have belonged to this. Alabaster 
toilet spoon in the form of an 'ankh, PI. XV, n. 

The pottery was of the following types (see 
Pis.XXXIV—XLI): 5 w 2 ,y; 7j 2 ; 41m; 56a,h 3 ; 58j,t 4 ; 
and the beads of the types (see Pis. L—LIII): 5U; 
36 h; 38 r; 44b, d,t; 50c; 65d; 73a, c, m 3 , n,n 2 ,r,y; 
791 , k,m. 

Although the burial must have had a set of 
canopic jars, since there is a small chamber 20 ins. 
cube, on the East of the inside South chamber, no 
traces of them were found; they had been probably 
of wood. 

70. Tomb 128 (Middle Kingdom). The only ex¬ 
ample of the positions of the pottery in a large 
Xllth dynasty burial was furnished by this tomb. 

The shaft had two South chambers and one on 
the North, their depths below the ground level 
being 3 10, 190 and 23 o inches respectively. 

The upper South chamber was undisturbed, al¬ 
though the' coffin may have been opened. The 
distribution of the pottery is shewn on PI. XIII, 7. 
Large quantities of pots of types 7n and 67 s were 
found in the other chambers. 

The body lay with head to North, fully extended 
on back, and was that of a young female. No beads 
whatever were found on her. The cattle bones and 
dog bones, and the few beads, all came from the 
other two chambers, which had been very com¬ 
pletely plundered. 

The coffin was in bad condition, and was un¬ 
painted except for four or five transverse bands 
of hieroglyphs, each beginning with the phrase 


"Words spoken;” the names of the gods however 
could not be read. 

The shaft contained three other female skulls 
but no bones. 

The measurements of the North chamber were: 
height 44; N. 68; E. 85; those of the upper South 
chamber: height 35; N. 50; E. 80. The lower South 
chamber measured 45 high; N. 52; E. 120. There 
was a small recess like a " false-door ” in the upper 
South chamber painted with blue vertical stripes, 
with red stripes up the angles of the sides. 

71. Tomb 211 (Middle Kingdom). This large 
tomb stood by itself to the North of cemetery A, 
and had been partially robbed. There were traces 
of a coffin and of a male skeleton, of which only 
the skull and the femora remained. In a corner of 
the chamber we found a very fine cylinder amulet, 
shewn full size on PI. XIV, 5. The core is of copper, 
and the gold casing very thick. On this casing are 
soldered small globules of gold to form a series 
of inverted triangles (University College London). 
A similar example of work is to be seen in the 
Cairo Museum, from Dahshur. With this were found 
the gold cowries and the cylinder amulet shewn on 
PI. XIV, to the left of the amulet described above. 
The cylinder consists of a copper wire threaded 
through green-felspar and lapis-lazuli discs, with 
gold caps at either end. A considerable number 
of amulets of this type were found in the tombs 
at Harageh. 

The dimensions of the tomb, together with the 
types of pottery and beads found in it, are given 
in the tomb-registers on PI. LIX. 

72. Tomb 264 (Middle Kingdom?). An untouched 
burial, which, however, may have been intruded 
into an earlier tomb. It contained two bodies, one 
of an adult female and the other of a fairly large 
child. The child’s body lay on the East of the 
chamber, with its head to North in a rough, plain 
wooden coffin, the body being fully extended ; on 
the West side Of the chamber lay a female body 
with head to South and face to West, also fully 
extended. This body was not contained in a coffin, 
but laid on sticks placed lengthways. At the West 
side of her head was a plain wooden box divided 
into four compartments to hold the canopic jars. 
No trace however was found of these. The box 
belonged to the original burial. 

73. House Ruin, Xlth dynasty, no. 53o (seeMap, 
. PI. II). The plan of this house could not be re¬ 
constructed, as only the foundations of one of the 



HOUSE DEPOSIT 


17 


rooms could be distinguished. It measured 165 E. 
by 95 N. At the lowest level, i. e. about 75 inches 
below the present desert-level, the following articles 
were found: 

A fisherman’s implements, consisting of a large 
quantity of net about one inch mesh, of similar tech¬ 
nique to those netted today, circular wooden floa¬ 
ters and bored stone sinkers of the forms shewn on 
PI. XI E—H, and wooden stakes of various lengths. 

A portrait head in serpentine, of which three 
views are shewn, slightly over full size, on Pl.X, i 3 . 
Although the ear is too large, and the features 
somewhat exaggerated, it is a very fine specimen 
of its class, and it is a great pity that the minute 
search did not give us the remainder of the figure. 

Several kohl pots in basalt, a broken one in 
limestone and two in alabaster of rough work. 
One had apparently had the lower part lost, and 
a rough piece of basalt had been drilled out to 
take its place. 

One basalt palette, PI. XI, A. 

Seven flint flakes. 

Bone mirror handle, PI. XXIII, i 3 . 

One lion bead in rough glazed pottery. 

Glaze ring, PI. XI, D. 

One duck(?) bead, PI. L, type 3 g. 

Pots of types 7n, i 3 m, 33 m, 36 b, Pis. XXXIV— 
XLI. 

Two scarabs, one with the red crown, nebs 
and plants, and one small double scarab with a 
scroll on one half, and Neb-Tawi-Re', Menthuhotep II 
on the other half. See PI. X, 4 and 5, also chap¬ 
ter VIII. 

Small piece of “Tell el Yahudiyeh,” incised white 
on black, pottery, shewn on PI. X, 15. 

I think that there is every likelihood that this 
is an Xlth dynasty group, and not post-XIth, both 
from the nature of the pottery, the basalt head, 
and from the name Neb-Tatvi-Re '. Scarabs of this 
name, greatly resembling that mentioned above, 
can be seen at the University College collection, 
London. (See Petrie, Scarabs, XI, 5, 2.) The frag¬ 
ment of foreign pottery is interesting, as I believe 
that it is one of the earliest dated pieces known. 

CHAPTER VII 

THE NEW KINGDOM SITES AND OBJECTS. 

74. With the exception of the town site to the 
North of the village of Harageh, there were few 


New Kingdom remains in the district; Gurob seems 
to have been the favorite cemetery of this period. 

The' site which gave most of the objects was 
the town site to the North-East of Harageh. This 
ancient village must have measured about 200 yards 
square, with its cemetery very close to the South 
of it. It seems to have been founded in the XVIIIth 
dynasty and continued down to XXIIIrd dynasty 
times; in this time it expanded so as partly to cover 
the graves. All the objects from this site are marked 
“N. H.” In the tomb registers on PI. LXIII, where 
no dimensions of graves are given, the group is 
from a house in the town. The majority of the 
pots and scarabs appear to run up to the time 
of Thutmose III. The dated objects are a scarab 
of Thutmose I (PI. XXI, 126) and a scarab of 
Thutmose III (PI. XXI, i 33 ) and grave 662, which 
is also dated to Thutmose III. Many groups of 
pottery and scarabs of the New Kingdom have 
been omitted owing to uncertainty as to their being 
of one date; when the graves lay under the village, 
great difficulty was found in determining if a group 
of objects were from the same burial. 

A curious drain of large pottery pipes, leading to 
a circular stone basin, was found in this town site. 

75. In cemetery B, about twenty New Kingdom 
graves were found in the Xllth dynasty shafts. 
The range of dates varied from Amenhotep I to 
Thutmose IV They were of comparatively poor 
quality, as no traces of coffins, either of pottery, 
brick or wood, were found. In one case, grave 291, 
the alabaster jars of the original occupant of the 
grave were re-used. In some of the examples, the 
Xllth dynasty remains were completely cleared out, 
only a sherd or so giving the date of the original 
burial; in other cases, only one chamber was cleared, 
leaving the already plundered Xllth dynasty re¬ 
mains as they were in the others. I believe that, 
almost without exception, all the New Kingdom 
graves in cemetery B were in older shafts. No ob¬ 
jects later than XVIIIth dynasty were found here. 

76. Very few groups from the Nazlet-es-Sa c adna 
cemeteries have been included in this volume, as 
the majority of the objects were so poor, and the 
graves so badly robbed, that they have very little 
archaeological interest. 

Those of the New Kingdom marked “D” are 
from a small tightly-packed cemetery about 50 yds. 
to the South of cemetery D at Dandyl. The pottery 
Pis. XLII—XLV has the name of the king at the 
bottom left-hand corner if the pot is dated. If the 





i8 


. SCARABS 


name is in brackets it shews that the particular 
type is characteristic of the reign. 

The objects from the New Kingdom graves are 
as follows: 

Note: All the graves are tabulated on PI. LXIII. 

77. PI. X, 10. Bright red polished pot in the form 
of a fish or bean, in grave 270 of early XVIIIth 
dynasty. This appears to be a foreign pot, as no 
polish of this type is known in Egypt. I can give 
no suggestion as to its plape of origin. 

PI. XII, 3 1. Potmark from grave 241. 

Fig. 37. Fragment of hieratic inscription on a pot 
from grave 647. (Not in tomb registers.) Beyond 
the fact that the letters r over n, the reed leaf 
Aleph, and the seated man appear, it is not possible 
to translate such a small fragment. 

PI. XXII, 3 . Painted limestone face of doubt¬ 
ful date. It occurred with the alabaster vase 88 
(PI. XLVIII). It appears to be the centre of a 
mummy cartonnage. These faces were made very 
small in the XVIIth dynasty, but this specimen 
must be about the smallest known. 

CHAPTER VIII 

SCARABS. 

78. The whole of the scarabs, scaraboids and 
cylinders found at Harageh, are drawn on Pis. XX 
and XXI. They are arranged, as far as possible 
according to types, specimens from one group, 
however, being in most cases placed together. 
Since we have only dated scarabs of the Xlth, 
mid XHth and XVIIIth dynasties, the arrangement 
of those of the intermediate periods is largely a 
matter of supposition, based on comparative types 
in other volumes; but the more one examines these 
supposed intermediate types, the less one cares to 
assert they are not XHth dynasty, much less to 
put them to a definite intermediate dynasty. Certain 
types however, such as nos. 73, 78, 87, 90—in, are 
almost certainly of the Second Intermediate Period. 

79. Figs. 1 and 2 are certainly pre-XIIth dynasty, 
from the amulets found with them, fig. 1 being 
probably older than fig. 2. These are shown with 
examples of their groups on PI. IX, 9, and PI. XIV, 
14, respectively. The inscriptions are not readable, 
and bear a strong likeness to the type of work 
seen on certain button seals. Examples of this can 
be seen in the University College collection, case 
320 , which are being published shortly. It is pos¬ 


sible that they, like some of the button seals, are 
of Syrian work imported, perhaps a little later than 
the button seals, into Egypt by the Semitic immi¬ 
grants who constituted the Vllth and VUIth dy¬ 
nasties. 

Figs. 3 and 4 come from the cemetery of Dandyl 
(see sects. 8 and 3 o), where nearly every object 
found might be of the Vlth dynasty, though of 
course they might extend well into the Second 
Intermediate Period. From this cemetery came 
button seals (graves 591 and 593), carnelian leg 
amulets, and pottery of the IVth—Xth dynasties, 
without any traces of later burials within 3 oo yards 
of it, except the Roman burials which partly dis¬ 
turbed the earlier graves. 

Fig. 3 is a scaraboid of a type sufficiently well 
known, which we have been accustomed to put in 
the XIVth dynasty, but which now appears to be 
Vlth—Xth dynasty. 

Fig. 4 is an example of a very large series of 
scarabs having a design of two Red Crowns on 
neb signs supporting some central object, in this 
case probably a Hathor head. It occurred with a 
pot (XXXII, 91) of light well polished buff ware, 
which in turn occurs with type 111, a typical First 
Intermediate type, which certainly does not come 
down as far as the Xlth dynasty. 

Fig. 5 is another of this series. It has the Red 
Crown and the neb, but in this case with two in¬ 
verted nebs and plants. A photograph of this is 
seen on PI. X, 4. This is dated to MenthuhotepII(?), 
as it occurs with fig. 6. (For the tomb group see 
sect. 73.) 

Fig. 6 is a double scarab from house ruin 530, 
one of the halves having Neb-Tawi Re , Menthu- 
hotep IV, Xlth dynasty (sect. 73), and the other 
half an S-spiral. 

Fig. 7 is another specimen of the Neb and Red 
Crown scarabs, this one being probably of the early 
XHth dynasty. The nebs in this case support a nefer. 
An example of the Neb, Red Crown and nefer scarab 
is also to be seen in the University College collection 
no. 518, the Neb and Crown being in the middle 
supported by two nefers. This was with a copper 
shell, and a disc and wire cylinder amulet, similar 
to that on PI. XIV, 2, the name of the owner being 
Bebut. 

This symmetrical type continues through the 
XHth dynasty, and probably well into the Second 
Intermediate Period; the later examples can be 
seen in nos. 63 —67. Scarabs 64—67 occurred in 


MIDDLE KINGDOM SCARABS 


19 


Wady I, and may well be post-XIIth dynasty, 
although there were no other objects to date them. 
Fig. 63 , however, occurs with the electrum amulet 
shewn on PI. XIV, 4, which places it almost cer¬ 
tainly in the Xllth dynasty. 

The plant, perhaps emblematic of Lower Egypt, 
occurs in the earliest examples, but scarabs intro¬ 
ducing the neb with the shen signs only. appear 
later. The red crown is often confused with the 
plants (see figs. 7 and 63 ), and appears finally to 
merge into the uzat-e ye (see 72 and 74), outside of 
the present series. The neb and red-crown designs 
were revived again in the New Kingdom in such 
forms as figs. 112, 173, 175 and 189 (PI. XXI). 

80. Fig. 8 (Petrie, Scarabs, PI. XVI, L) is of the 
“ Overseer of the House, Nimeh (?);” Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 9. Cylinder of Kha -Kheper-Re' , Senusert II, 
who is also called “Beloved of Sebek, Lord of 
Edfu.” (B. D. G. 33 g), grave 40. 

Fig. 10. Scroll scarab from grave 40; time, of 
Senusert II. 

Fig. 11. Bity-onkh-dad scarab from the same grave 
as no. 10. Figs. 10 and 11 are both well-known types, 
which may now be safely dated to Senusert II. 

Figs. 12 and 12 a. Small, coarse scarabs, perhaps 
reading Neb-Zeser-Re '; these are also dated to Senu¬ 
sert II by cylinder no. 9. 

Figs. 1 3 , 14, 15. Coarse cylinders of Senusert II. 

Fig. 16. Coarsely cut cylinder; name blundered 
but probably of Senusert II. 

Fig. 17. Cylinder of Senusert II and Senusert III, 
the titles being: “Son of Re', Lord of the Two 
Lands, Good God.” 

Figs. 18 and 19. Cylinders of Senusert III the 
titles in both being slightly blundered. 

Figs. 20 and 26. Cylinder combining the names 
of Neb-Kau-Re', Amenemhet II with Senusert III, 
both names being very carelessly cut. If my read¬ 
ing of these names is correct, the combination of 
these names cannot indicate a co-regency, as Senu¬ 
sert II comes between the two kings mentioned on 
the cylinder. 

Fig. 21. Cylinder of Senusert III and Amenem- 
hftt III. 

Fig. 22. Cylinder of Senusert III with blundered 
title. 

Figs. 23 and 24. Blundered flattened cylinders 
of Senusert II or III. 

Fig. 25. Cylinder of a Senusert, whose title is 
“The Good God, Lord of the Two Lands.” The 
glazing* and cutting is very inferior. 


Figs. 26—28. (26 = 20, repeated in error.) Group 
from grave 3 o 6 . See also PI. XIV, 3 . Date Senu¬ 
sert III. 

Fig. 29. Cylinder of Senusert III and Amenem- 
h6t III, the “Son of Re'” title being blundered. 

Fig. 3 o. Cylinder of Amenemhet III, giving nomen 
and prenomen. 

Figs. 3 1 and 32 . Half-cylinders of Ne-Maat-Re', 
Amenemhet III, “Lord of the Two Lands, Given 
Life.” 

Fig. 33 . Cylinder of Amenemhet III, entitled Sebek 
Shed(ti) mery. “Beloved by Sebek of Fayum City.” 

Fig. 34. Scroll scarab; Xllth dynasty. 

Fig. 35. Scarab of Smenu entitled Mer shen e neb 
“Overseer of all the Storehouses.” (See Petrie, 
Scarabs, PI, XIV, V.) 

Figs. 36 — 3 g. Scroll scarabs; Xllth dynasty. 

Figs. 40—42. Three scarabs from grave 275; 
Xllth dynasty. No. 41 (see Petrie, Scarabs, PI. XVI, 
AR), reads: Sesh ne Khent, Sekhem-Tehuti; “Scribe 
of the Khent, Sekhem-Tehuti.” No. 42 (ibid. XIV,W) 
reads -That; kher ne zaset(?), Ikh; “Vizier, Proclaimer 
of the Treasury, Ikh.” 

Fig. 43. Scroll scarab, dated to Senusert III, 
grave 91 (see fig. 22). 

Figs. 44—49. Scarabs from Wady I. Probably 
Xllth dynasty, but may be later. None of these 
had other objects by which to date them. 

Fig. 50. Scroll and nefer scarab from grave 244; 
cemetery B, Xllth dynasty. 

Figs. 51—53. Three varieties of the scroll and 
nefer scarab; fig. 51 is from cemetery S in a shallow 
grave, badly robbed; figs. 52 and 53 from Wady I; 
Xllth—XHIth dynasty. 

Fig. 54 belongs with figs. 72 and 74 to a series 
of asymmetrical scarabs having ka nefer together 
with other signs, which do not appear generally to 
be readable. (See University College collection 428.) 
Many of these have the uzat-e ye, which often is 
confused with the Red Crown, and the remainder 
of the field is filled with plants and other signs. 
I think these are certainly post-XIIth dynasty. 
The hetep is also a common sign in these scarabs. 
I think the ka nefer symmetrical scarabs are of 
nearly the same date, which might be put about 
the Xlllth dynasty. 

The neb-onkh-planX-shen series, which' nearly al¬ 
ways contain three of these signs, including the 
neb arranged symmetrically about the minor axis, 
appears to extend from mid-XIIth dynasty or 
earlier well into the Hyksos period, and is closely 

3* 


20 


THE HIEROGLYPHIC AND HIERATIC INSCRIPTIONS 


related to the neb and Red Crown series. Examples 
of this series are seen in figs. 63 — 66 . 

A small scarab, symmetrical about the minor 
axis with two nebs supporting plant scrolls, has 
been found with alabasters and beads of forms 
which are certainly pre-XIIth dynasty. The group 
is in the University College collection. This goes 
to shew the long range of this type of scarab. 

The symmetrical series 76—79 are almost cer¬ 
tainly post-XIIth dynasty, and are probably well 
into the Hyksos period; their features are selections 
from the following signs: nefer, uaz, shen, onkh, sut and 
dad, arranged symmetrically about the major axis. 

The “stage” scarabs, no. 90 (see Petrie, Hyksos 
and Israelite Cities, PI. IX, 147, 148), appear to be 
the next in order. 

Fig. 88 also probably belongs to this date, or 
perhaps slightly earlier, and is shewn in half-tone 
in Scarabs, PI. XVI, M. It reads: Sesh-ne-khent, Heh; 
“Scribe of the Khent; Heh.” The group in grave 291 
was extremely doubtful, as it occurred with fig. 1 23 , 
an ape-plaque, obviously of the New Kingdom. 

Figs. 91 and g2 (see Hyksos and Israelite Cities, 
PI. IX, 184) are still later; these, together with 
the degraded forms 94—in, are probably very 
nearly as late as the XVIIth dynasty. 

Figs. g 3 —95 are specimens of a group of eight 
green glaze scarabs and scaraboids which, by the 
pottery with them, might well be Xllth dynasty, 
in spite of their coarseness. The group is in the 
University College collection. 

It is to be noted that the vast majority of the 
post-XIIth dynasty scarabs occur in the closely 
crowded Wadys I and 2 and in the isolated graves. 

81. Figs. 112 and onwards are all of the New 
Kingdom, though a few, such as 151 and 189 may 
be older scarabs re-used. 

The scarabs dated to a king are seen in 125—138. 
128 is. probably a later use of the name Men 
Kkeper Re'. 

CHAPTER IX 

THE HIEROGLYPHIC 
AND HIERATIC INSCRIPTIONS. 

By Battiscombe Gunn. 

82. The inscriptions from El-Harageh are almost 
entirely funerary, and range chiefly from the First 
Intermediate Period to the Hyksos Period, with a 
few others of earlier and later times. They are 
mostly contained in Pis. LXIV—LXXX; 1 the re- 

1 Three other short inscriptions on Pls.VTII, XVIII, XIX (see § 98). 


productions in Pis. LXV—LXXVI, LXXVIII— 
TXXX are tracings of the originals, the rest being 
copies from notes without pretention to palaeo- 
graphical accuracy. Among the most interesting 
features may be mentioned the two small painted 
and inscribed tombs (Pis. LXVII—LXVIII), the 
fine steles of Nebpu, Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb and 
Itenhab 2 (Pis. LXXI—LXXIII) and the two pots 
of the Hyksos period with funerary spells in hieratic 
(Pis. LXXVIII—LXXIX). 

It has seemed advisable to include indexes of the 
names and titles (see PI. LXXXI as well as the 
Index under “Names” and “Titles”); in the follow¬ 
ing pages the latter are translated quite literally, an 
exception being made with hid ht, which is rendered 
“ Headman,” since it appears to correspond to the 
office of the modern 'omdeh, or headman of a town 
or village. 

For convenience’ sake the inscriptions are here 
dealt with under the following heads: Tombs, 
Coffins, Canopic Boxes, Steles, Canopic Jars, Small 
Objects, Hieratic Inscriptions and Papyri. 

TOMBS. 

83 . Painted tomb of Harishafnakht, no. 671, PI. 
LXVIII, (see also PI. VI, 6). Before the Xllth Dynasty. 
This tomb, like the adjacent one of Ukh(t)hotep, 
presumably Harishafnakht’s wife, was a small single 
chamber with vaulted roof of mud-brick, just below 
the surface of the ground. There was therefore no 
shaft; access was had by the north end. The de¬ 
signs and texts were painted or written directly 
on a coat of mud-plaster; the ground was thus 
mud colour. The colours of the paint are indicated 
in the plates by heraldic shading. 3 The tombs, 
which are of exactly the same type, are of special 
interest, as representing a hybrid form between 
the Middle Kingdom decorated and inscribed rock- 
tombs, and the more ornate coffins of the same 
period. 4 All the work is very crude and careless, 
most of all the writing of the spells, which is in 
some places degraded to a wild illegible scrawl. 5 

* Partly owing to the plates haring been printed off some time 
before the writing of the present chapter, there are a few variations 
between the names given at the head of the plates and those used 
in the text. 

3 See PI. LXXVIII, 9. Outside, the borders and at the bottom 
ran a band of red paint, not indicated in the plates. 

4 It should be noted that these tombs are hardly larger than the 
average inner coffins of the period. 

5 This is doubtless partly due to the great difficulty of writing 
on a vertical surface quite close to the ground in a chamber some 
26 inches wide. The facsimiles were made with considefable care. 



TOMB OF BARISHAFNAKHT 


21 


In the spells themselves many omissions seem to 
have been made. 

East side. Harishafnakht seated before a table 
of offerings, beside which is written vertically “ The 
equipment of the table 1 is for thy ka.” Horizontal 
line above, “A thousand loaves, jugs of beer, oxen 
and geese for the honoured one Harishafnakht.” 
Over the remainder of the east side runs: “ An 
offering that the king gives to Osiris, Lord of 
Busiris, the Great God, Lord of Abydos—the com- 
ing-forth-at-the-voice offerings of bread, beer, cakes, 
oxen and geese, of 2 the honoured one Harishaf¬ 
nakht.” Facing the deceased, behind the table, is 
the representation, usual in figured tombs, of the 
performance of funerary rites by several priests. 
Over the first figure are two words (miw si) 3 which 
may mean either “poured-out water,” or “water, 
a libation” in the “account-style.” The words “fire 
and incense ” 4 have been wrongly placed over the 
second figure; the priest presenting incense with 
a censer, to whom this superscription of course 
belongs, has been omitted. Next is seen the “ lector- 
priest ” or “ ritualist ” ( hri-hb ), with hand upraised 
in the act of pronouncing the “ offering-that-the- 
King-gives ” formula; in his other hand should be 
a papyrus-roll, but this has here been erroneously 
assimilated in form to the object carried by the 
priest shown behind him. The latter, the Sem, is 
performing the rite called int rd, “bringing the foot,” 
which probably means “ removing footprints.” He 
is most often represented with face turned back¬ 
wards; in one hand he holds a papyrus-roll, with 
the other he drags behind him what, when care¬ 
fully drawn, is seen to be a bundle of reeds or 

1 I. e., the food thereon; dbht-htp, “ that which the table needs 
(lit., asks for).” That this term refers to what is placed on the table, 
and not, as stated by Gardiner, Notes on Sinuhe, 70, to the table 
with what is upon it, seems to be shown clearly both by the 
meaning of the words and by the determinatives in Gardiner’s 
examples. I do not agree with Gardiner, loc. cit., that the term is 
used for “ altar ” even in dbht-lttp m nb hr hd, Sethe, Urkunden, 
IV, 22, which I would render, with the assumption of a slight 
change of meaning, “ a table-set (i. e., the vessels for a table) of 
gold and silver.” 

4 For this variation of the formula, with the genitive nt instead 
of the dative n, cf. Lacau, Sarcophages anterieurs au Nouvel Empire 
(Cairo Catalogue), I, 48, 52, 55, 56, 71, II, 72, 73, 89, 91; Amamu, 
Pis. 7, 18; Aeg. Inschriften . . . zu Berlin, I, 244, 245. 

3 A variation (borrowed from the offering-list) of the usual rdit 
kbh, “presenting lustral water.” 

4 Ht sntr, for which cf., e. g., Naville, Deir el Bahari, PI. no. 

In the Middle Kingdom more usually sntr ht “censing the fire” 

when the word ht is used, cf. e. g . El Bersheh, I, Pis. 32 , 34. 


grass tied together and reaching to the ground. 5 
Over these figures is a spell in twelve lines, of 
which the following can be made out or conjec¬ 
tured : “ Speech: ‘Harishafnakht sits down to render 
judgment in the presence of Geb, as Horus; ... his 
head; [his] mother Isis has borne him, Bebnut(?) 
has been pregnant (?) with him ... Horus has been 
cradled ... Osiris Harishafnakht is.. .’.” 6 The right- 
hand half of the east side is filled by the offering-list. 

West side. At the top a damaged line of hiero¬ 
glyphs, “ An offering that the King gives to Anubis 
who is upon his hill, &c., that he may give the 
beautiful burial of the honoured one Harishafnakht.” 7 
Below this is a series of articles of adornment, 
clothing, and the toilet, weapons &c., with their 
names written over them, and set out on three tables. 
Beginning at the right, we have: 

1. A “head-rest” ( wrs). s 

2. A “ mirror of silver ” (fnh fid). 

3 . A “ mirror of bronze ” (fnh bif). On these 
mirrors is written indistinctly “ The honoured 
one Harishafnakht.” 

4. A “ collar of lapis-lazuli ” {wsh Mbd). 

5. A “ collar-counterpoise ” ( mnht ). 9 

6. A “ collar of variegated work (?) ” (j v&h ni 

*[*»])• 

7. A counterpoise to this collar, without super¬ 
scription. 

8. A pair of “bracelets” (mnfrt nt <i[rt] IO ), be¬ 
tween them (9) a bead on a cord. 

10. A pair of “anklets” {mnfrt nt rd), with (11) 
similar cord. 

12, 1 3 . Two arm-ornaments of different shapes, 
names damaged. 11 

5 On this rite see Davies-Gardiner, The Tomb of Amenemhet, g 3 . 

‘ Dd mwdiv : hms , ]Iri-sf-nht r wd e mwdtv m blh Gb, Hr is ... 
tpf, mf-n siv miwt[f]Ist, iwr(?)-n sw flbmvt(?)... Sty JTr, iw...Wsir 
Hri-sf-nfyt ... I have not been able to find a parallel to this text; 
cf., however, the beginning and end of a spell, published Lacau, 
Sarcophages, n, 66-7. 

7 Cf. Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 11. 8 Cf. Ukh(t)botep’s tomb. 

5 "With this writing of the word m'nfyt compare the curious 
writings minh,t (m-nh,t?), Lepsius, Alteste Texte, Pis. 40, 41, 42. 

10 Usually e wi, cf. Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 162, s. v. mnfrt. 

11 These are evidently the e dnt and the hldrt ( hldrt ), respectively, 
of the M. K. coffins, see the references Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 
158, 165, sub vocc. The e dnt is sometimes curved upwards, with 
cords hanging down, outwards; the hldrt, while usually figured as 
here, is also drawn (Cairo 28092, no. 45) with the rectangular form 
of the c dnt, and is called hldrt r 'f, “the hldrt on his arm.” The 
two objects are placed between a pair of bracelets or anklets 
Amamu, PI. 22, left, and the rectangular one is named 'dt. The 
word hldrt {hldrt) may well mean “the ft (-object of the hand,” 
and in spite of its appearance is evidently not a collar. 



22 


TOMBS 


14, 15. Two tall vases, white and black, with 
stoppers; superscription to be read perhaps 
“vase of silver, and of bronze(?)” (hst nt hd, 
nt MS P). 1 

16, 17. A ewer and basin. 2 

18. A tall vase of breccia. 3 4 5 

19. A “ mnit-ornament.” ( mn\it\ ). + 

20. Two “ bows ” (pdt). s 

21. Two crossed “arrows” ( c hSn>). s 

22. Four bundles of “ garments ” or “ stuffs ” 
(hbsw ?). 6 

23 . 24. Two pairs of sandals. 

Beneath these objects are about thirty-five vertical 
lines of spells, the titles being written above them 
horizontally in the spaces between the legs of each 
table. There appear to have been three titles; all 
are quite illegible. The first spell (on the right) 
commences: “ Speech: ‘ Ho, thou Harishafnakht! 
thy sight has been opened by Horus 7 that thou 
mayest look towards every place; the Sem-priest 
has opened thine ears (that thou mayest hear) every¬ 
thing good. Thou shalt spiritualize Harishafnakht 
with that spiritualization of thine wherewith Horus 
spiritualized Osiris... whereby he... stand... where¬ 
by he .. 8 

South end. Above, a horizontal line, “ May com- 
ing-forth-at-the-voice offerings of bread, beer, cakes, 
oxen and geese be for 9 * the honoured one Hari¬ 
shafnakht.” Below this, “ A spell for justification in 
the Necropolis.” The spell begins “ Speech: ' The 

1 Cf. the references Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 166, s. v. hst. 

2 These are the Ifsmny and the s'wti, or the hsmny ni nb and 
the i e wti m bil, the “natron-vessel of gold” and the “basin of 
bronze”; cf. Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 166, 169; Amamu, PI. 23 . 

3 This is perhaps the mgrg, which, however, usually has two 
handles; cf. Lacau, Sarcophages, II, i 63 , s. v .; Lepsius, Alteste 
Texte, Pis. 11, 43. 

4 Cf, for the form, Lacau, Sarcophages, II, figs. 479, also 478, 
475; Amamu, PI. 23 , left. 

5 These two names have been transposed. 

* Cf. Lacau, Sarcophages, II, fig. 364; Amamu, PI. 24. 

7 For this sentence cf. Pyramids, 555 a. 

8 I propose to read: — Dd mwdw: hi Jfri-sf-nht pn, wn hr-k 
in Hr ml k r dr bw nb; sn im msdnvi-ki {sdm-k) iht nb(t) nfrt. 
S)h,-k Hri-sf-nht m slh-k piv s)h-n Hr Wsir im ... nf im '#*(?) . . . 
nf im. This text is strongly reminiscent of those of the “Opening 
the Mouth ” group, but I have not identified it there or elsewhere. 

9 The text has nt, “ of,” instead of n, “ to, for ”; for this 
variation in the same context cf. also Lacau, Sarcophages, I, 42, 
45 . 49 > 5<>, 57, 61; Amamu, Pis. II, 26; Aeg. Inschriften ... zu Berlin, 
I, 244, 245. It is difficult not to believe that nt is in these cases a 

traditional error for n. It may be pointed out here that nt is 

certainly an error for n in the short horizontal line to the left of 

the east side of Ukh(t)liotep’s tomb. 


two doors of... are opened,’ ” and is perhaps iden¬ 
tical with Pyramids , 194 foil. 

84. Painted tomb of Ukh(t)hotep IQ no. 672, PI. 
LXVII (see also PI. VI, 6). Nearly identical in form, 
dimensions and arrangements of designs and texts 
with the preceding (cited below as “ H.”). 

East side. The deceased seated at table, as in 
H. Beside the food the same vertical inscription, 
but with omission of the last words, n ki t (to thy 
ka). Above this scene, “ A thousand loaves, a thou¬ 
sand jugs of beer and oxen and geese be for 11 the 
honoured one, Ukh(t)hotep.” Over this again a 
damaged line beginning “An offering that the King 
gives to Osiris, Lord of Abydos, the Great God,...” 
as in H.; since, however, this line begins further 
back than in H., either the text must have been 
more developed, or the signs must have been 
widely spaced out, as in H., west side. The re¬ 
presentation of funerary rites is even more garbled 
than in H.; the second and third figures are trans¬ 
posed, so that the water is being thrown over the 
head of the incense-burning priest, and the pourer 
of water is wrongly styled “ lector-priest ” ( hri-hb ) 
this title belonging to the last figure, who, with 
uplifted hand, pronounces the “ offering-that-the- 
King-gives” formula. The ceremony of “removing 
footprints ” is omitted. Differing from H., this side 
is inscribed with no spell, all the remaining space 
being occupied by a longer offering-list. 

West side. Above, a damaged line of text pro¬ 
bably identical with that of H. The objects on the 
three tables differ but little from those in H.; the 
mirrors are inscribed “ the honoured one, Ukh(t)- 
hotep,” the collars and counterpoises are given in 
greater detail, the second of the two hst-vases is 
coloured red instead of black, the breccia vase 
( mgrg} ) of H. is replaced by a yellow vase (?) on 
a wooden stand, and after the crossed arrows is 
seen a yellow rectangular object not given in H. 12 
In the superscriptions the words “mirror of bronze ” 

10 The reading of this name is not quite certain. The first element 
is written differently each time it occurs in the tomb„ both in 
formal and cursive hieroglyphs; in the former cases it is followed 
by a t, but not in the latter. It seems most probable that it stands 
for the wh-sign. Ukhhotep as a name — usually, however, of men— 
is not uncommon in the Middle Kingdom, cf., e. g., Lacau, Sarco¬ 
phages, II, 152 — 3 , Louvre C. 187. On the god Ukh see Chassinat 
in Rec. de Trav., 25, 62 foil. 

11 See last note but one, end. 

12 Compare the rectangular objects, placed in a similar position 
in the series, Amamu, Pis. 23 (yellow, as here and showing grain 
of planed wood; a board?), 24. 



TOMB OF UKH(T)-]JOTEP 


23 


( f n h bis) are replaced by “ mirror of one who looks 
at the face ” ('nJ} ni mSS h.r), and the extra space 
thus taken up has helped to crowd out the names 
of the objects between the “ collar of lapis-lazuli ” 
and the “ bracelets.” Below are forty-three vertical 
lines of spells, with three titles written horizontally 
between the table-legs. The first title (right) is the 
familiar “ Coming out by day ” (prt m hrw), and 
the spell begins “ Speech: ' Ho, Osiris Ukh(t)hotep, 
[the doors of] heaven are opened 1 to [thee], [the 
doors of earth] are opened [to thee], the bolts of 
Geb (?) are opened to thee 1 cf. Book of the 
Dead , Spell 68. The title of the second spell is 
illegible to me, and of the title only a sign here and 
there is left. The title of the third begins with smS 
“ killing (?),” a word which occurs twice in the last 
line but two of the spell itself. Of the latter I can 
read hardly anything; Ukh(t)h.otep is said to spend 
a time , her name occurs two lines further on, later 
she is said to sit down, and in the last line she is 
perhaps said to preside over the two palaces . 2 I have 
failed to identify this spell. 

South end. At the top the same formula as in 
H., south end. Below this are two spells. The first 
is entitled “ Not dying in the Necropolis,” 3 and 
begins “Ho, Ukh(t)hotep . . .” The second is entit¬ 
led “Causing to go down(?) . . .,” 4 and appears tc 
begin by identifying the members of the deceased 
with those of gods in the form X-t m Y ; see in 
the second line “ thy hands are . . .” and in the 
fifth “ thy body is ...” 5 Both spells unidentified. 

COFFINS. 6 

85. Coffin of SenuserFonkh, Tomb 250, PI. LXX. 
The hieroglyphs, lines and pair of eyes were not 
incised, but were boldly traced in thick blue paint 
by a skilled hand. In the third vertical columr/ 
of the east side the name appeared to have be<& 
done with paint of a different consistency, and at 
the top of the south end it is wrongly written. 
The coffin thus perhaps formed part of an under¬ 
taker’s stock, or was family property, the name 
being filled in later. 

1 Dd mwdw: hi Wsir Wh-htp, wn n-[t' 1 wi] pt, wn [n-t '}wi tl, 
w\n n-t kl[rt\ Gb(?)... 

2 Dd mwdw: ... ir (or Wsir ?) iS/h-htp It ir ... Wh-htp ... hms t 
... Wh-htp (?) butt Itrti (?) 

3 Tm mwt m Hr-ntr. 4 Rdit hi (?)... 

‘ Dd mwdw: .. , c wi-t [m] ( 1 . 2) ... -t ni ( 1 . 3 )... ht-t (or dt-t -?.) 

m ( 1 . 5 ) .. . 

6 All inscriptions are incised unless otherwise stated. 


Band on lid. “Speech; 7 ‘Thy mother Nut spreads 
herself over thee by her name of “ Lake (?) of 
Heaven 8 ”. She causes thee to be a god, there 
being no enemies 9 of thine, by thy name of “ God ”. 
May she preserve thee from any evil thing, by her 
name of “Preserver ( fem .) of the great One”. 10 
Thou art the great one among her children.’ ” 

West side. Horizontal line. “An offering that 
the King gives to Anubis, Lord of Life, Lord of 
the Holy Ground, who is in the place of embalm¬ 
ment, who presides over the god’s pavilion, in all 
(cult-) places of his, that he may give a goodly 
burial in the Western Desert of the Necropolis, for 
the ka 5 of him who is in honour with Anubis, the 
Great God, this Senuserfionkh, possessor of honour.” 
Vertical lines, left to right. “Speech b[y Im]seti: 

‘ Horus protects thee. Thou whom he loves, thou 
art become [his?] /; *aV” “Speech by Gebeb: 11 ‘I 
have come 12 to prevent anything from befalling thee 
evilly for ever.’’? “Speech by Nut: ‘Osiris gives 
me this SenuserFonkh that I may embrace him.”’ 13 
“ Speech by Kabhsnewef: ‘ Mayest thou be glad of 
her, 14 thou whom I love.’ ” 

North end. Horizontal line. “Speech by Isis; ‘I 
have come to take hold of thee and to give thee 
thy heart for ever.’ ” 15 Vertical lines, right to left. 
“ Speech: 16 ‘ We have come to adore thee. Thou 
must not ever go away from us.’ ” “ Speech: ‘I have 
come ...; 17 1 do not withdraw from the place where 
[thou art, ever].’ ” 

East side. Horizontal line. “‘An offering that the 
King gives to Osiris, Lord of Abydos, that he may 

7 The oldest copy of this spell, which, to judge from the fre¬ 
quency of its occurrence, was evidently considered to be of peculiar 
efficacy, is probably Pyramids, 638 . 

8 Written in the Pyramids as the name of a town. 

9 The disposal of the consonants of this word here and elsewhere 
(e. g .„Aeg. Inschriften aus den kgl. Museen zu Berlin, I, 237], with 
the/beginning a new “ square,” deserves note as supporting Sethe’s 
view, Verbum, I, 217,1, that the writings hff, “ in front of,” .“enemy,” 
are not mere graphic variations of hft, hfti, but represent real 
metathetic forms htf, htfi (cf. Coptic shatfe, “ enemy,” beside shafte). 

10 The name of a pillow (note the determinative), cf. Lacau, 
Sarcophages, II, 167. The paranomasia with this term is continued 
with wr “ great one ” (i. e., greatest) in the next sentence. 

11 An unusual writing of the name of the Earth-god; cf. Mace- 
Winlock, The Tomb of Senebtisi, 36 . 

12 The writing of this word, here and elsewhere on this coffin, 
is noteworthy; cf. Cairo Coffin 28099. 

13 Or, this Osiris S. has been given to me that I may embrace him. 

14 Nut. 15 Cf. Pyramids, 3 c. 

16 This and the following speeches are said by Isis and Neph- 
thys; cf. Pyramids, 63 i, 1635, 1634. 

17 Ibwi tl, or ib. ib til This is quite obscure to me. 



24 


COFFINS 


give coming-forth-at-the-voice offerings, thousands 
of bread, beer, oxen, geese, thread, cloth, cold 
water, incense, oil, abundant offerings, oblations, 
every growing thing, every good and pure thing 
whereon a god lives, every day for ever, for the 
kd of the honoured one, this justified Senusert- 
f onkh, the possessor of honour.” Vertical lines, right 
to left. " Speech to Dwamautef: ' I have come to 
adore thee . . . for ever.’ ” " Speech by Tefenet: 
* I have come, rejoicing 1 in the love of thee for 
ever.’” 2 "Speech by Show: 'Osiris, SenuserFonkh, 
may heaven never be void of thee.’ ” 3 "Speech by 
Hapi: ' Thou shalt be cared for,...’ ” 

South end. Horizontal line. "Speech by Neph- 
thys: ' Come, that we may take hold of the head 
of our beloved Osiris, justified Senusertfonkh).’ ” 
Vertical lines, left to right. "Speech; 4 'Ho, Great 
One, I have come to take hold of thee and to give 
thee [thy] heart [for] ever! ’” " Speech: ' Thou 
(fem.) art the mourner (Jem.), the weeper, th[ou 
art] 3 6 ...’” 

86. Painted coffin, Tomb 347, PI. LXIX. This well- 
painted coffin had no inscription on the outside, 
and was probably an inner coffin. On the interior 
vertical surfaces a number of objects are repre¬ 
sented arranged on wooden stands or boxes. The 
names of these objects, which originally ran above 
the latter in horizontal lines, are now almost entirely 
destroyed with the exception, in B, ofj vrs, "head¬ 
rest,” and nfwf "fan.'’ The objects are as follows:— 

B. (head end): Lower register, four 7 jars; upper 
register, a head-rest and two fans. 

C. (foot end): Three 'wA-amulets (sandal-thongs ?). 

D. : right to left, two ornamental collars, two 
staves, a mirror, a harp, 8 four bundles of cosmetics, 
pairs of bracelets and anklets. 

E. After the false door a table loaded with, food- 
offerings ; under it two ewers, rolls of cloth (three 
partly unrolled), three bundles, two sceptres, 9 two 
wigs. 

1 JH'-kwi. 3 Cf. Pyramids, 1787. 

3 Cf. Pyramids, 733 d, also 363 c, 1455c. 

4 Said by Nephthys, cf. Pyramids, 1786; 

5 Reading tmt flit, rmt; tmt ..., with t error for r, influenced 
by preceding tmt. An alternative is to read tmt flit, tmt rm-t..., 

“ thou art the mourner, it is thou who shalt weep ..with ab¬ 
breviated writing of rm. Cf. Pyramids, 1791. 

6 Usually nft, see Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 164. 

7 Usually seven. 

8 This is rare on M. K. coffins; Lacau, Sarcophages, seems to 
give only one case (I, 204, no. 38 ). 

9 The wis and the d c m. 


The colours are indicated by the shading (see 
PI. LXXVII, 9). 10 

87. Inscriptions from various coffins. From the 
palimpsest coffins of Iti, Tomb 87, Pis. LXV, 1; 
LXXVII, 2. The inscriptions of Neferunt..., good 
name Iha 3 , the original occupant, were probably 
smoothed over with a filling of plaster, and thus 
concealed; 11 one or two of the signs were still sq 
filled when the coffin was found. In the two broken 
end-boards (outer coffin) shown on the left of 
PI. LXV, the surface was rubbed down from a point 
immediately after the words smr w'ti, onwards, to 
efface the inscriptions. The later texts were deeply 
incised, and. both earlier and later were originally 
filled in with white paint. PI. LXV, 1, left; earlier: 
" The Unique Companion, the Servant of the Red 
Crown, Neferunt..., whose good name is Iha\” 
Surcharges: “ The Headman, who is in honour with 
the Great God, Iti.” " The Headman, the Unique 
Companion, Overseer of a Thousand, Iti.” PI. LXV, 1, 
right; what remains is identical with the former of 
the two texts just rendered. PI.LXXVII,2(1). "[An 
offering that the King gives to Anubis... Lord of 
the] Holy [Ground,] that he may be well buried in 
the good [West] in his tomb of the Necropolis, 
the Unique Companion, the Headman, in honour 
with the Great God, Iti ” (inner coffin). (2). " An 
offering that the King gives to Anubis. who is 
upon his hill, who is in the place of embalmment, 
Lord of the Holy Ground, that [he may be] buried 
well in [his] to [mb of the Necropolis ...] ” (outer 
coffin). ( 3 ). "... the overseer of prophets, Iti...” (4). 
"...[that he may pass over the fair roads] over 
which the honoured ones [pass], in peace ...” 

From the coffin of Satimpi(?), PI. LXV, 2. A 
version of a funerary formula of which good ex¬ 
amples occur Ann. du Serv., Ill, 207 (pyramidion of 
Amenemmes), Lacau, op. cit., I, 80. "Speech: 'The 
arms of Anubis, who is upon his hill, be about 
the Osiris Satimpi(?), whom(?) the Western Desert 
enfolds 12 within the Retreat (km), the possessor of 
peace. He who is in her (the Desert) is happy ; may 
she cause Osiris this Satimpi(?) to inherit ever- 

10 Note also that the ground of the exterior decoration (A) is 
yellow; and that the outline of the mirror (D), the strings of the 
harp (D), and the outline of the round cake on the tray (E) are red. 

11 Cf. Lacau, Sarcophages, II, 65, note 1, 74, note I; Lefebvre 
in Ann. du Serv., i 3 , 11 foil. 

11 Hnmrv, as in the Amenemmes version; qy. relative form not 
altered to feminine? Lacau, loc. cit., has dif hnm sw smt imntt, 

“ that he may cause the Western Desert to enfold him.” 



COFFINS 


25 


lasting and eternity, she (S.) being alive for 
ever.’ ” 1 

Coffin of Mereri, Tomb 145, PI. LXV, 3 . 

(A) . “An offering that the King gives to Osiris, 
Lord of Busiris, that offerings may come forth at 
the voice for him who is in honour with the Great 
God, Lord of Heaven, the Headman, the Overseer 
of a Thousand, Mereri.” 

(B) . ” An offering that the King ^gives to Anubis 
who presides over the god’s paviliort, that offerings 
may come forth at the voice for the Headman, the 
Companion, Overseer of Priests, Overseer of a 
Thousand [Mereri].” 

(C) . “ An offering that the King gives to Anubis 
who is upon his hill, who is in the place of em¬ 
balmment, Lord of the Holy Ground, that he may 
be well buried in his tomb of the Necropolis, he 
who is in honour, the Headman, the Companion, 
Mereri.” 

(D) . “The Headman, the Companion, Overseer 
of a Thousand, Mereri.” (E) “The Headman, Com¬ 
panion, Overseer of Priests, Mereri.” (F). “ He who 
is in honour with the Great God, Mereri.” 

Unnamed coffin, Tomb87, Pl.LXVI. BeforeXllth 
Dynasty. List of offerings, of the usual type, written 
in ink, much faded. 

From the coffin of Thau, Tomb 87, PI. LXXVII, 1. 

(1) . “An offering that the King gives to Anubis, 
Lord of Abydos, (for) a good burial (in) his tomb 
of the Necropolis, he who is in honour with the 
Great God, Lord of Heaven, the Headman, the 
Unique Companion, Thau.” (2). “...the Overseer 
of a Thousand, Tha[u].” ( 3 ). Part of an offering- 
list, mentioning four of the sacred oils. 

From the coffins of Ihynes, Tomb 151, Pl.LXXVII, 
3 . (1). Outer coffin, west side: “An offering that the 
King gives to Osiris, Lord of Busiris, (for) a good 
burial in his tomb of the Necropolis, he who is in 
honour with the Great God, Lord of Heaven ...” 

(2) . Inner (?) coffin, east side: “An offering that 
the King gives to Anubis, who is upon [his hill], 
who is in the place of embalmment, Lord of the 

1 For h,m nb htp nfr imi-s di -6 iv[<] NN. &c., Amenemmes has 
hm nb fitp nfr imi-s di-i i'wf nb nhh fir dt, “ the Retreat, the 
possessor of peace; he who is in her is happy; may she give him 
all his heritage (?) for ever and ever.” Lacau, loc, cit., has h,m nfr 
nb lritpw imi is ni hr-ntr di-f w e NN. nhh dt: “ the fair Retreat, 
possessor of peace; he who is in the tomb of the Necropolis, may 
he cause NN. to inherit everlasting and eternity.” Cf. however, 
Lacau, op. cit., II, 81, nos. 2 and 3 , where after nfr imi-f the text 
proceeds quite differently with NN. n 6 k rn -6 dt, “NN. may her 
name never perish!” 


Holy [Ground],...” ( 3 ). Inner coffin, foot end. 
“ The Headman, the Unique Companion, Ihynes.” 
A fragment (not published) mentions Ihynes as 
hri-fyb, “ Lector-priest.” 

From the coffin of Hesy, PI. LXXVII, 4. “An 
offering that the King gives to Osiris, Lord of 
Busiris, that offerings may come forth well at the 
voice in her tomb of the Necropolis, she who is 
in favour with Ptah-Socharis, the Unique Adorner(?) 
of the King, 2 Hesy.” 

From the coffin of Harfiotep (?), PI. LXXVII, 5. 
From east side of coffin. “An offering that the King 
gives to Osiris, Lord of Busiris, Foremost of the 
Westerners, Lord of Aby[dos,].... [in] his tomb of 
the Necropolis in the Land of the West, the 
Headman, the Unique Companion, Harhotep (?) 3 .” 
Written in ink only; rather rough work. 

From a pottery coffin, Ghorab, PI. LXXVII, 6. Of 
this inscription only the words dd-mdw, “ Speech,” 
Wsir, “ Osiris,” and ntr % “ the Great God,” are 
intelligible to me. It is perhaps a spell-written in 
some form of “ enigmatic writing.” 4 

From box-coffin,Tomb 173,Pls.LXXIV,LXXVII, 
7. (a) In hieratic. 5 Apparently the name, Im f abim 
(im'bim .,.). This is worthy of note, for if, as seems 
probable, it is a personal name, it is evidently a 
foreign one, and at this early period (perhaps 
IVth Dyn.) it is written throughout in “alphabetic ” 
signs, and not, as in later times, in the so-called 
“ syllabic ” writing, (b) “ Parcel of... (?).” 

From a coffin, Tomb 246, LXXV, 1. “ This f Am u, 
possessor of honour.” Noteworthy for the name, 
“ The Asiatic.” 6 

A few inscribed fragments of coffins, containing 
only small portions of the usual funerary formulae, 
and without legible personal names, are not re¬ 
produced, being devoid of any interest. 

2 Cf. Louvre stela C. 15 (left), Ann. du Serv. i 3 , 11, Lacau, 
Sarcophages, II, 155, and on the title see Spiegelberg in Zeitschr. 
f. ag. Spr., 34, 162 foil. 

3 The last sign is quite abnormal, but is perhaps a sportive 
variant of the (itp-sign, the usual form of loaf being replaced by a 
circular one. 

* On the “ enigmatic ” writing see especially Sethe in Northamp- 
TON-SPiEGEi-BERG-NEWBERRy, Excavations in the Theban Necro¬ 
polis, 3 * foil. The writing of this inscription seems, however, to 
have nothing in common with the “ enigmatic ” inscriptions hitherto 
studied; the circle with plural sign, the doubled n-sign, and the 
group h(?)-r-di(?) are perhaps single elements. The last three signs 
might be read dw)-wi, “ very early.” 

5 Placed here, and not under “ Hieratic Inscriptions,” for con¬ 
venience. 

6 Pn is perhaps part of the name. 


4 


26 


CANOPIC BOXES—STELES 


CANOPIC BOXES. 

88. i. Wooden Box of Senusert'onkh, Tomb 250, 
PI. LXIV. 

Across lid. “ Speech: ‘ Horus places thee at the 
head of the gods; he causes thee to conquer; thou 
art the lord.’ 1,1 

First side. Horizontal line. “Speech: 'Horus 
comes to thee accompanied by 2 his children, Hapi, 
Dwamautef, Imseti and Kabhsnewef.’ ” 3 Vertical 
lines. Left. “ Speech: ' They bring [to thee] that 
name of thine of “Imperishable”. 4 ”’ Right. “Speech 
by the children of Horus: '[We are] happy [be¬ 
cause of thee].’ ” 3 

Second side. Horiz. line. “ Speech by the Children 
of Horus; ' We will be with thee; thou must not 
ever go away from us.’” 6 Vert, lines. “Speech: 
‘[We?] have come . . . (rest destroyed).’” 

Third side. Horiz, line. “Speech; ‘Horus gives 
thee all his children that they may carry 7 thee, 
and that thou mayest have them at thy disposal.’ ” 8 
Vert, lines. “Speech: '[Horus?] has given to 
thee (rest destroyed). 

Fourth side. Horiz. line. “Speech: 'Children [of 
Horus, approach] yourselves to your father Osiris, 
[this Senusert'onkh].’ ” 9 Vert, lines destroyed. 

As the footnotes show, these texts are mostly 
quoted or adapted from old spells dealing with 
the four Children of Horus, with whom the four 
“ Canopic jars ” containing the viscera are identified. 

2. Wooden Box of Yamyt, Tomb 280, PI. LXIV. 

A series of short, similar texts in which “ the 
married woman, Yamyt,” who is once styled “ the 
justified,” and once “possessor of honour,” is de¬ 
signated as “ she who is in honour with ” Osiris 
the Great God, Osiris, Ptah[-Socharis], Anubis who 
is upon his hill, the Greater Ennead, the Lesser 
Ennead, Tefenet, Nephthys, Hapi and Imseti. The 
vertical lines on the north side perhaps contained 
the names Dwamautef and Kabhsnewef. A similar 
line ran across the lid, but only the first word 
imiht remains. 

1 This is the obvious translation of the text as it stands; the 
last part is however corrupt, see Pyramids, 648. 

* Literally, “ equipped with,” “ completed by.” 

3 See Pyr., 2101, which has, however, biwf, “his souls,” for mswf. 

4 Read n-k] rn-k (p)w nl Ihm-sk, as in Pyr., 2102; 

this “ speech ” and the preceding are consecutive in the Pyramids. 

5 Restore, perhaps, htp-min hr-k. 6 Apparently not in Pyr. 

1 Read fpsn. 8 Cf. Pyr., 1828—9, 6 i 9 > 63 7. 

9 Restoring Msw [Hr, ims <n] r it-tn Wsir, [Sn-wsrt-'nh pri], 
Cf. Pyr., 1829 c, for ims in this connection. 


STELES. 

(All of White Limestone.) 

89. Stele of Nebpu, Tomb 41, Pis. LXXI and 
XXIV,2. ix’5 cm. thick. Xllth dynasty. At top:— 

“ An offering that the King gives to Hezhotep for the 
ka of the room-keeper (iri e i) of the Treasury, Nebpu. 
An offering that the King gives to Ptah for the ka 
of the Wardrobe-keeper Nebpu. An offering that 
the King gives to Anubis, Lord of Shespet, 10 for 
the ka of the Councillor of the God, 11 Nebpu. An 
offering that the King gives to Khentekhtay, Lord 
of Kemwey, 12 for the ka' of the Overseer of Sealers, 
Nebpu. An offering that the King gives to the 
King of Upper and Lower Egypt, KhaTcheperre', 
for the ka of the . . . I3 Nebpu, son of Imi (fern.).” 

Second Register. Two men seated at a table of 
offerings, beneath which are two water-jars, stop¬ 
pered and having flowers twined about them. It 
seems necesary to suppose that both figures re¬ 
present Nebpu: the left-hand one will hardly be 
the “ butler Sonb ” of the short vertical inscription 
which begins behind his chair and runs down into 
the register below,, as this appears to be an after¬ 
thought, which is not the case with the represen¬ 
tation. 

Third Register. On each side a man seated at 
a table bearing bread and fruit, with water-jars 
as above. Over the right and left-hand tables re¬ 
spectively run the inscriptions“ An offering that 
the King gives to Anubis, Lord of Shespet, that 
he may give bread, beer, oxen, fowl and cakes 
for the ka of the Temple-overseer, the justified 
Pepi, the possessor of honour.” “ An offering that 
the King gives tb Osiris, the Great God, Lord of 
Abydos, that he may give bread, beer and cakes 
for the ka of the baker (?), 14 the justified Senebni.” 
The two scenes are separated by the vertical in- 

10 Probably a town near by. A town of this name is given Brugsch, 
Dictionnaire Geographique, 779, but that the two are identical is 
anything but certain. The name is probably identical, with the 
word sspt, “bower” or the like, discussed Erman, Die Mdrchen 
des Papyrus Westcar, I, 23—4. 

11 For this title Cf. the stele of Kenemsu and Seruket, Sect. 94, 
below, also Kahun Papyri, PI. 21/25, Griffith, Siut and Der 
Rif eh, Rifeh I/19; Zeitschr. f. ag. Spr., 3 y, 98. 

IS Apparently the same as Km-\vr, Athribis (Benha); see Gar¬ 
diner in Jdurn. Egn. Arch., I, 3 i, note 3 . 

15 For this obscure priestly title (ibh), which occurs a few times 
in the Middle Kingdom, see especially Loret in Sphinx, 5, 148 foil. 

14 Perhaps to be read rthti, from a not uncommon mistranscription 
of the hieratic sign. See, on the word and its reading, Devaud in 
Rec. de Trav., 39, 20 foil. 


STELE OF NEBPU 


27 


scription: “ By the action on their behalf 1 of their 
brother, the justified Nebpu.” On the extreme left 
runs the inscription referred to above: “ An offer¬ 
ing that the King gives for the ka of the butler 
Sonb.” 

Fourth and lowest Register. Representations of 
a woman and three youths, all kneeling. Their 
connection with Nebpu is not indicated; but they 
are perhaps his wife, or daughter, and sons. They 
are described respectively as: “ Tlie justified f An- 
khetran,” “ The justified Reis-sonb,” “ The justified 
Seneny,” “ The justified Khnemsu.” All are further 
styled nb im)h, “ Possessor of honour.” 

This very fine stele presents numerous points of 
interest, particularly in regard to the inscription 
at the top, which has several original features. 
The occurrence of the god Hezhotep in the “ offer- 
ing-that-the-King-gives ” formula at this time is 
perhaps unique. Even the mention of this god is 
far from common before quite late times, 2 when 
he is particularly associated with embalmment. 
Equally curious is the mention of Sesostris II in 
the same formula; he was certainly contemporary 
with Nebpu. The name Nb-pw is doubtless an ab¬ 
breviation of Nb-pw-Sn-w&rt, Nebpusenwosret, which 
is found e. g. British Museum Stelae, II, PI. 1. 

90. Broken stele of another (?) Nebpu, Tomb 140, 
PI. LXII. 10 cm. thick. Xllth dynasty. At top:— 
“ An offering that the King gives to Osiris, Lord 
of Busiris, the Great God, Lord of Abydos, that 
offerings may come forth at the voice, bread and 
beer, for the ka of Nebpu.” Below, five incomplete 
lines containing a common funerary formula :—“ [O 
ye living one] s who are upon earth, every priest, 
every prophet, all ^-servants who may pass [by 
this tomb of the Necropolis] in faring northwards 
or southwards, your king shall honour you, [your 
local gods shall love you(?)], ye [shall transmit] 
your offices to [your] children, [according as ye 
shall say; ' A thousand loaves, a thousand jugs 
of beer, a thousand oxen, a thousand fowl, all 
good and] pure [things whereon a god lives (?)... 
to the ka' of Nebpu.]” 

9:. Stele of ffaremfiab, Tomb 19, Pis. LXXII, 2 and 
XXIV, 1, Xllth dynasty. “ An offering that the 

1 A common Middle Kingdom formula referring to the dedi¬ 
cation of a stele to the deceased by relatives; it occurs also on the 
stele of Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb (see sect. 92 below). 

2 Cf. Hearst Med. Pap., 14/4 (associated with Termuthis), and 

in the name Sathezhotep, Cairo Coffins 28085—6. To be distin¬ 

guished from the god Wi-htp, who occurs e. g., Pyr. 2068. 


King gives to Osiris, the Great God, Lord of Abydos, 
that he may give a coming-forth-at-the-voice offer- 
. ing of bread, beer, oxen, geese, cakes, to the ka 
of the married woman, the justified Haremhab.” 
The inscription, the eyes on the hotep, and the 
detail of the cornice, are in ink only. 

92. Stele of Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb, Yamib, 
and Sepi, Pis. LXXII, 3 and XXIV, 3. 14 cm. thick, 
Xllth dynasty. The signs of the horizontal lines, 
recto, are slightly modelled in the interior. 

Recto. The two vertical lines at the top contain 
the same formula with one variant:—“ An offering 
that the King gives to the Lord of the Holy Ground 
' {var., the Lord of Life) for the ka of the Overseer 
of the Seal, the justified Sonb.” The two gods men¬ 
tioned are represented by the two couchant jackals. 
Below, in eight horizontal lines:—“An offering 
that the King gives to Ptafi, South of his Wall, 
Lord of f Ankhtowi, 3 an offering given to Ra f -Ha- 
rakhte, to Geb, to Socharis-Osiris, Lord of the 
Sarcophagus (?), an offering given to the Greater 
Ennead and the Lesser Ennead, to the Upper Egyp¬ 
tian and Lower Egyptian Palaces, that they may 
give coming-forth-at-the-voice offerings of bread, 
beer, cakes, thread, cloth, cold water, incense, abun¬ 
dant offerings, everything good and pure whereon 
a god lives, every day for ever, at the monthly 
feast and the half-monthly feast, at the Wa’g-feast, 
at the feast of Thoth, at every feast during eter¬ 
nity, for the ka 3 of the hereditary count, Sealer of 
the King of Lower Egypt, the Unique Companion, 
the Overseer of the seal, the justified Khentekhtay¬ 
emsaf-sonb, possessor of honour, son of the married 
woman, the justified Henut, possessor of honour. 
By the action on his behalf of his son, the room- 
keeper of the Ancestors, the justified Sepi, posses¬ 
sor of honour, son of the justified Ibi (fern). An 
offering that the King gives to Osiris, the Great 
God, Lord of Abydos, an offering given to the 
Crocodilopolite Suchos, that he may give coming- 
forth-at-the-voice offerings of bread, beer, oxen, 
geese, cakes, incense, oil, abundant offerings for 
the ka’ of the Overseer of the Interior, the doyen 
of the Overseers of the Seal, 4 the justified Yamib, 
son of Ipy (fern.), possessor of honour . . .” 

Verso. Round the edge of the face, beginning 
together at the top, two variations of the same 

3 A district of Memphis. 

4 Or perhaps “the Chief Overseer of the Interior of the Over¬ 
seer of the Seal,” taking imi-ri e -hnwti smsw (wr?) as a household 
official of the imi-ri dist. 






28 


STELES 


formula:—“ An offering that the King gives to 
Socharis-Osiris, Lord of Re-stau (var., to Ptah, 
South of his Wall, Lord of f Ankhtowi), that he 
may give coming-forth-at-the voice offerings of 
bread, beer, oxen, geese, cakes, incense and cold 
water (var., incense and oil) to the ka of the Sealer 
of the King of Lower Egypt, the Overseer of the 
Seal, Khent[ekhtayemsaf-sonb]. 

Horizontal inscription:—“ The room-keeper Sepi, 
he says: ‘ O ye living ones who are upon earth, 
every priest, every Zru’-servant, every scribe, every 
functionary 1 of a temple, every functionary 1 of the 
Crown, 2 who may read 3 this writing yrhich is upon 
this stele, who may pass by this tomb 4 5 of the Necro¬ 
polis whether faring northwards or southwards— 
your local gods shall honour you, ye shall trans¬ 
mit your offices to your sons, ye shall induct those 
whom ye have begotten to the temple. The breath 
of the mouth is profitable to a dead man; it is 
not anything [by which] one is fatigued . . .” 3 

It seems clear that the name Sonb of the two 
vertical lines of the recto is an abbrevation of 
Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb (which could certainly bear 
shortening), and refers to the same person. That 
the back of the stele was “usurped” is by no 
means certain; apart from the fact that on pa- 
laeographical grounds the writing of both sides 
must be assigned to the same period (though not, 
probably, to the same hand; note the differences 
in the determination of the masculine personal 
names), the horizontal text of the verso is framed 
in texts relating to the subject of the recto. Further, 
in spite of the quite different writings of the names, 
it is difficult not to believe that the “ room-keeper 
$pi” is identical with the “room-keeper of the 
ancestors Spi,” the son of Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb. 

1 Here and elsewhere in this context i!t “office” for “holder of 
an office;” the converse of the principle whereby tit “Vizier,” mfi 
ni si, “ regulator (?) of the phyle,” ss " scribe.” are used for “vizier- 
ship,” “office of mti ni si,” “scribe’s profession,” &c.; cf. Sethe, 

Die Einsetzung des Veiiers, 6 . 

3 Pr ni-Swt, the department of the Crown Lands, Crown Taxes, &c. 

3 Read sdti-in, S-- > for i w i. 

4 This word, and its reading, are unknown to me. 

5 Read nfw ni ri Ih n i r h, nn nw m ivrd[t hr-fj. Had I recog¬ 

nized this formula (on which see Spiegelberg, in Zeitschr.f. ag. 
Spr., 45, 67 foil.) when tracing the stone, my copy would doubtless 
have here been somewhat different. The preceding sentences appear 
to form a period by themselves, in which blessings &c. are pro¬ 

mised to those who read (aloud) the htp rdi ni-Swt formula below, 

now lost. The usual construction is of course: “O ye livmg ... 

who may read (var. pass by) this stele (var. tomb), ye shall be 
blessed &c. according as ye say ‘An offering that the King gives &c.’ ” 


We may thus see in the stone a joint memorial to 
father and son; in this case it must have been 
“free-standing,” which is not without archaeological 
interest (cf. as notable examples Cairo Stelae 20538, 
20539). The hypothesis is however possible that 
the son did, at some time after his father’s death, 
utilize the back of the latter’s stele in his own 
interest, turning the previous recto out of sight, 
and salving his conscience by devoting the surround 
of the new face to his parent’s memory. 

Since we obviously have to restore at least “ the 
justified Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb” in continuation 
of the vertical lines of the verso, it follows that 
the missing lower part of the stone must have 
amounted to at least a quarter in height of what 
remains. 

93. Stele of Itenhab, 6 Tomb 124, Pis. LXXIII, 8, 
and XVI, 2. XIIth dynasty. Much of the colouring 
of this beautiful stele is preserved; it is indicated 
in the plate by heraldic shading. 7 The hiero¬ 
glyphs, and the outlines of the fruit on the table, 
are filled in with green. 

Horizontal text: “An offering that the King 
gives to Osiris, Lord of the Holy Ground, an offer¬ 
ing given to Hathor, Lady of Aphroditopolis (Atfili), 
that offerings may come forth at the voice—bread, 
beer, oxen, geese, thread, cloth, cold water, incense, 
oil, abundant offerings, everything pleasant, every¬ 
thing good, every growing thing, everything pure, 
all oblations, for the ka of her who is in honour 
with Anubis, 8 the married woman, this justified 
Itenhab, daughter of the justified Haz (Jem.), posses¬ 
sor of honour.” 

Below this the deceased is seated before a well- 
stocked table, behind which sits “her eldest daugh¬ 
ter 9 Imues,” nursing “her beloved son Renefsonb.” 

Another, much larger stele of this woman was 
found in tomb 104. The surface was very badly 
abraded, and all that remained visible was (a) a 
few signs from a two-line inscription of similar 
purport to the above, with no variants of interest, 

6 For this name, meaning perhaps “she who has come for the 
festival” cf. Lieblein, Namenworterbuch, pp. 458, 460, 1035, io 36 ; 
a variant form iit-hb, op. cit., No. 177; a masculine form i(i)-n-lfb, 
op. cit.. Nos. 495, 1666, 1814. That hb is to be read, and not nb, 
is made certain by variants. The name in the title of PI. LXXIII 
(printed off some time ago) should be corrected to Itenhab. 

’ See PI. LXXVII, 9. 

8 The mace under the Anubis-sign is curious, and is reminiscent 
of the mace crossing the pole of the Upwaut standard as determi¬ 
native of “ Horus-worshippers ” in Pyramids, 1245 cM. 

9 For sit wrt, “eldest daughter,” cf. Sinuhe, B/79. 


STELESs, CANOPIC JARS, STATUETTES 


2 9 


( b ) the head and one arm ot the deceased, in the 
same position as on the complete stele, (c) a false 
door at the bottom. 

94. Steles of Kenemsu and Seruket, Tombs 105 
and 140, Pis. LXXIV, 3 , 4 and XVI, 1. Xllth dy¬ 
nasty ; 6 cm. and 7-5 cm. thick respectively. 

The inscription of the smaller stone reads: “ An 
offering that the King gives to Anubis, Lord of 
Life, an oflFering given tb Osiris, Lord of the Holy 
Ground, for the ka of the Councillor of the God, 1 
the justified Kenemsu, possessor of honour. An 
offering that the King gives to Osiris, Lord of Life, 
for the ka of the married woman, the justified 
Seruket ( fem .), possessor of honour.” 

That of the larger: “ An offering that the King 
gives to Osiris, Lord of Busiris, that he may give 
bread, beer, oxen and geese for the ka of the 
Councillor of the God, Kenemsu, possessor of 
honour. An oflFering that the King gives to Osiris, 
Lord of the Holy Ground, for the ka of the married 
woman, the justified Seruket, possessor of honour.” 

Kenemsu and Seruket were presumably man 
and wife. 

95. Stele of Renefsonb, Tombs 3 o, 41, i 36 , 140. 
PI. LXXV, 5. Xllth dynasty. This stele was found 
in several pieces, which were obtained from four 
tombs. 2 The attribution is somewhat doubtful, and 
is based on the* fact that the two inscriptions 
running down the side edges both refer to the 
person in question. Other names, however, occur 
on the face of the stone. 

At the top, fragments of a funerary formula 
mentioning “ coming-forth-at-the-voice offerings of 
[beer] and bread, a thousand of [thread] and cloth, 
cold water, incense..., an offering that the King 
gives to Osiris, Lord of [Busiris].. .” 

Behind the seated figure: “. . . Ptah-Socharis, 
Lord of the Sarcophagus (?) . . . the justified X, 
possessor of honour ...” Behind the table of offer¬ 
ings : “... in honour with Socharis-Osiris, . .. the 
justified 3 .. . emsa, possessor of honour.” “... [every¬ 
thing good] and pure which heaven gives, [which 
Earth] creates, [and which the Nile brings from 
its cavern, for the ka 1 of...] the justified IJotpu, 
possessor of honour.” 

1 On this title cf. p. 26 above, note 11. 

2 Itenhab’s pair of stelae, and Kenemsu and Seruket’s pair of 

stelae were each dispersed in two tombs or tomb-fillings. Inscribed 

stones found in the tombs or shafts of a crowded cemetery must 
evidently be used with great caution as evidence of the identity 
of the occupants. For reasons, see section 14. 3 M)'-(hrw). 


On the lateral edges. Right: “[An offering that 
the King gives to Osiris, Lord of Busir]is, the 
Great God, Lord of Abydos, that he may give 
coming-forth-at-the-voice offerings of bread, beer, 
oxen, geese, everything good and pure, for the 
ka of the Overseer of ships, the justified Renef¬ 
sonb, Possessor of honour.” Left: “An offering that 
the King gives to Shesmu, 4 Horus, Thoth(?) that 
he may give ” etc. (as on right). 

96. Stele of Thayt(?) and Tiuy(?), unnumbered, 
PI. LXXVI, 1. 12 cm. thick. Probably XIXth dy¬ 
nasty. Indifferent work, in bad preservation, from 
Gurob. 

First register: A man, probably Thayt (?) adoring 
“Osiris, Ruler of the West,” behind whom stand 
Isis and Nephthys. 

Second register: A priest offers water to “the 
Osiris, the justified Thayt(?),” and “the Osiris, 
the married woman, the justified Tiuy(?).” 

97. CANOPIC JARS. 

Two limestone jars, Tomb 92, PI. LXXV, 2, 3. 
(a) “Thou who art in honour with Imsetu, I shall 
be with thee, thou married woman, justified Se- 
nebtisi.” (b) “Thou who art in honour with Hapi, 
I shall be in thy presence, thou married woman, 
justified Senebtisi.” More than one interpretation 
of this formula is possible. 

Lid,of limestone jar, unnumbered, PI. LXXV, 4. 
“ He who is in honour with Dwamautef, the Over¬ 
seer of Canals (?), Sennu(?)nai.” 

98. SMALL OBJECTS. 

Black granite statuette. Tomb 606, PI. XIX, 1. 
“ The overseer of the Interior, the justified Shesmu- 
hotep”; cf. the name Shesmuey, “the god Shesmu 
is come” (Aeg. Inschr. Mus. Berl., I, 256—1203/11). 

Limestone statuette-base. Tomb 117, PI. LXXIV. 
Greatest length 11-5 cm. “An offering that the 
king gives to the ka of the justified Seneny.” 

Wooden statuette-base of Kemtet. Tomb 262, 
PI. XVIII, 4; see Sect. 32 . 

Wooden head-rest of Ihynes. Tomb 151, PI. VIII, 
6 see Sect. 32 . 

* The god of the wine-press and the oil-press; for references 
see Gardiner, art. “Personification (Egyptian)” in Hastings’ Ency¬ 
clopaedia of Religion and Ethics, p. 792 ( 1 . 2), also the name 
Shesmuhotep, Sect. 98 below. A town U-shesem, written with the 
same sign, seems to have existed in the vicinity, see Griffith, 
Kahun Papyri, PI. 2 i/ 3 o with p. 104. 


3 o 


HIERATIC INSCRIPTIONS 


HIERATIC INSCRIPTIONS. 

99. Pots bearing religious texts, Tomb 290, Pis. 

LXXVIII, LXXIX. 

These two unusual objects were found each in 
a number of pieces, but when joined up were nearly 
complete. Each is inscribed round the body, in 
seven horizontal lines of somewhat coarse writing, 
with a spell for the dead. 

A. (PI. LXXVIII):—“(1) [?Being wijth 1 Ptah: 
' One shall give [thee] . . . from thy gallons (?), thou 
shalt drink water off the altar (2) of Re f ; Osiris 
shall give thee the [assumption of a new form ?].* 
Thou shalt behold the sheen of the water, 3 when 
thou hast forsaken 4 thy house ( 3 ) of darkness; 
Nile shall flow seven cubits deep over the ground 
of thy house of thirst. (4) Thou shalt drink a 
jug of milk, the present of Sekhat-Hor; J thou shalt 
put on (5) the “ pure ’’-garment, having put off 
any other, when the hands of Tayet 6 have clothed 
thee. Thou shalt look at the sun’s disk; (6) thou 
shalt adore Re f ; thou shalt propitiate him who 
rises in Nun. Bread shall be given thee in (7) 
Memphis, pure because of(?) thy offerings.’ ” 

I know no parallel text of this spell. 

B. (PI. LXXIX ):—“ (1) A spell for offering things 
to 7 the Spirits, opening the mouth at the beginning 
of reading(?): (2) ‘Heaven shall be Qpened to 
thee; earth shall be opened to thee; the ways 
shall be opened to thee in the Necropolis. Thou 
shalt come forth and go in ( 3 ) with Re f . Be thou 
free like the Lords of Eternity; 8 receive sna'-cakes 9 
as the gift of Ptah, pure (4) bread off the altars 

1 Restore possibly [umn hnf Pth, a form of title with which 
those of Book of the Dead, Spelts 95, 96-7, io 3 , l 3 i, may be 
compared. 

2 Restore perhaps ir[t hprw~\; for this as a gift of the gods cf. 
perhaps Sethe, Urkunden, IV, 147/8, Il 3 /l 3 . Neither irtt “milk” 
nor irw “activity” can have stood here. 

3 Or, less probably, “light and water.” 

4 Rki is curious here; usually of “turning against” a person. 

3 A cow-goddess. 6 The goddess of textile production. 

’ Will n, “ to offer (lit., set down) things to ” a person, e. g., 

Sinuhe, B/90, Berl. Pap. 1425 (Lament.''Isis and Nephthys), 5/2, 12 
(with iht as here); there is perhaps present the idea of leaving, 
relinquishing, as certainly in Pyramids, 297, 3 oo. Cf. also wlhyt, 
wllft, “oblation.” 

8 Cf. Turin Stela 154/15, Turin Pap. (ed. Pleyte-Rossi), 27/1; 
Petrograd Pap. 1116A, recto/57: also, with nbw Dlt, Budge, Book 
of the Dead (1898), text, 432. 

5 Smu-cakes seem to have been specially made to be offered on 
the altars of the gods, being afterwards, at least in some cases, 
applied to the benefit of the dead; cf., e. g., the references Budge, 
Book of the Dead (1898), Vocabulary, 291, s. v. “sennu”; and very 
frequently in the steles. 


of Horus. Thy soul shall live, thy members shall 
flourish; 10 thy sight shall be clear in the ways (of 
darkness). 11 (5) Nile shall give thee water; Napri 12 
shall give thee bread; HathOr shall give thee beer; 
Heset 13 (6) shall give thee milk. Thou shalt wash 
thy feet upon slabs of silver on (7) bases (?) 14 of 15 
turquoise; thou shalt put on the “pure’’-garment.’” 16 

This spell is already known in extenso from 
Florence Stela Invent. 2567 (Schiaparelli 1617) 17 of 
the New Kingdom, which contains almost word 
for word the same text (without the title, Harageh, 
1 . 1). The following are the verbal variants: 18 

2 whvt] wit, “ a way;” 3 wktn n-k) w&tn-k, “ thou 
shalt walk free;” 3 557?] ssp-k, “ thou shalt receive;” 
3 m didi Pth ] m didi (n)-k Pth, “ as Ptah’s gift to 
thee;” 4 hhvt pi.] hiwt sg.; 4 jvJd?] ru'd, “ shall be 
intact;” 4 whvt pi.] n>B kkw, “ the road of dark¬ 
ness;” 5 H c p{] m (— in) H'pi; 5 Nprl dif n-k tf\ 
Npri dif tl ; 5 Ht-hr) m (== in) Ht-hr; 5 Hst] m Hst : 
7 inrw pi.] inr sg.; 7 spyt] nprt (see below); 7 t/r] nt ; 
7 wnh-k iFbtv] omitted: F. continues after mfkt: di-tjv 
n-k t 3 4 m Ddiv, 8 m 3 bdn>, 12 m W-pkt, dsi m Pr-Pf, 
“ may they give thee four loaves in Busiris, eight in 
Abydos, twelve in U-pekt, a jug (of beer) in Per-re c .” 

A few sentences from this spell also occur Turin 
Papyri (ed. Pleyte-Rossi), 27. 

With the curious sentence “ thou shalt wash thy 
feet upon slabs of silver on bases of turquoise ” 
several passages may be compared:— 

( a ) “ Slabs of silver shall be brought in to thee 
on bases (nprt) of turquoise,” Lacau, Textes Religieux, 
20/62, 65. 

(b) “ Thou shalt wash thy feet upon a slab of 
[silver] on the brink (?— nprt ) of the Pool of the 
God,” Naville, Totenbuch, I, 172/41-2. 19 

10 The traces seem to suit ivld best; the rwd of the Florence 
parallel text (see below) can hardly have stood here. 

11 Almost certainly to be restored here; see the Florence text, and 
cf. wb] hr-k m pr kkw, Naville, Totenb., I, 169/17. 

12 The god of grain. 13 A sacred cow. 

14 Spyt; the word, so written, is unknown to me, but is is possibly 
a writing of ipt (written with the lip-sign), on which see below. 

15 Dr seems the certain reading here, but in any case nt should 
be read, as in the other versions given below. 

16 Cf. Naville, Totenb., I, 172/30; Lacau, Textes Religieux, 
20/25, 28. 

17 A copy was kindly made for me by Signor Farina, and after¬ 
wards collated by myself with the original; the text is published 
Rec. de Trav., 2, 124-5. 

18 The numbers = lines of the Harageh text; the words before 
the square brackets are those of the Harageh text, and the Florence 
variants follow the brackets. 

19 Cf. also “thou shalt wash thy feet in basins (hlw) of silver,” 
same spell, 1 . 33 . 




POTS WITH HIERATIC INSCRIPTIONS 


3i 


( c ) “ Thou shalt walk upon ground of silver, upon 
a floor of gold; thou shalt be washed upon a slab 
of silver upon a floor of gold; thou shalt be em¬ 
balmed upon a base ( nprt ) of turquoise,” Louvre 
Pap. 5158 (“Ritual of Embalmment”), 10/18-9, 
see Maspero, Sur Quelques Papyrus du Louvre, 50 
(cited by Blackman in Journal, V, 122). 

(ct) “ He shall wash his feet upon a slab of silver 
on a basis (nprt 1 ) of turquoise,” Rec. de Trav., 36 , 
82 (late stele from Haw&ra). \ 

All these passages use instead of the spyt of 
our text a word nprt, which occurs also Budge, 
Book of the Dead (1898), Text, 36 , “thou earnest 
forth from him upon the brink (?— nprt) of the Lake 
of Horus.” It seems to mean (a) a flat under-sur¬ 
face, the “ basis ” of slabs, or an embalming-slab, 
(b) the “ brink ” of a piece of water, 2 and is thus 
perhaps completely synonymous with spt (written 
with the lip-sign), which means (a) “ brink ” of 
a pool, (b)*“ basis” of a block (see, e. g., Great 
Harris Pap., 7/1), and of which, in the latter sense, 
the spyt of the Harageh text is perhaps a writing, 
if it be not a mere corruption of npryt, which is 
not impossible. The writer, in speaking of “slabs 
of silver on a basis of turquoise” had perhaps in 
mind an ablution-block (»Sbt) of the type of that found 
by Legrain and described by him in Annales du 
Service, 4, 225 foil.; this is a rectangular block of 
alabaster, having a depression at the top to hold 
water, with two parallel oblongs left in relief in 
the centre of the depressed surface to receive the 
feet; see Blackman, Journal, V, 121. It is possible 
that royal ablution-blocks of this type had the 
depressed surface faced with turquoise, the foot- 
slabs plated with silver. 

It seems probable, from the cumulative evidence 
of a number of slight indications, that these texts 
are of Memphite origin. Spell A is concerned, as 
the title shows, with Ptah, and at the end bread 
is promised in Memphis; further, the sentence 
‘■thou shalt put on the ‘ pure ’-garment ” also occurs 
in Book of the Dead, Spell 172/30, a spell considered 
by Naville (Totenbuch, Einleitung, 29, 188), to be 
of Memphite origin. In spell B “cakes as the gift 
of Ptafi” are mentioned, and the sentences “thou 
shalt wash thy feet upon slabs of silver” and (as 
in A) “thou shalt put on the ‘ pure’-garment ” 
occur in the perhaps Memphite B. D. spell just 

1 The publication has ndrtt; read nprtt. 

1 See Blackman, loc. cit. 


mentioned. Finally, the Florence stela containing 
spell B was made for “the Royal Scribe, the High 
Steward in Memphis, Amenhotpe.” 

The two hieratic inscriptions can be dated fairly 
closely on palaeOgraphical grounds. The writing 3 
is quite characteristic of the “ Hyksos period,” i. e., 
it approaches most nearly to the hands of the West- 
car Papyrus, the Golenischeff Ritual, the Rhind 
Mathematical Papyrus, and Carnarvon Tablet I. 
The following is a comparison of some of the 
signs from the pots with (a) the characteristic 
forms of the same signs from the first three of these 
MSS. given by Moller, Hieratische Palaographie, I, 
and (b) the same signs in Carnarvon Tablet I, ob¬ 
verse 4 :— 



Harageh 

Westcar 

Golen. Math. 

Carn. Tabl 

r 

A /3 

16 

... 

... 

i) 

A/1, 3 , 4 

... 

356 

2*, 7* 

I 

B /4 

... 

49 b* 

... 


B IS 

... 

... 

II 

A 

A/2 

I IQ* 

... 

... 

«=ID 

B/4 

... 

... 

2 

.fSan' 

AAAAAA 

A/ 4 , 
B/i, 2, 7 

B /4 

132 * 

209 

... 

l6 


B /7 

... 263, last ex. ... 

... 

i^T> 

O 

>> 

A /3 

A/2 

(twice) 

B /3 

3 o 3 , last 

2 exx. 

3 oi 

I 


B/2 

326 

... 

... 

33 

A/6 

334, 
note 3 

... 

... 

© 

A /7 

... 

33 g 

... 


3 A' bold uncial, with a few very cursive forms, e. g., (Kj), 

k O 

, That tbe writer was no very practised scribe seems 

likely from tbe varying forms of Y-H’T 


4 The numbers under “Westcar,” “Golen” and “Math.” are 
those of Moller, op. cit., I; those under “Carn. Tabl.” refer to 
the lines of this document, obverse, best published Journal, III, 
Pis. 12, 1 3 . An asterisk indicates that the similarity, though close, 
is less great than with the others. 






32 


PAPYRI 


Harageh 

A/4, 5 , 

B/7 1 

B /4 

B /3 
A/2, 

B /4 

B/7 Anh., IX ... Anh., IX ii, 12 
B/7 Anh.) LXII ... 

Two or three forms approach most nearly to 
those of the Ebers Pap., e. g., the of 
A/i, 4 (Moller, op. cit., 198), B/i (op. cif., 26), 
but the evidence as a whole points clearly to the 
Hyksos Period as that of these inscriptions. Both 
the latter are obviously from the same hand. 

100. Pot inscriptions and ostraca, PI. LXXX. 
At the spot marked “Wadi I” on the plan, PI. II, 
between cemeteries A and F, were found many 
sherds, mostly from quite large jars distinct in 
colour (a light buff), and in form, from the funerary 
pottery, and therefore called by us, for want of a 
better name, “ town ” ware. A small proportion of 
these fragments bore ink inscriptions; some of the 
latter had evidently been borne by the pots when 
complete (“pot inscriptions”), while others had 
been written on the broken sherds (ostraca). The 
former class perhaps came from jars used in trade 
and inscribed by the vendors of the goods they 
contained. All the inscriptions appear to be of 
the Middle Kingdom. 

“ Pot inscriptions.” 

1. Nfr, “good,” 2 (:. e., good quality) from several 
jars; gs (?) 2 (?) nfr, “half-and-half (?), good,” nfr nfr, 
“very good.” 3 

6. “ Eight, the house,” i. e., perhaps, “ eight 
(gallons for) the house;” “house” might mean 
for domestic or private use. For “eight hlptt 
(gallons)” cf. Nos. 7, 9, 10,' 11 below. The ob¬ 
vious rendering “ eight houses ” gives no apparent 
meaning. 

7, 9, 10, 11. “Eight gallons of natron.” This 
amount, though large, could quite easily have been 

- O C o ) 

1 An abnormal writing. The writing of , A/6, B/ 3 , 5 

(Moller, 555 &), also appears to be abnormal. 0 * 1 1 

3 Cf Spiegelberg, Hieratic Ostraka and Papyri (Egn. Res. 
Account), Nos. 3 12, 319. 

3 Applied to “wine” in N. K. wine-jars Spiegelberg, op. cit., 
Nos. 155, 177, 197, &c.; Petrie, Tell el Amama, p. 32 — 3 , PI. XXI. 



Westcar Golen. Math. Carn. Tabl. 

430 * 


487* 


55P 


509 


contained by jars of the size from which the frag¬ 
ments must have come; it is equivalent to a cubic 
space between i 3 and 14 inches each way. Eight 
gallons, it may be noted, are the equivalent of the 
Persian dQTcxfrj (pTOB : 6PTOB, modern Arabic 
ardebb ), which in Ptolemaic times and later became 
one of the commonest of the larger measures of 
capacity. 4 

Ostraca. 

2. “Fourth regnal year, fourth month of’Akhet, 
25th day of the month. What the town of Renu- 
fer 5 has brought: two oxen (?) of.. . 6 Senbefnai; 
100,000 (?) 7 ...; 190 birds. What Paenti[nai] 8 has 

brought:_ ” Perhaps a receipt made out to two 

parties, the first a town, the second an individual. 
Several points, however, are conjectural. 

3 . “Fourth regnal year, third month of Shomu, 
eighth (?) day of the month; ” the rest is illegible to me. 

8. “First (month) of Proyet, i 3 th(?) day of the 
month. What ... nef has brought per (?) 9 ... 200 (?) 
...” A receipt? 

Receipts, common enough in the late periods, 
seem quite rare for the earlier ones. 

With Nos. 4 and 5 I can do nothing. 

101. PAPYRI. 

In the surface rubbish, and in the filling of some 
of the tombs, were found a small number of Middle 
Kingdom hieratic papyri, all more or less damaged; 
they are, generally speaking, closely similar to 
those found by Prof. Petrie at Kahftn, a few miles 
away, and published by Mr Griffith in 1898. It 
has not been found expedient to publish photo¬ 
graphic reproductions of them in the present vo¬ 
lume, and since, in view of their palaeographical 
value and the difficult nature of some of the 
writing, hand-copies and transcriptions would be 
inadequate, they have been entrusted to me for 
separate and complete publication later. The follow¬ 
ing is a catalogue of them. 

1. Part of a literary papyrus, in vertical lines, 
containing, in a fairly good book-hand, a parallel 
text of Sinuhe, B/io 3 —no. This has already been 

4 Cf. Griffith in Proc. Soc. Bibl. Arch., 1892, 434. 

5 “The fair door.” 

6 Either a title or the first element of the name. 

7 This, if correct, is a strangely high number; the sign seems 
to have been merged in the one below it. 

8 Conjectural restoration of the end of this common M. K. name. 

9 M drt. 





COPTIC AND GREEK STELES 


33 


made known in transcription (not quite accurately) 
by Gardiner, Notes on the Story' of Sinuhe, 177-8. 

2. Recto, account of amounts of various grains, &c., 
credited (?) to several persons; verso, address to 
one Ameny, 1 and endorsement with date by the 
recipient (?). 

3 . Page of an official journal, containing entries 
relating to the administration of lands under three 
dates. Much wormeaten. 

4. Fragment of accounts, somewhat similar in 
character to those of Kahun Papyri, PI. 17. 

5. Part of a letter in horizontal lines, dealing 
with draggers of stones ( ith-inrw ); somewhat worm- 
eaten. 

6. Part of a letter in horizontal lines; contents 
obscure. 

7. Recto, part of a letter in horizontal lines, 
consisting chiefly of the usual formal phrases, but 
mentioning a local Ifnbt. Verso, part of the address. 
Recto and verso, red writing, much faded; ap¬ 
parently the draft of the recipient’s answer (cf. 
Moller, Hieratische Palaographie, I, PI. 5, No. 2 ; 
Kahun Papyri, PI. 32/1 3 foil.). 

8. Two very small fragments of a letter in 
vertical lines. 

CHAPTER X 

THE COPTIC AND GREEK STELES. 

By R. ENGELBACH. 

102. PI. LXXVI, No. 2. Coptic stele, 5 cm. thick, 
of Apa Phibamhn in the Fayhmic dialect. This 
dialect is not consistent, and is characterized by 
r frequently becoming /, ai becoming ei and a re¬ 
placing the Sahidic e and o; see Mallon, Grammaire 
Copte, 1907, p. 122. The stele would read in Sahidic 
MApe I 16 KNA TA 26 TC^yXH MITAriA <|>lBAMOyN 
(AS MTON MMOq) COy CQMOyN MHAOJONC “May 
Thy mercy take the soul of Papa (or the Apa) 
Phibamhn; (he rested) day eight of Pashons.” 

The third letter is a mistake for r or l probably 
the latter as the optative in / is known in this 
dialect cf. Zoega, Copt. Cat.; p. 157, C 6 , v. 1 . line 4. 

1 Cf., for the addressing of an account, Kahun Papyri, PI. 23 / 23 . 


It will be seen in the plate that the scribe has put 
a n in before ■'p of -v pyXH “soul,” having perhaps 
cut the p before he realised that it was spelt with 
a double letter. The spelling of the date as cy 
cgyMyN is rather startling and seems to be an 
error rather than a dialectical form. This grave 
formula does not appear to have been previously 
noted. 

10 3 . For the following remarks on the steles 
PI. LXXVI, Nos. 3 and 4. I am indebted to Sir 
Herbert Thompson, to whom I submitted the copies, 
and who has been good enough to examine and 
report on them. 

No. 3 . The Greek inscription reads: Kvqie 6 2 dee 
rwv dvvdpeutv dvartavffov rrjv xpvyfv roij dovXov oov 3 
<&oi($dppovos diaxovov Icctqov died cpvefil exoLfiTjdrj etttcpi 
d e IvdixTidvog, “O Lord God of Powers, give rest 
to the soul of thy servant Phoebammon the deacon 
(and) physician from Phnebi; 4 he died, 9th Epip 
in the 5th indiction.” Limestone, 14 cm. thick. 

104. No. 4. Krall’s Koptische Rechtsurkunden (from 
No. IX onwards) gives the Fayhmic formula of 
dating in the 6th to 8th centuries—in which limits 
this stele falls, to judge by the forms of the letters, 
I should read accordingly for CBM; “C6n ” ;... It 
is almost certainly so. The other point is that what 
appears to be IHC was, I believe INA| as I know 
of no instance of such an invocation before N 61 
N6B (or NA NAM) and further if it is “Jesus,” it is 
very strange that it should have no superlineation. 

The stele is therefore to be read: — CAtll']' 
AB6MTAN MAB COy H ©Ay A M(?)KApHOC NTCBri 
BIB IN A | NBl N6B 2AMHN. “Sapiti went to his rest 
at the harvest of year 12 of the in diction. Have 
mercy on his soul. Amen.” Coarse limestone, 6 cm. 
thick. 

_ I take 6 before IB to correspond to the Sahidic 
N . . . For cen see further Spiegelberg, Zeitschr.f. 
ag. Spr., 50, 126 and 51, i 38 . 

2 <5 is retained ungrammatically from the familiar xtigios 6 Seos 
not the vocative « 5 . 

3 aov (sic) should be oov. 

4 Phnebi is only known (as far as I am aware) as the name of 
a small village in the Faydm (Krall, Rechtsurkunden, p. 16). 


S 





DISPERSAL LIST 

SHEWING THE COLLECTIONS IN WHICH THE OBJECTS ARE EXHIBITED, AND REFERENCE TO PAGES HERE 

ABBREVIATIONS 


Ab. 

= 

Aberdeen. 

Le. 

= 

Leicester. 

Be. 

= 

Belfast. 

Ma. 

= 

Manchester. 

BM. 

= 

British Museum. 

N.C. 

= 

Ny Carlsberg, Denmark. 

Bn. 

= 

Brooklyn, U. S. A. 

Ne. 

= 

Newbury. 

Br. 

= 

Bristol. 

No. 


Nottingham. 

Bx. 

= 

Brussels. 

Ox. 

. 

Oxford, Ashmolean. 

Ca. 

= 

Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum. 

Ph. 

= 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 

Cl. 


Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 

Re. 

= 

Reading. 

Du. 

= 

Dundee. 

Ro. 

= 

Rochdale. 

Ed. 

— 

Edinburgh. 

S.L. 

== 

St. Louis, 

GA. 

= 

Glasgow, Art Museum. 

Su. 

= 

Sunderland. 

GB. 

= 

Glasgow, Buchanan Collection. 

To. 

== 

Tonbridge, School Museum. 

Ip. 

= 

Ipswich. 

UC. 

== 

University College Collection. 

GRAVE 

NO. 

COLLECTION PAGES 

GRAVE 

NO- 

COLLECTION PAGES 


7 

15 

19 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

43 

44 
48 
52 

55 

56 
56 
61 

72 

73 
83 
86 
87 

89 

90 


Ne. 12 
No. 

Bn. 27 
UC. 

No. 

Re. 

GB. icj 
UC. 26, 29 
No. 

GB. 


(Hippopotamus).UC. 

.To. 

. ..UC. 

(Hippopotamus).Ma. 

(Dog).Bn. 


Re. 

Ed. 14 

GA. 12 
Cl. 

9 

24 ; 25 

GB. XXIII 
Du. 


91 

92 
92 
96 

99 

104 

105 

107 
no 
112 
112 

116 

117 

123 

124 
124 

124 

125 
125 
125 

127 

128 
134 


..No. 19 

pin.. Le. 15,29 

foil..Cl. Bn. 15 


U.C. 12 
Ca. 14 
Cl. 

Br. 29 
GB. 

Cl. 


group .UC. 11 

one figure.Bx. 

scarabs .No. 

...Ph. 

.Su. 

jewellery ..Ox. 15 

stele .N. C. 28 

spiral beads .Bx. 

bowl and stand.. Bx. 

one pan . . ..Dn. 

brazier &c. . . . ..UC. 

...!.uc. 

... 16 

...Ca. 

















































DISPERSAL LIST 


35 


GRAVE NO. COLLECTION PAGES GRAVE No. 

135..Ro. 11 280. 

i 3 g.. GB. 287.. 

140 .Ro. 12,27,29 290. 

141 statuette.Ph. i 3 291. 

141 beads .Ma. 295. 

*45 . 25 297. 

148.Ro. 3 o 6 . 

15 1 .Le. 8,25,29, VIII 3 o 8 (scarab and cyl. amulet) 

154 ;. - ' 1 3 3 o 8 (shell and cyl. amulet) . 

162.Ca. 1 3 309. 

173 beads, headrest .Du. 8,25 3 n . . .. 

173 box Im'abim.GB. 8 3i2. 

174 .. .. 8 3 i 6 . 

175 . 8 320. 

1 83 gold and amulets ..... Ox. 321. 

i 83 beads . . ..No. 322.. 

188 (scraper) .Re. 323 . 

188 (beads &c.).No. 326. 

190 .GB. 326. 

198.UC, Su. 327. 

201..Bx. 336 . 

206 Su. 345 ... 

207 .Su. 347. 

208 ....... - ... 9 3 5 3 (cow). 

209 .GA. 353 (frog) ... 

211 .. UC. 11 354.. 

212 .. 9 357. 

215 . . Su. 36 o.. • . 

216 ...Su. 363 . 

221. 9 369. 

23 i. 9 374.. . . . 

233 . 9 3 79 . 

236 .Ma. 383 . 

241.Re. 18 385.. 

244. 19 387 .. 

246 .... .. 25 390. 

250.Ph. 23,26 394. 

253.No. 396. 

256.Su. 399. 

260. . Cl. 401. 

262. 12,29 403. 

264 . 16 407. 

265 . Ab. 413 . 

270.Ma. 414.. 

270 foreign pots.Ox. 415 (spoon bowl). 

271 .Du. 415. 

273. No. 419. 

275 vase .GA. i 3 452. 

275 scarabs &c.UC. i 3 , 19 457 (ripple flaked flint) . . . 

276 .Br. 457 (vase) . 


COLLECTION PAGES 
. . . Ma. 12,26 
... No. 

. . , UC. 3 o 
. . . Ro. 20 
... To. 

... Ox. 


UC. 

Cl. 

Re. 

Le. 

GB. 

Ne. 

Cl. 

Ab. 

Re 1 3 


UC. 11 
Ox. 11 
Ox. 

Ma. 

Be. 


UC. 

GA. 

Ox. 1 3 
Ip. 

UC. 

Ma. 

Bx. 

No. 

Be. 

GB. 

Cl. 

UC. 

Bn. 

No. 

No. 

GB. 

GB. 1 3 
Re. 7 
Du. 

Cl. 

Re. 

Du. 

Re. 7 
Be. 


Re. 7 
GB. 7 







































































































o 


36 DISPERSAL LIST 

V 


GRAVE NO. COLLECTION PAGES 

459 .GA. 

460 .. . .. 14 

462.Ph. 

466 . .Ma. 

468 (forked lance) .Ro. 7 

468 (flint knife)...Re. 7 

470 ..Ox. 14 

475 . 7 

476 ..Ma. 7 

477 .Ma. 7 

478 .Ma. 7 

518. 18 

521 (beads) ..Du. 

521 (pin).:.Le. 

526 (flints).UC. 

526 (beads).Re. 

527 ...Ip. 

529 ...Du. 

530 .Qx. 16, 18 

532 ..Ab. i 3 

533 ... ..Ro. . 

534 .,.Ro. 

537 (forked lance) .. . Bx. 

537 (flint knife).Ma. 

5 3 9 ...Ca. 

549 (scar. cyl. & beads) . ..Ip. 

554 .GB. 

57 i. 8 

581..Ma. 

583...Re. 

585.Ab. 

59 i .. 9 ,18 

59 3 • ...UC. 9,18 

599 ... Ip. 

601..GB. 

606.. . . .. i 3 , 29 


GRAVE NO. COLLECTION PAGES 

610.Su. 

614 (eyes and pendants) Cl. 

620 (cyl., Amen. Ill beads &c.) .... Bx. 

622 . . ..Su. 

623 .Re. 

625.. . Ne. 

628...Ne. 

632 .Ne. 

642.Ma. 

644 .Su. 

645 .Ro. 

647... 18 

651.... • 14 

654.Su. 

660.Ro. 

663 ..GA. 

664 .Bx. 

666 .Ma. 

667 (glazes) .. Ph. 

667 (scarab, beads and alabaster) . . . Ro. 

668 ...... Ab. 

671-672. 14, 20 

673 ...Ab. 

674 . . . .•.Br. 

Stele ofThayt &Tiui (Gurob).GA. 29 

Block of Senusert II (sherds).GB. xo 

XVIIIth dynasty drain-pipes . . . Bn., Ma. 17 

Seals from sherds.UC., Ca., Bx. 10 

Kamares Ware.Bx., BM., Ox, 10 

Stele of Khentekhtayemsaf- 

sonb PI, LXXII, 3 .NC. 27 

Stele of Phibamhn, Coptic ....... Br. 33 

Stele of Phoebammdn, Greek.BM. 33 

Alabaster headrest, N. N., PI. VIII, 

No. 10.SL. 9 











































































INDEX 

(See Names and Titles 3 g, 40) 


\ 


Abusir, Gebel, 1 
Alabaster head-rest, 9 
vases, 9 
Amenemhet II, 19 

III, 10, 19 
Amenhotep I, 17 
Amu, 25 

Amulet case cylinder, 12, i 3 , 16 
Amulets classified, 5, 6 
described, 7—9 
Ankhetran, 27 
Ape amulet, 9 
Ardeb measure, 32 

Basalt statuettes, i 3 
vase, 14 

Beads amethyst, i 3 

classification, 5, 6 
garnet, i 3 

Boy and calf group, 11 
"Bringing the foot” ceremony, 21 
Brunton, Mr. Guy, 1 

drawing by Mrs., 1 
Burials, intrusive, 3 
Button-seal graves, 2, 8, 9 

Calf, green glazed, 12 
Canopic jars, 15, 29 
boxes, 26 

Cemeteries of Harageh, 2 
positions of, 4 
predynastic, 6, i 3 
I dyn., 14 

VI—X dyn., 7, 8, 9 
XI—XIII, 9, 14—16 
XVIII, 17, 18 
Coffin of Im'abim, 8 

Ihynes, 8, 25 
Senusert-onkh, 23 


Coffin of Iti, 24 

Neferunt, 24 
Satimpi, 24 
Mereri, 25 
Thau, 25 
Hesy, 25 
Harhotep, 25 
Collar, bead, 10 
Coptic steles, 33 
Cowry amulet, 9, 15, 16 
Cretan pottery,' 10 
Crocodiles, gold, i 3 
Cylinder amulet case, 12, i 3 , 16 

Dagger of wood, 12 
Dandyl, cemetery, 2, 7 
dbht.htp,, 21 

Dealers, trouble with, 1 
Dog, green glazed, 12 
Drain of large pipes, 17 
Dynasty VI ? graves, 2, 5 
XII graves, 2, 5 
XII town, 3 , 4 
XVIII graves, 2, 5 

Enigmatic writing, 25 
Eye amulet, 6 

Fish of gold, 12, 15 
Fishers net, floats and sinkers, 17 
Flail beads, 11 
Flint knives, 7, 11 
Foreign pottery, 10, 11, 18 
Frog, blue glazed, 12 
wood, 1 3 

Frost, Mr. F. P., 1 

Game-board model, 12 
Gebel Abusir, 1 
et Toha, 1 


38 


INDEX 


Gerzeh, 4 

Gods and goddesses, obscure: 
Hebnut, 21 
Hez-hotep, 27 
Khentekhtay, 26 
Napri, 3 o 
Sebek of Edfu, 19 

of Fayum, 19, 27 
Sekhat Hor, 20 
Shesmu, 29 
Tayet, 3 o 

Gold amulets, 9, i 3 , 16 
Granite statuettes, i 3 
Granular gold work, 16 
Groups liable to mixture, 29 
Gunn, Mr. Battiscombe, 1, 20 
Gurob, 4 

Hand amulet, 9 
Harageh, site, 1 
Haremhab stele, 27 
Har-hotep cofFin, 25 
Harpocrates, quartz, 9 
Hawk amulet, 9 
Haz, 28 

Head-rest on hands, 9 

of alabaster, 9 
Head-rests, 8 
Heart amulet, 6 
Heh, 20 
Henut, 27 

Heri-shaf-nakht grave, 14, 19 
Hesy, coffin, 25 
Hez-hotep a god, 27 
Hippopotamus, blue pasta, 12 
Horus, four children of, 26 
Hotpu, 29 

Human figures, glazed, 11 
Iha, 24 

Ihynes, 8, 25, 29 
Ikh, 19 
Im'abim, 8 
Imi, 26 
Imues, 28 

Inscriptions, 20 —23 
Int-rd., 21 

ipy, 27 

Itenhab tomb 15, 29 
Iti, 24 


Jewellery, silver, 15 

Kamares pottery, 10 
Kemtet statuette, i 3 , 29 
Kemwey (place), 26 
Kenemsu stele, 12 
Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb stele, 27 
Khnemsu, 27 

King with offering, statuette, i 3 
Kohl pots, 17 

Lahun, 4 

Leg amulet, 6, 8, 9 
Lion, amulet of double, 9 

Mace head, limestone, 14 
Marbles for a game, 14 
Marks on pottery, n 
Mentuhotep, 10, 11, 17 
Mereri, 25 
Mirror handle, 17 
Mirrors, copper, 9, i 3 , 16, 21 
silver, 21 

Murray, drawings by Miss M. A 

Names, see end 
Nebpu stele, ix, 26, 27 
Neferunt, 24 
Net for fishing, 17 
Nimeh (?) or Ur, 19 

Ostraka, 32 

Palette for ink, 17 
of slate, 14 
Pa-ramessu, prince, 4 
Papyri fragments, 32 
Papyrus-case amulet, 12 
Pectoral, 15 
Pepi, 26 

Petrie, drawings by Mrs., 1 
Prof. Flinders, x 
Phibamun stele, 33 
Phnebi (place), 33 
Phoebammon stele, 33 
Plundering of Tombs, 3 , 29 
Potmarks, 11 

Pottery black incised, 2, 10, i 3 , 
corpus numbers, 4 
foreign, 10, 11, 18 
plates of, 5 







INDEX 


3 9 


Pottery Tell el-Yehudiyeh style, 2, 10, x 3 , 17 
Old Kingdom, 5 
VII—X dynasties, 8 
Middle Kingdom, 5 
New Kingdom, 5 
Predynastic cemetery, 6 
Ptah Sokar, earliest figure, 12 

Ramessu I, group of, 2 
Razor, copper, 16 
Reis-sonb, 27 
Renef-sonb, 29 
Riqqeh, cemetery, 1 

Sanehat papyrus, 32 
Sapiti stele, 33 
Satimpi (?), 24 

Scarabs, VI—X dynasty, 2, 18 

XI 17, 18 

XII 19 

XIII 19, 20 

XVIII 20 

Seal of primitive style, 9, 14 
Sekhem-tahuti, 19 
Senebni, 26 
Senebtisi, 15, 29 
Seneny, 27, 29 
Sennu-nai, 29 
Senusert II, xo, 15, 19, 26 
III, 10, 19 

Senusert-onkh, 23 , 26 
Sepi, 28 

Sequence dates of cemetery, 7 
revision, 6 
Serpentine head, 17 
Seruket stele, 12 
Shal fish, 15 

Shells mounted in silver, 16 
of gold, 9, 1 3 
with gold tips, 15 
Shesmu-hotep, x 3 , 2g 
Ship vase, 7 
Sinuhe 32 

Smenu, overseer of stores, 19 


Sntr- ht, 21 
Sonb, 26 
Spells, 20— 3 o 

on pots, 3 o 
Spoon, alabaster, 16 
slate, 16 

Standard on ship, 7 
Statuettes, 12, i 3 
Stele of Haremhab, 27 
Itenhab, 28 

Kenemsu and Seruket, 12, ag 
Khentekhtayemsaf-sonb, 27 
Nebpu, 12, 26, 27 
Renef-sonb, 29 
Steles placed on surface, 3 
Stone vases, 5, 7, 9, 16, 17 

Tell el-Yahudiyeh ware, 2, 10, i 3 , 17 
Thau coffin, 25 
Thayt stele, 29 
Thompson, Sir Herbert, 33 
Thutmose I, 17 

III, 17 

IV, 17 

Titles, see end 
Tiuy stele, 29 
Tomb furniture, 21,-22 
Town rubbish, 3 , 11 
Turtle, gold, i 3 

Ukht-hotep, 14, 20, 23 
Usekht bead collar, 10 
Uzat-eyes amulet, 6, 9, i 3 

Vases, stone, 5, 7, 9, 16, 17 

Wady graves, 2 
War, delay by, 1 
Wheel of gold, g 
Willey, Mr. Duncan, 1 

Yamib stele, 27 
Yamyt, canopic box, 26 


PRIVATE NAMES. 

Harhotep, 25 
Haz, 28 
Heh, 20 


'Amu, 25 
'Ankhetran, 27 
Haremhab, 27 




40 

INDEX 


Henut, 27 

Phibamun, 33 


Heri-sliaf-nakht, 14, ig 

Phoebammon, 33 


Hesy, 25 

Reis-sonb, 27 

• 

Hotpu, 29 

Renef-sonb, 29 


Ibi, 27 

Sanehat, 32 


Iha, 24 

Sapiti, 33 


Ihynes, 8, 25, 29 

Satimpi (?), 24 


Ikh, 19 

Sekhemitehuti, 19 


Im‘abim, 8 

Senebni, 26 


Imi, 26 

Senebtisi, 15, 29 


Imues, 28 

Seneni, 27, 28 


Ipy, 27 

Sennu-nai, 29 


Itenhab, 15 , 28 

Senusert-onkh, 23 , 26 


Ity, 24 

Sepi, 28 


Kemtet, i 3 , 29 

Seruket, 12 


Kenemsu, 12 

Shemsu-hotep, i 3 , 29 


Khenemsu, 27 

Sinuhe, 32 


Khentekhtayem-saf-sonb, 27 

Sonb, 26 


Mereri, 25 

Thau, 25 


Nebpu, 11, 26, 27 

Thayt, 29 


Neferunt, 24 

Tiuy, 29 


Nimeh (?) Ur, 19 

Ukht-hotep, 14, 20, 23 


Paenti (nai), 32 

Ur (Nimeh), 19 


Pa-ramessu, 4 

Yamib, 27 


Pepi, 26 

Yamyt, 26 



Baker (?), 26 

TITLES. 

Overseer of Ships, 29 

Butler, 26, 27 

Store houses, 19 

Companion, 25 

Temple, 26 * 

Councillor of the God, 26, 29 

Physician (Greek), 33 

Deacon (Greek), 33 

Proclaimer of the Treasury, 19 

Doyen of overseers of the seal, 27 

Room-keeper of the Ancestors, 28 

Headman, 20, 24, 25 

Treasury, 26, 28 

Hereditary Count, 27 

Scribe of the Khent, 19, 20 

Lector priest, 21, 22, 25 

Sealer of the King of L. E., 27, 28 

Overseer of a thousand, 24, 25 

Sem priest, 21, 22 

Canals (?), 29 

Servant of the Red crown, 24 

the Interior, 27, 29 

Unique Companion, 24, 25, 27 

Priests, 25 

Adorner (?) of the King, 25 

Prophets, 24 

Vizier, 19 

the Seal, 27, 28 

Wardrobe keeper, 26 

Sealers, 26 




L 




HARAGEH. WOODEN] STATUETTES, TOMB 262. Xtl DYNASTY 


• • 





80.000 


HARAGEH. MAP OF DISTRICT. 











HARAGEH. CEMETERIES A AND F. 












1:1000 


HARAGEH 


CEMETERY B. 


IV. 



I 




1000 


HARAGEH, CEMETERIES C, E, G. 


371 
3SS t 


CEMETERY 



4ii I, 

\iji408 


.403 . 












HARAGEH. BURIALS. 1-5, PRE-DYNASTIC 


6, 7, OLD KINGDOM 

















ATcL.lrtvafc.'f 


























CO 











HARAGEH. POTTERS AND OWNERS MARKS, XII DYN. GROUP 530. X 



POTTERS’ MARKS FROM SHERD MOUNDS, TIME OF SENUSERT II. 




t 





HARAGEH. POTMARKS AND OWNERS MARKS. 
OWNERS MARKS FROM SHERD MOUNDS OF TIME OF SENUSERT II. 



MARKS ON POTS FROM TOMBS. 





S>\\N 




HARAGEH. PLANS OF SPECIAL GRAVES. 


Vlidlk. 36 


\ x ^ NX v 

\ x X. ..w 


x \ x x ' ^ \V'c> 

fl 

3 ® ( 

X \\ „ 






w I# 


f ® 

f© ® 


©® © 

© © 




401 ^^® 


X\ x x 
x > \ 

'. 

V x x X N, \h \ 'x. x 


® ® 

/?77/Tr< 


**©, 

>M 


460// / 


; n s 



ittjj i-ii. 


X V 

-X . 


-■— 

xJ 


>n n \- 


1 :iooX> \ x\\\ x ' 
X \\\A\ \\ x 


\\\VX^xX ^ I ^ 

• I© . . i—j— ^ 

\\\ />X Sfcfcon., looking S. | '/'S' 

s. / />✓/'/ y ✓ 1 ✓ . . 


mo. ^ '<sPy. 

\. ^ . 


V 4 . XX \ ^ V 



Cr R. 

ft v e s 


A 01 

■*H»o 

A 

R 69a. 

R6rU.' 

B 

K65<, 

R 68a. 

c 

K 6^lr 

R 6-lk. 

0 

R Goo. 

K feSg 

E 

R fe*| (r 


F 

RML 

R <*!«. 

Cr 

R 6»o- 

R fc«|lr- 

H 

R 44n. 

(?7S 3 

J 

R 69m 

« 

Rt»«. 


L 



H 

« 9i f 


N 

? 


O 

<-7-d 


x| 

Majrpzs 



vj.dlK 32 , 


1 ^$^' 

W* 

\ 

©XW 

\\^ N 
\W A 

\L 


N V v \ x\N< :>\X\xV\' 

1 -—-.X V X \ X : > cs • 


1 :100 n 

_I- 

■ Sh “fr * n 


J— 

0 K 

H 

(R) n 

p _ F 




=» 

4»:« L 

"" 0 

—s„ J 


Letter[ 


Lower S. Cbamlscr 



6 

s '^'si S 


■ 


s L- Shelves tfn. tcu K. Si^e 

v N \ \ \ \v \ 

N >\X ^ v\ v 
V V X V <v N Nn>V 

v X 

1 : too x 



Pqt~ 

90 * 

5W,Y,S9hr 

4«.j68f 

S8K 

7 "-i 

7 k *•") 

7 i» - 

7 i» . 

*h 


S's'S S 












X 







XV 










HARAGEH. STELE I, TOMB HO; OTHERS, TOMB 124. XII OYN. (PLS. XV, XLVI, XLVII.) 


> 


















































































































































































1:1 


HARAGEH GROUPS OF BEADS. 


XXII 











HARAGEH. STELES. XII DYNASTY 


XXIV 



r - • • v .: ‘ 





































XXV 




















































































TKt j>U XXXl~XXXM Ct closely U-V«u ttotiT f* >«tSa^T^(uUr^Vh)C<»^v-»i (x. tAtviuWtjiL 

<t-re. l)S,-f«LUw>0y\j|,7\*. *-*,yJX*J L*vi Vl"\Ml, IS A,&»C. X AjB 


H «■■<•«. 

P^toUuJt'CavjpiM^ 

M«v«- 



1 

8 h 

Vl-VU 

18 

3 6 vvl 

KB 

3 

8 r 


19 

35* f? 

IXA-C 

4 

17 c 


2.0 

3S“m 

X A 

6 

r 6 «. 

IX-X 

21 

34 

Vl-XA 

9 

8 far 

V- IXC 

2.S 

6 dU 


It 

33 k 


f 30 

51 k 

VMS C 

12 - 

36 V 

IXC'X& 

3 1 

SI k 

IXC 

16 

K 

X& 

33 

51 c 

Vl~ XA 

17 

36 k 

IXC-XB 

34 

51 "W 



H-t-ru 

35* 

7 4 a- 

b*-rCir>> 

8 «-A- 

9* 

SkJtA#****#' 

86 c 

1mh4-»4.i 

40 

74 C 

VI 

5* 

s 


5-2 

51 kwv 

IXA-XA 


86c. 


62. 

74 K 

VI — IX 13 

tor 

63 k 

IX A 

7 s' 

5-2 j 

iXCrXA 

107 

66 3 

IX&^XA 

So 

90] 

X 

112 

63tv\. 

tXA-XA 

87 

6 >° f 

XA 

M3 

64 a 

IX“X 

S 9 

9o °i 

X.& 

ns* 

6 4 j 

1 X~*XA 

9l 

90 V 

XA 

1 1 »? 

84 wk 

|XA,B ^ 
W.M.F.R 




















































HARAGEH. POTTERY, MIDDLE KINGDOM. 













HARAGEH POTTERY, MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


XXXVIII. 


48 F 48H, 48L 48S 48T 48 V 49 B 49D 49 F 49g 49H 


■■■ 

m 


TOMB REGISTERS, PLS. LVlH-LXU 













































QUALITY OF 

MIDDLE! KINGDOM CR-s wxiv-xui) 


Group No Quauty 

Z .COARSE BROWN,UNPOLISHED. 

3. _ fine brownish-red, red sup. 

S. COARSE BROWN, UNPOLISHED. 

7. FINE BROWN , <1 

9. PINE BROWN, RED SLIP. 

10-11... FAIRLY FINE RED, RED SUP. 

38..... Red, fine bright red sup. 
40-45.-. COARSE RED, POOR REP SUP. 


46.. .. .. LIGHT RED. 

48.BROWN, NO SLIP. 

49.50.. .. RED, RED SLIP. 
S3E...... LT-REO, BUFF SUP. 

53A,FJtl. RED, RCO SUP 


34.RED, REO SLIP 

$6-6l,6&. COARSE BROWN, NO SUP. 

63.RCO, REO SLIP. 

67 .BROWN, NO SLIP. 

67E .. .. light red , Pinkish white slip. 

6s-9o. .. red, red slip. 

9a.DARK REDDISH-BROWN, NO SLIP. 

98 . . ("see section AS) 

99D-J. . . V. OK BROWN, BLACK SLIP, WHITE INCISEO. 

99 S (SEE SECTION Arti ) 


POTTERY 

I XV II TP - XVIll™ DYN/\5TI ES . (Pls. xlu-%lv 


Group* No. 
2-4- • 



Quality. 

fairly fine red, slight red sup. 

5 . . . 


. r 

n ... NO SUP. 

9 . . 



FINE, RED SLIP 

! 1-2.0. . 



Red, red slip. 

29 . 

•» 


BROWN TO BRICK-RED, RED SLIP, 

24- . . 



BRICK RED POLISHED. 

IS . . . 



DRAB TO BROWN, NO SUP. 

16-44 . 



RED , REO SUP. 

46 4 . • 



LIGHT RED , Buff slip. 

52. . . . 



VERY COARSE DARK Red. 

S3 . ... . 



FAIRLY FINE RED. 

54. ■ . 



REO, BUFF SUP. 

SO . 



UGHT RED, PAINTEO. 

93,84 • 



RED , REO SLIP. 

87 • 



Coarse reo. 

91 . . . 



FAIRLY COARSE BLACK. 

92.. . . 



LT-REO, BRIGHT REO GLAXC. 

93 . . • 



LT-REO. 

95... 



OK. BROWN, BROWN SLIP. 

96 . . . 



light reo. Pinkish Slip, brown design 

99 • 



FAIRLY COARSE BLACK. 


R.E. 















HARAGEH. POTTERY. XVII-XVIII DYNASTY. 


XLII. 

















HARAGEH. POTTERY, XVII-XVIII DYNASTY. 
























HARAGEH. POTTERY, XVII-XVIII DYNASTY. 













































1:3 


HARAGEH. STONE VASES. MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


XLVI. 


P KLDYNASTIC 




MIDDLE KINGDOM 



otherwise stated TOMB REGISTERS, PLS. LVUI-LXIl. 





























































HARAGEH. ALABASTER VASES, NEW KINGDOM, 


XLVIII. 












1:1 


im i ■ 


tiUhAN- 


HARAGEH. BEADS, OLD KINGDOM AND 

COLLAR BEADS-63 


HAND Z8 



M o 

y J 

} f Quartz 221 

u 

^PE- 2 

bif Blu.e Glaze 1*83 ■ 

PUCK-5 

\ L Bloc glazed 

g ^cttiry 231 

HAWIVJ 


v Blae glared. 
■ pottery 183 



Cornelian 

183 


DEGRflDEDH-42" 


LEG-30 



b f 



Q 


Camel lan,; 

22.4- 


© 


Cornelian. 

183 


O / 9 r ' cfc r*- 3 ,ai€ i ps 


PENDANTS-44 


3 lu.e glaze D 

231 


Cornelian: 


L Carrvtliarv^ 

5<v* 


si>3 


Careen glaze; t2l 


f.YMNDFRS- 68 


»*« Grfeen glared 

Hfcyisi 


a 


LS 


Cornelian 

22.4 


U 



T?ecL glaze : 18^6 

Ligkt Uue glaze: 6^4 R 


M gS ) Gold, foil: 183 
N gold foil VI 83 

0 green glazed sfadtUV- 

p &r*erv. glaze; 548 

V:c:j:yJ QU*e. hasta: 54$ 

Amel^st; s48 


green glazed 

Ihmesfer 


_none 

m 


While gla^Ctyg 
Camel tarvt igfa 


- ~r^P G-reAn.glaze:zi 5 


Slice basr^.S 9 S 
qaarfe.. 593 


SleayckiVt 

6 I ,52, 

BU4.e glaze /«3 T green. glaze:QOO 


^ j rrrr 


Wkile. steascKistr 
IW 


Red. limestone 
183 


U Cornelian. J 5*48 

V 


Li— 


/Q\ WKtfe. quartz. 
1 ' 183 


[0 f green, glaze 
1 1 231 


green 

glaze 


r?2 w 


^ T~riIZ Z) AmetHySt: ^46 

Black limestone IQfl 


M 


- srensekist 

•2:31 


n r—rr: 


1 


Steals cHv&t - 183 


Brown limestone: \95 
I CoJoJFe : 198 


(O) Green. glazaeL 

pottery 188 


JACKAL-7 ' 


Carrte/ioux 

•S'OO 


RI BBED.BEAD 5 - 4 - 7 0 L-~-~- ?^* ot v , * L> i ? fo 


Green. qlaze:2JS 


SHELL- 52 . 




I White glaze 192 


Light; lrl*»e r I 

glaze ' 

tftk) 


Cornelian* : 1^8 


Dark blue glaze 
123 


LON IQ 

,/ ' _ rr SHELL-34- 


G-reeti. glaze 216 

J L 

BOSS BEADS '54- t- 3 

p - -—, ^reen glazed sreasdust:lS3 
LLrLJ Light Inae. fxislc:593 , Green glaze: 


FLATTENED BARRELS-74 



DOUBLE LION- 



Cornelian.; S48. 


Green glazev 
548 



DROP BEADS--70 


593 


\^y SreoUTft v 1«« 

RING BEADS-85 

Ca.rn.eUan. 2 S 1 


BLae. glaze 

. . .. 183 


Cornelian. I 


* SPHEROIDS-/? 



cr M -TCT—L'i QcuK IrUtt 

\J/ L- ---1 qlaa«: 12.1 


j Ser^trUiae; ,, s —. 

- 22 .| r---- 


>83. 


T 0 RILEM 5 HZ/VT- 3 R 

‘'"'I 

' Carnal i an 1 9 9 




S 


Cornel ion.: tgQ 


Trrll Sreosehist: Hi ' CameLan : 183 J (O Camel«an : i«8 »9J 

185 r->v L-J - _ • _ >ss 


Green, glaze 


231 

I bA B\u.e glaze 

1 231 

•RQG-17 w: 

^777'^ ■ >92-. 


(r 1 Ufisiamga 

G Laf*!* la*'- *9? B 

^7 ctu-aei10.Tv.198 
9Tten.9l<u e; i83 , 


Bone ' <y 

BARREL BEflDS-73 J Ved Je^s^or.: L 


^wkojrtz. 188 
L Cornell an : 800 


A h 


f 




Cornelian. 

183 


—LL^ Cornel ran 

188 *198 231 


^ f ^ Car»'*Uan 

183 


N 


O)^. 


A lodmster 183 

L;_-- J'eintK StentLTfc 185 P 0 Ooli^o.U 


green gUtzc 

231 


trLTTTLLa Cornelian 
D L---J 188 


1 CarnJtUoirv S 9 > • 8<>0. 
N V-I ght Woe P ^ Car nei ian‘, 1 ^ 

800 R QcoirTveliaail^H 

T n white glaze:207 
f(ronu£'. W 

^ y n Lght Woe glaze! %92 
™ Ught greenglaxe 15 


o CJS 


^ vQ ft 8louiH9Uxe 

407 0 y er«n 3 tnxo i 


N /T) Green 
oi< 




glaze 

irs 


l) a 


DEGRADLD-T-41 

@ 



1 njVTTENH) SPHKfifl “ I »”*->» 

<ZZZZ2> q'aie-.SOO E , -\ 

F3 9 te?r 192 X v ,tn 9 , « t; >99 


■j) B>“ae F Red felst>a.r.. 1^3 


>98 

m 


Carnek.an, 59 j G« groea 9 l« t : Y 6 *"***»*»*»■ 

l___j «> p mcr DTft rrr 


. . Green, glaze D 
W 251 


° 1?M. Eelsfar 231 ^ r S" - " 

Co.-rrvel,a;tv221-231 M Q 9«trv «)'«.«.■. ° J QUtwrt 


@»s m s _ * 

T SR '<Z 2 Z> ^ U Uaokti r owa 


DISC BEADS-*) 

800 


BEETLE-2.4- HORNET-2.7 


Gold 

|l|| 19 2 . 


M 



Green. Glaze: 800 


58 

Gold 192 . 


® d s 


RnK ff*iohite 
glaze: - 498 


s -IrlaxK Vr bj-i 

e'.^Tw. 0 oJ^L A r Flin 

188 ' W 3 >‘«: F | P 0 lcuOt- 9 t«« fc 231 

K^T^) SreaficKist 193 . R |[] 6r«.n. jlaie 1 S 9 

a “ whjft glaze 221 


TOMB REGISTERS, PLS. LVI ,LVII 


R.E. 





































HARAGEH. BEADS, MIDDLE KINGDOM 


FISH-19 


Grttn. glaze :6z,o D * 


G*>U ! 
31E, 

* ^ »6 


L- fesA Sard S 32.2, 


Slue ^aste.'. 322 


g Blue 

/ _ , V Green. glaz.e’-66o R 



J V/ Blue j^ustc.: 22,0 


Blue baste‘.5!22. 


JT\ 9 *r: felspar .(3,4. 29 J 
y c:::A Amefoysf : SZ% 

\ Cantdi(uv‘-5’l5’ 




Carneiia*v :322 


N / O 

[L J <3^«-'.37& 


Green. glaze; Zxo 


Gv-. jets [>ar: 54/ 


• gla-xe^Z^ 


APE- 2. 


3fe<iGfe.-.372. 


G-retn. 3 Iaxe 6^0 


y AA Ll'melton.e.'SZS, 

fcJ \ 

j\_ Gv. Jell far: 547 

W Am.eKysL.522, 

„ A\_ &rt qltt.xe.3aH, 

X Ql 

Y ^ Lgkir blue glaze 1 9 J 

Wfute gloL*e:Gi2. 

JACKAL-7 
G ff ^ 3 

1/ \ G-reen. glaze : 91 


FLY-2.2 


Ca.rn.el i a.r\_S ^7 


Green. glaze.: 322. 


Li gK£ blue 
glaze-. 62-0 


7^^ ' LqWC blue glaze 

w ^ 


HEART 2 .6 


DUCK-5 


Blue gIaxe : 530 


/ lilu-e 
j glaze 
* 871 


Porphyry: 312 . 


HAWK-5 


Gv- tfpyi oj azt 





greea glaze; 

2 ^ 


\ M UgKJt blue glaze: 

/ ( J £61 


gveea glaze-.322, 


AmefRysL; 5V5" 


HAND-28 


SHELLS - 3J 


LION-10 



" & 0 m.' 


blue. a laze; 

620 3 


UT\ Carruel ian:3 


^ Steatite :3o6 


Green. glaze : 22 o 


Carnelran.:»o3 


Green glaze : 2 . 9 | 



CuriuliAn, 391 



** ^ blue. Jsjaste.: 


« Q o b5 “'&r 5l ““ 


DOUBLE! I.ION-HEAD- II 




Itnifatibn. 

"Eu-rc^uoise 

fcfeS 




green. glazed. steatite.: 

522. 


HARE- 12 
CROConirr"- 



Gold: IJ4 ■ 3o8 


Gold: 336 


Decayed, gla.xe: 

pottery) 5^2 8 


-y (0 J Liaktr blue 
^ ^ graze 661 

Ligkir IrCu* glaze; 

TT^ /v?s Ui 



G-old; 534 312. 154 



Ugkt blue glaze - 524* 
62.0 


Green, glare.: 110 


5HELLS-3T 


. Sot 
ly. glaze szf) 


SHELLS-56 


Green, glaze Z.ZO 
Camel (dn.: 6i 2.- X 7 J+ 
La|»is lazuli: 6(2-124 
Green, pelsjsar: 124 


@ la|s'rt lazuli: 9 
'lu.v’g^toiee: 9 

'Turgi'ifdi^e 9 

.. Ca.rn.eLan. : 3 ll 9 
[J Gold Jfoil : 9 ‘ 


BOLT- 57 


f M Iq) Sleasckist 291 


UZA T- 38 



0 ) Green, glaze .661 


p Blue glaze : 530 


-£7<3 Green, glaze ■ GzO 

H DCT 2 0 ^.'•Lagl a.ze;Z20 

N 0 GYiaru glaze ; 6zo -2ZO 

^ - &T<€n glaaenzo 

R ^ Y<WJrv f«l*j=“-r ♦. 12.4 


S ^ L ~— 5 ^ *^9^ blue, glaze 244 

b* Green, glaze .* 52fi 

^ Q Ligkrilue glaze 271 


TOMB registers, pls.lvim-lxiu 


O h Car nel t on: 90 

W Green. T«ls|>ar: 30 
















1:1 


HARAGEH. BEADS, MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


LI. 


i^ADED,FORMS -41 PENDANTS - 44 - 

SJB Green glaze • 6l2- U^kt (due 


MISCCI.LflNEOUS-58 FLAIL BEADS-fel 


(o) Green glaze: 62.0 


Green glaze.: 


~ 4 Slack Lcmesrone.: 0 

V \ ^7 


< 0 reerv glaze. 


een. feiarf>ar 


Green glaze; 524 


LigVvt IrWe. glaze • 


pjr"l joj Green glaze-22.0 


Gveen- glare.: 66 ( 


pJB GT ^ 9 

m::® 


Da caged, 
glaze. 

sze 


o\ Green. 

I felspar 


Qveerv Gl^e 
1 


E f 1 ^ | L» nteslfme 

V / / 306 ' 


0 Green. 

glaze. •. 324 


T b h 9r *^ fds{,ar: 


AtjaJt: 31 - 


W f\ ft joints ler 




0 A Green. glaze: 

j 6 zo 


qreen. glaze 
1 547 


V / \ Uuais lax: 

( J 3ZZ 


G) u ?0 


Sfea-sokist; 524 


|BJi:rx3::© ! 

sss Green, glaze : Si 5 


glare 5 $7 


7°\ “ 


*T\ Grefcn_ l 

O ) SteascKi'st 

w/ 524 


DecevveO. glaxe: 
528 


—'O GV«n. 1 

^Iom J 

° J 34S 


0 \ 

J -fels^r- 32.4 


\ Ga.rn.ek<m- 

5*5- 


Ivory: 661 


RIBBED READS-47 i 



^reerv glaze 

HO 2,01 


DecoLyacC glaxe 


Black glaze 

gr't-n. glaze 

12-7 


STeatUe. 

620 


\ Wood-280 
Green, 
glaze 


i T""‘\ D°-rk 

j { \ green 

| | V glaze 

\ «o 5 :no :280 

Cem: 108 ! 

! ! \ Gr«ta glaze: 

I 1 A 4 - 9 . 1 fct .17 



Green glaze 
43*‘"71 


COLLAR BEADS-63 



0 Brown, glaze 
. 6l4 



mDED FORMS^ 

I Lj^kt Ij-Iujl glaxe 244 


Wkite. alaxe: 

* 12 ? 


SB-sass - lST*” 




Green 

qlaze: 

I^O 


/A Cern.elian. 


Gree.ru 2 .bO 

\ glaze. 

|s^ G ^ 2 z:::@fe 


Green- glaze m / \ CameJidn 

z 6 o (—7 ZG5- 


} Green, glaze S _ 

£. 2.0 Y 

Tu.ro cm3 * se 72. 

La^is : 72 - 

Cqj- ae.ltan' 77. 



Qoldfo.t :72:(54 q 

CRUMB BEADS -50 


Gz^ fol Ga.rn.ekd.rt. 

M / \ 336 


Blue. glaxc . . 260 


Green glaze: 612 , 


Jfrrrz^ 0 tjgkt ly'Lue glaze: Gtz. 

fSTE 

]^1 6reerv glaze: 349 


(rrten.'- 5l5 : 62-3 

y BtO-ctC: 124 

3pU'~ 5%%:524:SZS 


fol Grown. 

/ \ Steatite, i _ 

^14 1 -<5&— S *° 



Car n-elia-n. 
515 



S22 - 


L /Vitnl 


GARTONNAG-E BEAD-52 


O I Green glaze.: 6 i*j_ 


Green glaze‘.542. ^ 


0 Green, gl aze: 6z.3 


4 Ligkt Hue glaze 

] U> \ 


T Q ftlack glaze: 5Z* 

u (XT’© j 

V : 6 * 2 . 

. _ _ - _..._ SteaSciusK 



C foj l-'(due gla 

623 


Alo-lte^rtf 660 



green 



[0 


Diori_te 612. 




TU.rg^u»«se: 2,^1 



Blue glaze. 
66 l 



SerbenJine, 
1 SZZ 


Blue glazei 64O 


Vcunou-6 (eagtfts 



Green 

glaze.;. 

67 


U*qkt Wue. 

glaze: 339 


TOMB REGISTERS, PLS. LVlll-LXIl. 


9 - 105 . iio. * 9 T4en - 

























124 

139 -284-6io 
/ a. Six* *117 


Y\ |=—• ----— — -Green glaze. 17 


CYLINDER BEADS-68 


u 



HARAGEH BEADS, MIDDLE KINGDOM 

COLLAR D ROPS 65 DROP BEADS-70 BARRELS - 75 

^ Gl-vck ^>asl2 : S2.6 


LI I. 


12.4 • | 6 Z_ 


flmeltiifst': 311 
G"<xrntt !. *2-4 



— A &vce.n. glaze: 613 


Green. feist*** \. 124 


Limestone. : 612 , 

H Ok-YX 40 ) Corn. 72. ’ HaenxntiJe - 3*6 • NN- 

r . . . • liacsis t • 96 

Cornelian.: 612 ,1 £j£S> fGr>i^fo\^ 7 i 

7 Btu-eolazo:# 


Green glaze 
529 

I* 

Cornelian: 60S 


yBlu.eglaze^f ___ 

-1 er-adluc. 50 Amelfy jC: 306 • *36 

5*6-138-2.2.0 \-' 


BUtc jpoyte 


f PT—- 


j UgKt W*xe glaze; 661 


SreaS^USt . j^zp- 324 
Steatite *372. 

Ser f>erUVn.e • Z.9 |. 

Sr«-OLSck» st": 32-4 ■ 612 . 
Wkit%. glaze; S 04 
yellow limestone • 5Z$ 


SVeasckist": 336 

Green glaze: HO 


1 k --- 1 Green. HO -131 

1 * -~~l glass: 

Green, glaze •'17-138 
-- ~-~~~ Ligh.b Wole glaze: 2.71 . 

Green glaze :6l2- 
SPeias ckisf: 31 2. • 135 • 356 

4S’. [S^unre seet n 135J 

Ugkt Wae glaze: 28 S- 66l 
Green, glaze: 67.139. 605. »7 


Green. -fiU^Mlb-339 l 
LgKt U^ 3 la ** , 8f? 31- | u BUl« basft. 62*1 S Q AbwJKyst: 32-2. 

Cuiil.un'. t7-339- 520 ) N G-rten. 9 l<Liei sV 

,-- , ' ^ Bl^etee.OL-.56|if^| L.qht lAui glaie . fcfcl 

l^g Gw'.aiaa.iao ^ trrrrrrnrrrr^ Bu.eW.eaKF l^j 9 ^ 

&«^ 9 la**.«o co«*l.«v<'S- 7 a 


C arne( inru •• 
6 zo 


•rCEe* ^Rjl^es - 336 


Red. mwul. 4 

I UgKt* Wm« gt: 522 


J Q Gololfsil i 211 

© Blue. |»asr«. S-ZO'522. 


Cornellw6ofl _ lUghTlrWegl: 5 EZ " _ r . , 

t & hbj|Lter K sn&w 4 h 

|-r^^ e , 37 z ^ 37^ 

j —^— i green. 

•pEEEEE^na' k 

fo) Green.glaze-.142 , • —--Graen-ql J’lS 

L.-qWt.WLii «M. L ‘ ■gftJSiWvS,.. J s -6 

W&l.mtifcMCttl kzzz^i Co.v ^uCTj? l 

m Gr.m gl: (Wifi. 

R£3^ Blue gb 91521-526 521 

Li'gnfc Woe glaze : 66 1 



Green. 

glaze 


Greeru glazed. 
SreatLte: g-o 


ftlue ^<usr«;i5- 3ZZ 
Black glaze: 6zo. 


1= 

La 


Y 


Camelian: 66 i 
Green glaze ’. 52O 


Mm nl nl 

^ Green. ^els^Uz^ Green gl: 555 " 


-n Steoickist: 324 

- -[ Ljgkf ItUajC ^aste ; 37 ^ 

BLae glaze: 91 * 
d r .Sleasckist 3-79 • iZ 2 

O r m:_ > J <5re«-n Glazev 30-6S'-S2* 11 6 • lIS’ l'3'V 143- 159 »7t 190. 25S'- 23 - 4 - 371 . 2>^o I 

l ] BLaaG-Eoze; I04-265-3ZO-336 34^* 377-660 I 35- 3»*5- 600- 6oz,-66o 

b.peca.yed..G-laxe-. 2^4 • 528 • 36S 1 


x:>. 


Cornelian. • 124 
^3 Green, ^els^ar: 1 x 4 
Blae glaze :660 


Cornelian: 1x4- 6l3 
Green, felspar : 1x4 


Dark Uux glaze: 66 | 
° 2 . I Carreeiian.: 2-65 


(r - iMi 

p (7 -- 1 j&y»eT^ 9 la.i.fc: g3 l20 122 I28 23S-284 ■ (32.-S 26 

r I _} ^ Dark IrUce. zxo 

- ( Da_rK lrCu.tg|a.z» SiS UgKt Uu.t 3 ( 0 ^^ ; 190 34 .) 


,A 


Rn 


V/ 


Green. 

glaze: 

lo^ 


,o6 “ 6 ' 18 - 357 

VLigh^t trtu.* 9 1 a.-z e ^ 109 IIO.S3Q 

K 



jy 


green, glaze; 5*9- 70- 358-359’394 • 524 • 614 
6>U*.e glaz<ti6a. 

COLLAR END PIFC.fS-64 


Cornelian.; 805, 

G-yeen qU 3IZ- S2Z 

5Z1 

Graded te P 3 

Black glaze: SS 5 *- 620 
r 3 Green, glaze: zzo- 623 

Cornelian, 005. T?ed- marl: 4 

_ Cornelian i3-67*12^ 

^£r3) Green glazs : 32Z 

Btaxk glaze.* S22 



BUce glaze: 
190 : 32.0-34 {• 614 


Grte.iv gla-zc-, 

BMI82S4-. 


gretn. glaie. 

104 .-IIS I 43 


TOMB REGISTERS, PLS. LVi»H L*li. 


R.E. 









































































HARAGEH. BEADS, MIDDLE KINGDOM AND PREDYNAST1C. 


Lin 


BARRELS -73 cont? 

Q -Blue glaze:2-6o 




Blue glaxe:526 


Ri-O- 
Rj -O- 
M-•<=>" 


G*r*en. glaze.: 5*0 
Camel va.ru 7 2- 1^4 
Lux^ts laz; 72 - 
Green. f*lsl»ai*;72. 
Turquoise.; je~ 

G-otc L.72. 


SPH EROIDS -79 

Blue gla.ee *. 530 


AmelKyst- *38 • S3* 
Ca.frvelian.- 372, '331 


f j j Blue tr green, glaze 4 

IT 7 1^1397- J99'530 <2O 

v y i>bo 



RI NG BEADS - 85 

LigVvt blue glaze,*66i 

Carftelto-n, ; 52.0 


WKirt. 9*«e : 3»6« 

Lgkt blue gla.ef .333 
OsErtck. egg: 2 . 60 '520 

Cajcr\mX\ an. : 66 o 

fi Green. glaze ; 5X0- 603 
Ligkt Hue gleit '• J14 


Camel i an. : 661 


Q gold, foil: 133 - 


— s^ZZZ- ,TT^ l*gkt Wu*. glaze*. 661 

CcurrveUaTu: 306,5(5, 6/2. ( 

v Blue ^azte; ZZO 

\z z ~z ^ Greerv glaze: 2,20 

^ £l!ir©--^D Green glaze: 6*2. 

X Green, glaze.* »2>f. 526 

fl ATTENED BARRELS 
74 


RU. ^*l*|»«r:l39 


0 


Blue X* areea glaze: 

Oo • 61 • l 41 • 336 • 389 • 397 


glaze: 236 



§ 


Serp*niTm.t: 33 9 


r Car at l * arc: 38 • 391 ■ 5XX 

528 531*6X0 6x0 
ArTveltyst: 2.7* 1 531*602. 

H aem.atCte '■ *** ;N 
^Gretn. felspar : 38 

"Red. -felspar ; 52.6 
Am clay sc : 3H • 50.6 
I Green feiejaar 311 • 33*5 
Garnet; 271 • 38-5■ 5x6 
^Carntl 1 arc*. 33 6 • 385- 5X6 
KecL jasper : X 31 
Green. -^els^ar Jz. 

Lo-|»»s Laz. 7Z 
AmeFKysfc J2. 


*@ 

*0 

*0 

■0 


Black glaze ; 555 
green, glaze: 38 

green, felspar: 389 

Arn.etK.yst ; 397- 


Cornel ian.: 31X3X05X0 

. • $ 

Ceurn.el 1 azc: 620 ^ u * a ’ T '^* i *^* 

Gold. fo\l : 72 . 
fraraet ;«803 

GRADED BEADS 

Lup.s lax. 72 32.6 

CameWart; 7- IS-23.72. 9‘■ IZ4 • *<l-22-0 • 2.9-4--2S-6 
3ofe- 311' 312. J1&-336 - 372 379 - 39< 396 
SI 5-520- J2.1 J2V Jig • J30 • S"3i J39 ■ S83 

6ii 6<j-6io- 62 . 3 - 6 z». 8-o3 rfo 3 

Ga.rn*t: 40114- ISA- ■ 2lt 3S6' 379' Sll ■ 522S19-S30S33 
l TurajuatJC: 7^.-91 326 

> A^ttKyst: 9lS40fc772''’r2V5V2'l 220 2UV2J631I 
1 311-336-J96 J22 J24 533-530 J83 

4u_ fei*.sos. 

Qold 4oiL •• 7 : 2S6 

q-reaT,. f*l*|.<u.. lAl lrt 3II-3I2 353 


M ^ q ) Car«\eli<m.:522 

p Sr«a jlaie:S6 

AXir DARRELS - 75 

& Green, glaze: 200 ,555. 

F g La^is laz: 72 . 

, G03 g BU ~ |*«r*:35e 

L Q Li jkt bUia. 3UJ»€:Z4^ 

"Ol 


M © CameUan.: 326 ,- 365* 391 


p r j AmetKyst: 515 


R flmelKyst 3ll*fel0 


S r~—*■—j flm.eJKyst-.l54- 

~ Alalraster : 551 


Pink lrme»l6n.e; A-B- 


DISC BEADS-32, 


§ 

§i 


Green, glaoe '■ 50^ • 6xo 
Green, felspar: 9* 


WKift. glaze*. 56 



Black glaze : S04- 
WK«ft glaze: 804- 
'RedL glaze • 804 - 
LafMS laz. 4o 

6 Q 1 WKite glaze *• 336 

V Ujkt Hue glaze :660 

H 0 ) Green, glaze: 80 44 -g 

660 


i 0 


Camel 1 an,; 326 

f COv*. ■ U * . lutioTi 


Camel i an.3 O 6 


QATTFNFD SMOIDS B 

80 *0] 
rg J 

biikt Wue 359 


fBliuk jlaze: 583 

■■.;>.ill gla.ze: S»».<i»* 

L? IrW Jiasll: 322 S03 -511 
If Hu.*, glalt: 249 336 tw 629 I 
.OflLrklrlu* gta.xe.;3vl'5l6'628^ 

L 1 ^KiT Hu* (jl j.z e.; tab o 


l IPPFO BARRELS 

76 

t© ( 6 ) 


gh.t tluc glaze: 661 


O 1 ' 



Ca.rn.eltan. : ~fL. 

La^'«s laz. : 72 - 

fgrean. glaze.: 520 -603 610 620 

0 j Slo»ck qloie: 6i2- 

CLtghJt Wut glaze: xzo : 260 


ID ark blue glaze: 260 *660 


Green, glaze‘.504- 
Black glaze:3X0 
Ligkt blue glaze'.300 


TOMB REG\STERS, 
pus. uvuv-uxu. 


£ Green glaze; *4-0 


L«xpt$ lai.v 600 
Green glaze ^91 


F © 
& 0 


M 0 
p g 


'l Block glaze:38*515* 6lO 
1 Dark blue glaze ■• 661. 

\ Ligkt Glue glaze: 247 - x 6 o X 7 / 

( 396 

\ I WKirt. glaze : 5»s. 


Blue glcwz^ : 5 XO- 
G^een glaoe> * 5 - S 2 .I 
Black glaze*. 644^ 

{ Blue glaze • 530*5X4- 
Gnccn. glaze : 524- 
Black glaze; 15 *320 *312. 
WK'tte glaze : %\l 
Ugkt blue paele : 803 • 660 
U 9 kt tlut pusn.; 006 


Blue basic. 306 
583 


REDYNASTIC 


38 

q (rr**n. 415 


9 


Quarts ^ebWt 4-15 

68 

j -Black glazecL 

© sreaUrel?) 4-5$ 

79 

ft l^uartj.; 4lS 

85 

^ Q Blue glaze: 4*2.!2» 

D g Green, glaze : 4-S9 

<5 P Blue glaze: 4^-X* 


[Qreen glazed. 406 
Umeslane 4-15 


Gyeen. glazecL 
limesT6ne: 


4-15 


T0r*lB REGISTERS, PU. UV 


R.E. 




























1:6 

IUGK -5 

Black steatite: 667 


HARAGEH. BEADS, NEW KINGDOM. 

hFr.RflDFn FORM Si-41 HISCELLftNE0U$-5S 





Cornell an: 313 



Xx9j>er: 671? 


3 ia.±fc 467 B 

DC(X’1I42 


PWK-5 


d 





s «° 


Gold : 66 5 

BUte glass; 662, 
Green. glaze: 663 


BUte gt-ass: 665t ® 


Uqfvt l^Uxe glaxe: 
SSt 


LtgVVr IHue gl ft-Zt. 

Z7O F 


G+ ««jt- glaz«: 556 H 



Dark Ueuu, 
-y tllow arxcL. 

glass' 669 


FLAT- m^-A 


BU^e 




6«sl, 





Blu.* glass. 662 . , 

~ v t 7 r p,r " O..0 Ss» 


8 


w A Blu.e ylo-ss. 66z. 


|PTOTOTflMUS -3 FLV -22 

M R Grea.n-gla.xe . fcfel 


g p coiLflR BEBDS45 

PENDANTS-44 


Dark Iriuje glass: 669 


1 si 


Green. ^/ctz.t.663 


Dark Mae qlaze: 

581 



/a 


"Red glass: 663 uu 

Dark IrUee glass W >9 (_| A D 1 y _ ^ 



tROf.ODILE-15 
"*JHv 5 . . 3 i"f 



Dtcayed, glaze : 
2.70 


Blacks u>kife horary : 
662. 


TURTLE -15 


^•AyV Ca.trixel*an.: 665" 



HRND-28 

Light" IrUte. glo-ze.: 
5*81 


mu -52 


■ "0 L 

■m 


Green, baste: 
'667 


Blue glaSS'- 581 


Green glaze*. 
667 


Limestone: 678 



I ^id. 

1 313 


SPHEROIDS -75 


(mw gla.-xc 
*669 


0 BLce basM: 
5"81 

*> © 


-667 


Brown, glaze. 
363 J 


0 


BtexkAwwat 

glass: *7 O 


q*@ u © m © 

V 7 — ftBfa r- 

WKjie^L. 58i; Carndl**;66* 


0 Black gfaSS 

_ » CYLINDERS -68 s | „JL , 7 





Cornelian. 662 665 ; B FT Dark Uu«. 

O glass SB 

N t t Cameliarv; 593 g 


'***& FLRT-SPH--80 


B 


Cornelian 

581 


Ca.rrtelia.ix. 665 


Red l»aste: 66 *f 
Blue baste: 664 
RecLgvass: 667 
^*-dj*.$b: 678 

L t-1 !"••»•!«» n. I V"S tarn-e It an:fel>7 

L - UgHt &Ua.4L gkicsBi y—A Red felspar.-667 

DftDDCI C -~ 7 X ^ J 


PiARRELS-73 





I Cctrrte fiaiv- 
66 ? 



p e suffiatefr fa 

Corr^'orv p- Q UgKt Iriue g.la*.e . 5«6 


__ 556 

Light OLu.e glass- 

669 C f—* Gamelicun: 586 


Ccuraelkui: 58 I 


LOTI IS-39 S1 TO MiZ 


fwA 


6 b(fiA^r' 


FISH - 13 


•£ 




f 


BUte glctss 581 


Cornelian.: 665 


Cornell pert: 665 


Camel io_n.: 581 


Grew, glaie : 581 . 


Cornelian.-. 5 «l 


CarndiAn.: 665 
Green (oasfe: 581 


1?ad Jasper: 678 



6 **&r» , * r 


J GBIITJ fry Uue glass 

K g T-'-'-X j 66/ i 

M Stto-tOe . 667 

laxe-- c 


Cornelian: 561 


BOSS BFftDS-54 

L ^5^ Blu.e tasllt 


q green, glass; 581 


RING BEADS 85 

^ |J Li ghjt Iliac 
y glata: fefe^ 

^ Oraan. glaze: 67® 

^ f© Ccurnol iom> 

O SM- 533 

N Fj Camtiio-n: Ce"7 

S I 

X oSUabU. LiaWrLUre qlaze 

0 &C&rntJift.n: 667 


White. gloLoa. 

*70 O g OsIVl'ch, eqq:<t 2 C63 

p eW glass j s , 

6 -fellow glass S | l,gh£ IW glaze : 270 


I RIDGED BEADS-86 


» 7 » 


Green, qlaze: C63 


MULTIPLE BEftDS-55 T 


CarnU4W554 BngWrtW glnxe. 


O' Green glass: 669 

J 


yellow glass 556 

D @ Camelian: 665 


n 


w 


6 bZ 


W 


glaze. 

363 


§ 


585 


Green qlaz.£.’ 

66 J 


D ISC BEftDS-32 WeR S - S7 

r t:| Carat |iarv'. 6 fa 7 - ‘ F—”"■"■*■ " 

LJ. I Dark Irraw*. * 

d R C I Ql*SS. 4>b9 I 


TOMB *EGlSTEB.S Pe.LXlH. 


. I DarK ITTOW* a uoiw 

Si 

S S BLre HttUwfglaze 67s * 3 3 

»”**■ 66 ? 


678 

R.E. 


































GRAVE 


E 


SO]S'i0 




^0 5 
H0& 
Ml 5 
W.|b 
W 




M j 


HER 
m h 

Mf? H 


c. a. 


|5-7«HO 
4 S' 7 o- 3 S 
40-70 -to 

145 85/5 
SO-8&-50 
40-80-k 

35.70.35f 

40 - 5 S -45 

35 - 60-35 

4S 8O-40 y 

55-8050 y 

,80-160-75 


W 


S 

s 

-1 


dsw 


,<?JV 


tF* 


W 


po-so-fo 

50-70-501 y 

|gP*Hy 


40-80-35 


[35-65-15 
63-87-35 
3S-40-I5 
4-5 55-40 y 

40-75-2-5 

30-40-15 

35-40-40 

45-70-3O 
4S-70-3O 
75 80? 
45-45 - 7 
15-40-30] 


| 4 o- 6 oas| 

50-70 

35- 45-201 


W 


No ! 


tEtc- 






((Half fUWeKr^ife) 


HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. PRE- AND PROTO-DYNASTIC. 

POTTERY 


p_ 

(pLsfid) 


R 

(Pu XXVII d XXVII) ) 


L 

R..X 2 M 


M 


M 


M 


4 nuill 

2.3 d. 

Fnagt 

4.0 «. 

40 g. 85m. 

BZ,bi 

Z3rr,2-4Kp S2.lr 

82.6m 
Tybe- 6 CD(S«e WW)j 

1 /K>e-9Z«n 1 

24- g 4 -oe 

4-0€- ( 
24 -d. 40 e 
1+k 7S5 


44-u. 68am 6963 8/f 

( 663 69 ttv'74a-"84t34k 

1 S' ‘f 

69a 79-fr «4-h 
66a.764 844Ys 85n 

69 toa Beoyds 85 } 

66«. 

6$g . ,.«4l 


7dt2b 

7A 


7«L 


I No I 


Mo 


No 


Alans of- graves Pu XIlP ) 

35- 6o-4S y No bone-S 




66<C69k" 

^6a, 760L 84 k- 

66 air 84-k 

34 a. 66 0-63 76v 84 -k 
6 Sc 765 84 -k I 

(tSc.’JSm'jGd, 


8-Zj 


7S 3 

8zL 

4-6«- 
85 m 
47K 71m 94^9Sa] 


7$l 


660 

49“- 

66a_ 
26 ol 660 . 
69c 
663 


74-ir 

«1$>4W 

< &4h.‘<8'5c 

S4k' 
8-4-1 


rr^l>€. ft iiciowi 


66b<j 17k 

440.663 6963 
56-691 74-6 
76 k 

654 763 84 k | 53 a_ 


65c 84k |53oc 

44-uc 68a. ^ 84kC 

44.0c 69 begWk. 7S3 

74 a. 85c 

69 3 , 

69 c ek! 

£>9 bek 1 

(>bcL.lr 84 -k 

6963k 74 o- 75 n. 

69 be kbit 
69 bkk' 

69 6k! 74<a. 

(sk tU. beod.4 ”!) 

fegbeWl 

44.cy.65e 69636-740-75-3 

69 (regk.lt 74-0. 


w 


•4221 


7<*- 


STDNEl 

Pc -Xtvi 


ZZ. 


2 . 2 . 


22. 


Grave not trax-exL. 


7“ 

7<6 


4-7c 

0 - 


2:5 


Z pint f-lakeS. Alabaster joot PuXXV,N° 7 . 

Pot5 81 C 8* 81 f -filled. ton ttC ckopped strata 

(1- Krt'f el 

tia.ttTnq.fl.nt ^a-ke^Yagt decora t«<LP|lT5>y 

Fa-n.cs pottery F 85Vi [PL -2S512< PM 

3 /ac/f Polished ftotfiry F II 


18 


2-7 
32 b 


75 


REMARKS 


S<)/uxcv«. ruJrt-»r»g’Storut. S r^lvwA ca^s on. ^>ots 

Bent piece, of- Copper wtne. . "toe exert (? )_ 

_ _ 1 Stowe vo.se.Pi-XXV.5 


D03S tones (c remains of mefrirvg 


- 1 Black pottery F<y t K (y 

Fr o-g Is of -Clint knife . Tart of ivory *)»oon.,PL® N? 
FrctotS of bronze bourl ^ need/e. f lixE^lakeR 
FrctgEs bronze, -fti-nt" Wwife. Sr b e ced S f Pl V/)| I\| 2 *-Sw 56 - 6 o 
BeddS 586j 793 8 Sj m 


LV. 


5.0 

60-66 

5o-66 

[so-56 
56-57 

36-71 

42-70 

56 

46-66 

|55-57 

56-57 

56-57 

55- 58 

56- 6o 


Limestone, forekeecd. [n'eeetf )fk£LV! 
G-niertOt . Tots oyl\ aJtr N. end of 3-rave - 
Frngts 0$ breccia. Pot 3> beads lyjse 85o. 
Fo-rvcy pottery F 80 rt 


Fraxjti of decorevted. joottery 

DecoroW.f>dlr Pe^N° 2» PLWClNZt 


Traces of rr.aJtfng 

TfoLces of nvatti-ng . 


BlctcV, polished. ^>>t f 9lQ 


3S 


45 " 


Fctwcy f locked. Knife Pt.>{H N? 4 Breceik 
bet PcXXV.NS I^A-rtcertoyin if S»m« (rvtn«d) 

53 a. Conlaj ned. -f ett. 

53a- con.Vot.ned— -fat. 

Frctgls of-ivory [>'m. Beads 6«e.8Sd.- 
For oro-re bkitP.See R..VI, N? 4.Siy qaartj marbles 
T7otces of LcVhn 3 [ before f^e^ 

For limestone .jotr see Pi-Xx7 ,sj " 9- 

No Face of bones 

Bored pebble No ya« objedS found. loJetKer 

For sta-te bowl See- t\_5SS7,N2 6 . 

Flint knife ft-forked Wee Pi-.W N?5 Id-2. 

Basalt Z. karvdlcd ]pot PtW Z T?ed- 
amalet Pu yT.ISlo 3. Banal PtVT N? \ . Woodei-C 
Trctces of malting over body. Vg-pve<- fe ^ otr _ 
Black Polished Pottery F 85rt . 


Blctck top Pot 3 97 j i Black [Polished, pot F 83 m 

Forked lamct. ,^^ 8 -Fl^Iji.'RmegP- k <2 -- 


[47-58 
55-58 
SZ-58 
SS-S8 
6l 7 ;- 
|44-63 

55- 58 

Ss-ss 

5 6 - 60 
55-58 
47-58 
45-65 
55-58 


|6o-? 3 
56-7 
58-55 
55-ss 
4i ? 
36-60 
36-68 
55-58 
SO-il 
188-65 
5o- 51? 
58-6o 


6)-65 
57-60 
|47-58 
57-6o 


PROTO-DYNASTIC, S. D. 73-80, 0-1 DYN. 

Pottery Pi- •• 50^ feo[> 75 I 83 m ■ I ft It joots to IKe N' of- tKe grave. 


PANCtRAVT period (?) 


476 

w 

w 


D Irt skotttow elUj>r>cod. ^>it. No ben.eS 

s|. - 


R>tter^ Pl . 


5- 13-35- 40 

10 65" 

27 ■ 60 • 69 


skell unttC golfery 


:6 




B 


Poft A - D ct^bear /j 6e jtroto dynastic vaJKkr FCajrc. 
Jbredyrvaf/i'c r 60 /t graves 4/4 d-474 were robbed. 

So , Since /Fere cyt/tcajrs to be dow-W." as /S w6.c/X«i" 
a. 7/ /Ft 7>o/T are o^ one period, (Key cere msertid. here. 







HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. OLD KINGDOM AND FIRST INTERMEDIATE. 


NS STONE 
__ __ 


BEADS 


Pl. *uiy. 


R E. M A R K S 

FrcLqt* of- lkp of woo den. HeadrfeS hat He aA of w - * « rT ' clJc - tod Y 
Pot at Look of vwait^aUlrOLsrex- under ^Hjxnd of -female. . 
Bronze mirror Pu **H1 .Wel.^Borve. Pm Pu_**v\\ . M2 Z_ 

Flihb flakes . Sjoi-ixe of shal -fish 


' 68 Q (tJJbtxr (run ail j Fli-n.tr flake 

— ([Lower burial) 


. NEcotner. Atab-aster N.W-Cw-nei . Pot" rrncl. F Side. 


H eadrest PuVlM.Ne^- • £• Chamber rolted . 

Animal BoneS. 


Carved headrest Pi-. IX ,NO 7 PVik.tr Flake- - Jseese^y 

Sui.oSc.«A.».fc;»i*t<>f«^-9». p^-ESL; _- N tT%' T J 

_ _ Wooden headrest, Pu..Vm,N°^-. Coffer mirror Pl*K!!J m -6- 

Children.^. tomb. See Section. 6A 
. _ Hea-drest Pu! V/Ui., N 9'7 ■ Cattle. tones . 

Hfeadresb Pi- WT . M° S • 

~ _ Flint knife- Sa.ndsl~5nfe PaJeltfe. . 

63 n 6«v Headrest Pu VU I, N° 5*. tye ffom carte.T.na 5 e. . 

3Zw 70m Skfe.lt Comb. Serrated -f liYit . 

Sticks ard sandals . Coffin of MERERY . P«- Lx£, No.3. ***-87 
“ _ | Cone code d'Trulrfe joints on b-ottC Coffins. 

' I . Tottery headrest Pu Wt, M? & " 

I I Inscribed Headrest >U VTQ Ns 6 NamelHYNES TamTed woc4 g 

85 jb Bronze -mirror- Pu XJUIJ N?A- 


18E> - 

;tr 6 - 
I88- 
i«3 
I9Z. 

193 - 

- 

» 3 f - 

19(0 

197 

19a 

Z0\ 3>A,S,b 
ZoZ. 

%Oj> 

zoif 

ZoS 

ZoG 

ZoJ 


Headrest, Pu \7iTi ,N° 3. 

Blue S^anqU Leads Bronze -mirror PuWH.N^ 5 (u.nder head.) 

” ~ Pcl^vw- 2 Trta.ftv'n.j . 

2K5-allk^m30f3?rA44.54K f Fmamtnt oS mirror idmve Mirror 

S7lr6«dgkny70s 73cfKmn.o t Qold femalets and { ’*°~ ds —’ . • ( , f* a Coffin 

79HI frOu im^wy i Godv, <m ask . Onfe (roard , d»aVdf»4 * ° ” 

_ _ 2, HodieS extended . One Semi -contracted. . 

/ _ _ i-fioitc. 

. . . , r* i • a L J O, YY tJO I gc 'Tburt of QroiA-^> , Pu Tx 5 • Flint 

SK-H-Ta^n 3 *bA ^3 6 «jV 73 bcl 7 M Cy(,nde\' F«.ad ' ^ N ' .. a luf MO L, 

3 3 Q2r \gsj Sherd uAttt radfe bento-qra m on d r . h jHj ■ N-*Q 

17 m 3 «dg 5«t68go73r80* 85uy gold Scarab- & treads . Pu XLfY 24a. 5 


73r y ^r 3 ^l^ K *is«s. M-t •""“•x.. 

5 sK 7 o 3 Tinf^ ss-Kjv 32 .J 

1 I fttmeuns of SiV coffms,mot mscrilred. t-al-tKicklj Veneered. 

- Bronze mirror Pu folil , N2 (3 . 

aou- _ ' " 1 • “ 1-/ 11 


7 ^<^ < a; 5 ‘t i Pots.N e 6l IHem) ifT-Sidfe SKaU. 



£ “ 
tC to 
lU (/ 

c* H 

g 5 


COrriNi SHAFT CHAMBER CHAMBER I 


i N E ^tsicU 
N up £xFM 


_ n - e • o 

No 45 60-55 


h n e lo I 


POTTE R Y 

(pu - xxxiii ) 


?. 5y 
S 9 'sh y 
^4 C N« 
6)4 c y 
6 lBC y 

63 C No 


N W £x.t* 
N - - 


126 c 

145 C 


147 c 
14% C 

149 C 

150 C 

;I5I C No 

IS5C y 

156 C No 

157 C No 
15% y No 

173 No No 

174 C No 

176 . c 
177 c 
!79 c 

ISO c No 
1%I C 
183 C 

M 

185 c y 

W6C 

m c 

l«9 C 
197. C 

193 c 

194 c 

195 c 

196 C y 

'9? c 7 

198 C NO 
Zoi C y 
2 . 02 C y 
£03 C y 

204 C y 

20 5 C y 

206 C 4 
ZQ'JC 


y© n up 

- M 

Fragts. 

y - - 

- MM 

yes 

? N - 

- pl 

yes 

y - - 

M . . 

- ME 

Iko. 

y 

No - - 


. 

NON E 


%3;i24*22. 

y N E 

cWF/ - M 

FragtS 

y - . 

- - 

Frag l3 

NON - 

tA - IT 

Fr. 2 '(Lick 

- N - 

- M 

F i**y*ISid 

NoW 

2A - 

No Pace 

N E 

rrV M 

No 


- y 

90 x 30 

y N w 

-5T/ 1 M 

66xl«lx1 

N W 


64x32x? 

N E 

Extd. no Nt 

- 

N E 

£4d y F 

no 

N E 

i=c-nu m 

no 

N E 

j&JL M\ 

no 

No N E 

€xUl y Ml 

«0xZ5x1 

y - - 

No N E 

CshU - rr 

_ 

No N E 

(vj 

- 

No N E 

•sfesTV Ml 

. - 


55-55-170 55-90 80 
l Traces 60 60-200 25 %5 35 25 85 
Trace. S 50-%5- 7 5 - ~“ 

Traces 50 85-200 45 50 - 85 45- 25- 
7Zx ><|x 14 45- %5- 3l(0 30- 40 - 85 3o 40 
prcugts. 40 - 80 - 8 t> 24-18-70 


S 

35 wE 

85 EW 
85 WE 

w 


10-25 


II 36 


N E -z-k. 
N OntacK 
N E -3d. 

M 0 nlctcK 

N E 1,11-4. 


N 

E 

£xld. 

y 

y N 

N 

E 

E- 

Exfd 

»u> 

no 

N 

P 

ExH- 

no 

N 

w 

ExCd. 

no 

N 

E 

Extd 

no 

N 

ub 

Extd. 

no 

N 

4 

Exfd 

y 


6 ox-- 3 onisy?| 

No 


Traces 1 
No 

? 


no M 1 races 


N E 4-X 
N 1 On tod 


N 

N On! 


FIT 70*22*' 

M _No 
XT Traces 
SiX 

ues 

Nl No 


35 - 70-210 

45 -- 104 - 1 %% 
55-120-ISO 

60 120 - ,60 
40 Eto- ISO 
65- 95- 180 
50 80 -120 
25- %0- 140 

35- %o 180 
40 105 -195 
42 - 42 - 175 

95- 5S-180 
55-140 -200 

- - 75 

35- 80110 

40 85 20 
40-ST -200 
50 - 50-190 

50-120 200 

60-100 85 
24 - 74-150 
24-72. 170 
5o- 40-130 
30- 40 - 4? 
30 70 20 

36- 9ot O 
30-9075 
75 "- 4 o- 3 o 
65 - 1 ) 0-120 
55-120-115 
35- 80 - 80 

35-85400 
30-75-105 
35- 90-45 
40 - 100-70 

39- 105-220 
3o 32 .- 70 
30- 80-40 
3 o- 85- loo 
35- %0 90 
50 105-120 

40 - 90 - no 
40 95-200 
4STIS-l6o 
45 80 80 
40 - 70-120 
4o-loOl6o 
35- IIS’-125 
50-120-50 


68 99 • /OO 

2 I4T5-27-2.9-4Z-49 58-63-70-71 /o5 ] 

31 33 34 SO 51- 64-66 i 


3^45.104 
28-45-120 28 4-0 
40 - 50-120 
30 80 110 
4o • 55 95 


40 45 120 
35-40-105 
35-75 45 
37-80-30 
45- 55- 120 


30-25-80 

40-55 8 / 

45-4ot20 
35 35 85 
26-24-74 
’ 36 -72 
35-4o-75 


w 

120 ew 


39 

26 44 


GroapA-H Pu.'Xxyc.i 


6 - 8 - 9 * 23*28 


T 8 %4-85 105 


- H-®/ 


35-100 25 
40- 3o- 120 
40-25*80 


20 -15 75 


35-25-100 


45 ( 2 * 4 ) 

3.4 . 30-32,-41-47 76 

77 


S 4 100 103 
-joy 


3o ? 95 30 60 95 
40 40 <80 

35-75-95 35 40 35 
40-45-80 

55-40-110 55-40-110 

45-50-100 

40-45-115 


38o(M,ic.re9iarfers') 65 7 * r*i) 

36 air haod- 

39 

CM" head. 99 

34110-113-114115 

37-40.41 60*63 

ZiZ, • 35 

67-79 

87 , CU" head ; _ 

3 - 4 - 5 * 33*47 • 50 - 66-71 yjHy 

4- 7TZT4 45-54'59 80 IOO 

39 W , 77 99- i0 ° 

4 14 61 109 


HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. OLD KINGDOM AND FIRST INTERMEDIATE. 


N? STONE 

Pi-gSD 
_ - 


BEADS REMARKS 

Pu. xui* 

Fragfs of lolp of toooden. headrest. at head of W. 1 « male, body 
Pot at back of male . CU abasler under L • Hand of -female . 
6 ronxe mirror Pu jcEPT Ne l.^ Bone. P.’n PlTxW , M 2 2_ 

- - . FI int flakes . S|am.e Of sVxoU. -f-ish 

68 a (libber (ruriall Flint (lake . NE Comer . Alabaster N.W. Comer . Pot mid. t= Side. . 

— (Lower burialj 

_ - Headrest Pu VIII . NQ4- • P - ^hawler rotted. 

Am’-nruxl Bones. 


I CaLTved keadrtst PL. IX , NS? 7 gcfr. Flint. Flak«- . I see s ect. 8 7 

Side of Coffin wife;list of-offaringS, Pu. LXVl . __ .Names. I*T>< ^ THAU . PalimpsestP lLXV.I, 

- Wooden h-eadreer. Pu. VIH f N°4» Cof>[»e.r mirror Pu 

- — Childrens torrrb , J4t Sec-tl'orx 64 

Haad v-est Pu! 5 U 1 ., N9-7 . Cattle. Lorues . 

- Headrest Pl_ 1)111 , N? 8 . 

- - Flint knife. . Sandslont Palette. . 

63 n 68 v Headrest Pu Vffl , N° 5 . lye from car tonnage. . 

32.u> ~70m Sh.fe.ll Com(r. Sferro-tfed -flint. 

Sticks and sandals . CoffAn of MERERY . Pl Lxy , M6.3. Sect. 87 
Concfealed-mitre. _janrvl3 on IrottC Coffins-? 

- ToTtery Keadrest PL W), N’^S. 

- Inscribed headrest Pu NMU N9 6 Name tMYNeS TainTed wo od^ 

85\b ESn-anee -mirror. Pu XXI jJ NS 4 


j | *>W - 

181 - f 

185 - 

/8 6 - 
188 
189 
192 
193 

134 - 

' 

196 

197 - 

19s 

201 3, 4 ,5 ,6 
2o2, 

203 

204 

205 

2 06 

207 


Solid wood headrest,PuViTT*><>.» Sfee Pu LXV N9 4 (Box-Coffin eyes), also Pu OocW N2 1 Name tp>«4»M 

Headrest, Pu Mill ,N° 3. 

Blue Spangle beads Bronze mirror Pu t^llU 5 (ander heoxLj 

Pa^rw,s rrv a-ttlrtg . 

2k5allK28m 3of 38r44l54K f Fragmen-t of mirror alroVfe head . Mirror FL X£JiV N9 7 
57668 dgkn.y 70 s 73 cfKmn.ol amalets and beads Pu. jj,6 ©idton.Seat 

79 hl 80 a 8 ) 5 -f m jsvwy ( Body -OKlrnded <rvc ask. Cmfe. koard ; doalrtf*^ i{r (rel o-ngS 15 a Coffin 

- — 2 h>di es Cuttcnded 1 One Scrni-Conhracted. . _ 

68 a- - - _ ~ “ ” fflake 

5K-I5qi 7 n 38(,42 3 68jv73b4 74t Cy(,n-dex* bead Pu XX N*I ^Ud ofjro^ , Pu Tx ,NS 9 .Flint 
92 -r \ S5J SVierd u>\ttv Tu.de ^rvtajqrcu-y i on* J r , rL JKI|, Tv/? A*<? 

17 m 38dg58t68go73r80«85ay C|old Scarab-^: treads . Pu XHX LI^5 24a 58t 


680 73 r l^odv OTi . * 

- Z fx^yricS cunal&t CQJS«.S - M.^C, iWtrti-cAfid - 

38 rk 70 e 7 3 b^ww*- 85hjv 9&d IFragts of Keoudrest Se mirror . fntc of O^aiena. 

3 _ * - Alabasrer»c-stQn.e ^<ds Pl S 

Remains of SiX C off m i ,-not inscribed tratTKacTdA^ Vfeneer-ed . 
- - Sronee. -mirror Pu XXlil , 018 6 . 


TSO u- - 

79 <^ 85 t ! P06.NP 61 (2 of them) Ireside Sku-U. 











t l * COFFIN SHAFT', CHRMBER CHAMBER I 

u ft u <c 


E E4d - 2F2C (nd. 

E MM|F - - 
E Extd. - FT Tco-cteS 


e n e - - - 

y M E ^zX «0 14 No 
L N E Exlci - Ho rT Traces 
v N E E*+d. No ?? Traces 


N E U*-d y F 


«, N - Extd. No 
No N E Ext~d - 
No N E ExFd No 

- N E Onlxuck No 

- N E Extd No 
‘ S W ^^ y 


M No 
M No 
M No 


N E D 


Z5-<&0-%5 
35 9S \bO 
4o IOO 130 
4o- < 8ro-5 'O 
35-70 ISO 
4-5" 35' l6o 
Z5- #0 130 
35-115-210 
5o-952jc> 
46 " no.240 
35"- S>o - 14 S" 
35- I 10 l 60 
7S- ‘ 8-0 -30 
3O-50-8-5 
2.5-SO-50 
£5-80-65 
X.S 80-80 
30 80-70 
3o- 90 -12,5 
40-75-45 


50 -2,085 
353580 
35- 55- 90 

25 35 85 
40 75" 12.0 
35- SO- 85, 
40 35- IIS 
4o-35 75- 
35-45-120 
40-35-90 


h n E . C 

- W 
35-35 8 C WE 
3o-35 '-96 W!- : 

- E. 
W 

30-45-90 EW 
— W 
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40801 x 0 w.e 

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40- 25-80 
20-35-90 

40-36 TOO 


y N - - - 1 

- N E ExTd? - 

No N| £ **5=0: - 


No 

M No 
No 
No 
No 

14 No 

Nt No 
No 
No 
No 
No 

M Mo 
No 

mmf ?3 No 


No N £ Extd - M No 

- - - - - No 


26 85 -60 
2.4 «4 70 
75 - 85-60 

24 ?o-65 

8 Q - 6 o -35 
104 deej> 


NaN E No C Pottery 50-70-40 


P O T T El 

Pl. xyy-i - Pt- xxxn0 


Chamber-on-** : 3o" 60 ' 9 EI 67‘73‘ 79 

7i*77 


Under Imrial 2 iz) 

4^ 


34*38 


Sj-9o-97-io7-ir3iis 

7» 

72--7^ 


100 

99 


(GUr heajJ'/ty- 


( CUthtcudJido 


18 

15-»7 

One of T^>e B &roicj> 1X5. 

‘9 zo 


53- 55~ 


56 

43-5-7 


96 

92. 

5. 95 

96 

87-88 ■ $“Z -113 
92.-106 
39- M2. 

IIX-II3-115 

9\ 

94* 108 
9496 


95 

92. 

9VV m ‘ 

99-100 

. 113 

106 

7S- • -8-9 

9-6- 94-95-113Itt 


HARAQEH. TOMB REGISTERS. OLD KINGDOM AND FIRST INTERMEDIATE. 


STONE B EADS 

(ft. XLVl l (Pt-. XLIx ) 


R E M A R K S 


Stone- Noses f 4 _IJC, 1 . 

— — Only one. cUdds tody m . H<.<xdre&tT Wod Kmq sticK 

nEba-qlv sandstone ^granite biotta RtmainS of -4 todies % -males m W Apcidau j female in EL, 

- - G-olU Wealds Pt yXli NS4. 

- - - Fragt*. Headrest" st\oK-. 

6«*v 73Sa- FliVt.l--tlpL.KeS. 

68tv Sou. Ft iVtP ^Ha.K«. • . 


lo- ii-Kt 


73g79fp 

Qtaze disK beads. 

30 bj 


Slone, vo^ses . Pl 7XV . N°? » - __ 

Quarts, cvmuAa-lr ^1-n^ See. PI—. XIV NS 13 Fold knolr , Pu .XlV. N - 13 
GolU S^>V*attx bead. . 


- («5t42f ' .. 

S^iOml5Kn 17o38w44to68wi7Jt^t&0g G^rou.|» Pl XIV , tsfS 14- Scarat.oid P L. KX t N~&• 


Gold beads . Pt. , N24 

Ovigirvaily (jncK-unecL 

'Polrnark PlJEI , N« 32, . 


34fc|> 73lJ»4uv 


57 a Sc groic|=> T“l S, N?-4- /Huiton. SecJL. . IVory Kan.A. amulet . lions &X 


57c 68-y73ft fc S 2 _ 


Bicltinv 'S-eaJL G~ 

Scavair No4 ,PK°te 


G-roicb Pug N9P 
sIo. PlXi ^ 2 3 - 


GAa^-e b-eads, See Pl.X> N® 

See swi 

44f 68 <j- 


!62, F Mate Kead ^limesto-ne) ^laaie ^ot. TKre^.. 6-odies a,lmosl" 

Sect. 66 \ Com^ilert.l'y extended, lying Side Iry side . HosE Fa-sVerly IruJr . 

T one^P?^ Kad ItccmAs & mint Easterly tody (ft) Hiac e ^rg/ajEe., 


‘Painted- ft- inscribed- cKamberS ot~ H EK 1-3HRF - NE1KHT_ 


0-1— -art— A I A taJt _ ~t"X a 70 in Q9.tr 


rtUTVl-eCL » w'ua. v-iha. 1 ■'-v-ei j y t n u 1 M j »»«■<» " imi\n ■ __ 

&-lus wife tlKHT-HOTPE, Fi-^. DCvTt tc LXVIlj ■ PLoto.R.\|l,6 
J l sect, at tu 












gCOFriN SHAFT CHAMBER CHAMBER § 


A Mjnf 

AM- 
F - - 

M - 
A - - 

’ F FnM - 

> A - - 

' A - - 

A - - 

) F MM - 
F - - 

L A - - 

» A - - 

■f M ' 

► A MM - 

A - - 

A Ml - 

. F - - 

I ft M - 
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A - - 

I A FFM - 
A - - 

.A - - 

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; f - - 

F - - 

' A - - 

A FFF - 
A - - 

A MMF - I 
A F - 
A MF - 
A 6F4M - 
A MFM - 
A MFF - 
A FFMf - 
A MF - . 
AC - i 

fl F - 
A M - 
F - - 

A F - 
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A fff - 
A C - 
A F - 
A FMn- 
A MMF - 
ft araf - 
A - - 

A ,MC - 
A F . 


O v B H.T M , F. t>, H . N . £ 

- 76x23x21*$ SO -80-210 3S 38 95 

- Frost's. 80 lo 6 -tz>o — 

35- 8 ° 140 30-35-80 


H. N. E 


O T -T E" R 

( Pls. - xn ) 


S 

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E 3t 


35-90 (90 50-80-110 40-38-HO 6 N 2S 

50 90 180 70 -IOO 60 5 ; 

35 8 0 200 35-35 80 4038 85 NS - 
40 - 40 • 12-5 4o -75r-40 40-40 80 EW 
40 80 348 70 - 168-204 - s 

60120110 - ■ - 

50-60-120 45-40-85 - S 

55-90-110 5 ft 65-98 - s 

50 95-100 50 - 75 -MO - S 

50-100 -240 45-45 80 65 - 112-110 SS Om 
35 - 55-140 35 - 35-75 - 5 i 


38t4 a r4H 


58c 6 ?i 


57 j 67s 


7j3 

s 2*445.17jx 


60 - 25 --50 
35-90 -160 


55-80-110 


- Rogts 


Y Fvaqts 


40 80-170 40-54-95' 
50-S0-12S 

40-85-180 6 p 80-120 
70-95-330 56-70-95 

60-100-220 50-/20 /20 
40 - 00-210 ? 80-95 


SS Ons chr behind ofKtr 
5 5 d 7 ix 

N 

S 2d 
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S 3n 5d 
S 2fj3v5hh 3 lm 
S 5 d 


- 85-38 40 

- Fmgte 


- LPB-G-e 

- F'ra. qfs 

- Fro-oPs 

_ fftru-W 2 
dOrtS+SJ 


35 - 100 - 360 ( 45 ^ 5 - 55 ^ 48 ^ 40)5 3 w 5 d 61 * 1 *^ 

50 90 I80 l 6o-iio go 6 o?so*ii 5 J SN |, 

45 - 80 - 1 IO 55-80 95 - S 

50 - 80 -170 55 - 47-80 - IM 

36 - 94-160 54 - 75-95 5075-80 NS 

38-85-170 - - 

35 - 85-180 52 - 45 - A 5 52 • 38 - 90 NS 2 h 7j z 

27 - 80-225 55 - 27-/05 - S 5 f 

50 80-190 40*45-90 - s 5 d.tw 

P'T.n.of CEMY F 

40-90-170 55 54-95 - S Sbjwjjx* 

36- 95.310 50-90-95 Il-^o-noi N l 7 jxK 

50 - 80-250 3536 - 93 M70-120 /60 o 

50-80 -170 ^jMSo-icxy 45 ° 80 ^no sin if-j5l 
40 - 85-170 4 ft- 80 - 1|0 45-36-95 5N2eK5d 7j x 
So xo -180 5 o « 0 - 8 O 50 - 70 - 80 } S 5dxy 
30 60 -160 40-90 93 (46^ 5 I-857n NS 2fjU sdkx 7n [i 
36 75-140 40-36-80 ^ 9? •«*-»« / ' 


3 8 So. 

/4014133 67 c. 7or 

V 58 m 59“- 

38 o 58 h 67s 

41 f 67S 

46rn 56ir 58chj( 

40F 67S 

40y S7j 

67rs 

41 b 

41 j , 

41m 67 S 

|54v56Ui 3 58jtn672 
57j58^59hJ 
S6k57.i5 8h/,rn67v 


55-40 -80? N S 

55 - 90-1103 N S 

*W3fe ,6 ° s 

4580*110 SIN if* 


- 95 - - 85ml 


S 5Atw 
, S SWwJjx* 

1 N s 7jiKnu-z. 

0 S 

) SIN 2f*5l 

’ SN 2 eK 5d ~J' lx 

) S 5dxy 

<g NS S&ijSdHx 7 n IOW 


340 40-So-tzo 35-40-no S 


Crtrtch 

- 17 ^ 3^'40 

- tVactS 


33-80200 70 - 90-200 — 

70-90-210 SO-HO-UO ydh.wy 37 L ~ 4 lf 58 h 3 675 

60110-250 50 ^ 35-80 gOjBo- MO M Jr 7 j a . 36 k 4 jjm 53 r 67 o r y 

. S.cWa.-mbc< SK.R«m« Ks It. Child itiJocuImS, , 1 s- t 56 H, 58 rt 

35 - 90-200 60-60-120 4.,™ 

60 - 95-320 55 - 100-120 371 4If 67Sy 

45 - 100 - 3 I 01 oC 4 o 45 US lot 40-45 55 WE £ 10 , 3 l. 5 y /OF 56/1? 58 o* 

30-90-140 65-30-80 55 - 35-95 SN SWj. 7jzW 5 gTR 

32-95 150 55-60-120 - S 2 fj 3 m<j, 37h 50 j^ 6 d 67 ‘ 

35 - 85-320 unfinished - ini i£>* t 44^ * 

•? E T£‘ Le0 0 e 9 C«iPTiON,Sec .67 2 e z c 45 >w l 7 j a |Omw 38 ^ 41 ; 56hx62S 
32 - 85 -ISO 40 - 56-90 - s O-a-^sd^yJ^Om J 58 hat, 07s 

40-85 (60 4 ^- 40-100 - S 7 ' 42 c 3 67A 


^.cWo.'mbct SW.Rtm<w Ks' 

35-90-200 60 - 60-120 
60 95-320 55-/00-120 


Mu 


37x 49 d 

38o 3 4lK 

41j 

49 f> 67b 

57 wy 

38o 2 48f 57q .58ha59u.^ 
S4t 

67 K 

38ms Sbh 2 5T) S*^ 670 
4lH9dlv5 : 0757j 

48 f 59 t 4 67 S 
67S 

38 o 3 67S 

37L 41 f S6h } 6ys 

361* 4ljm 53r 67o r y ? 

4 «t 56K,58r-b j 


Za 3 ib5y IOf> 
S«i 7 jzK 

2 fx3m^ 1 

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1 z 

37 l 41 f 67 sy 

56//2.580/,t, 5~Qc 

5SK67S 9< 

37 h S ot56d 67 s 
t 44f * t?s 


Ffc^rs 


40-85 (60 45 - 40-100 - S 

7 g- 95 -^io 60-30 9c51 7o So-uo\ s 
50-95-180 5S V $c r ixQ 4l U 5f*MO©N$ 
45 - 80-170 60 -(05 (05 S 

50 - 85-170 so-32,'80 50-3o-8o Sin 
55-95-210 6 o 8S-U2 6l-ft4--UO NS 


5^V . 

5W X 7 j-l 
5w z 

gbxk’miY 


58Vwm 

67 s 

67 s 

57j68t 


3/1901, 

41 fj 56W 67 s N4mt‘.SENE6TlSl 


HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


| STONE 

D CPl. yuviA 


BEADS fe 

(PuS L-- Llll) 


10 c 36 jln 


63 ^ 64^084 
70»73fNtfa 

79 j Km 


79jkm 


R EM ARKS 


Name BAS TEX HEXtT P. on coff.tx /LlScaxl collar. 

Coffnrv h-oxt Fodltrn.:^^ Flack ou ^>ale blu.C 
Plaxtcr Ear £ fronts of cartonnaqe . Br.cks 14 x 7 x 3 
f G-la^C PL.]}gy,Neio.Blt*.e joask hiblw^otamus PL yjy 
l N- 12 .. pragfs Tough, limtsl'? bowl. PitCC ^YCtll Sandslj; 
praaghtsman Canojsic cht on E ; E tS, m 10 , H37. 

Bricks l 3 X 6 /uA 3 /a. 

•• 2 . 0 X 10 ^^- 

Fragt" oj li-mtstonE. Carv.opic jolV 

Small fragls cobbtr . Br.cks 13 x 64 . . 

FlirtF flakt BnckS 


41 

42. 

43 
,45 
46 

A1 C L ' 

lo-OS-coveroJ^ 

44 


(70x73c 80 - Small fragts cob| 3 Er. BrickS 13 x 6 % x .4 . 

(79j km 9) FlirtF flakt Bricks 

68 a . - 

63n65h68jj - • 

Frails woodtn. tAiand . sndt of hor- em-hh&. Pl 2 H 5 ' 
79 9 Bricks 14x7x3 

Mry N cKt ■RoagVv l itritsfc IrlocK cat ii’kt SarcotVi^eovcir 27^18x14 

73^79jKw 

, ~ .* ,7 l PL 5 J,5 

680 « Wooden Ca-nofMC. jar kend . Rxrt o)skit of k’ 5 NF S£NB 

Ri-nT flakt 

680 2 Icmcsfk. CartomzaaE Eyes . 2. pieces homslont. Sold -foil 

- Marble knolr(?). Bricks,/S^T^x 5 “ 

(SST Scarab of NVM1H PL 2X, N« 8 . Ivory dancma wand. 
73t79jk80tf 7 3 

4zc 68 z 70h79jHw 526 l cnscr. tYL.. SENOSERTl g. 4 scarabs,PL,}§ N°- s 9-ia 

pLiyyv.g; SFele of Renf sonb. Stele of NEB-PU sec PLXXiv.Ng g..• PL..E3gy 


, r - " . - |c«vtxo|)ic jars 

Fltyir rl&kt . Woodtn vox untti kumAn* ktarlcd. wooden 


6oa6i hk 


tlmvoi-kfed Scatab . Rngct-s o-f ivory dancing >/and. 
LimtsTons. h\|3(30^»olam.u.S (Univ Coll.) fpamfiil') 

<5°ld -foil. chamber 160 ins. from ground level. 


“ H * N» £ 

- LcrculnS on W of S hafl* 45 30 - ft^T 

179ikm l (r-lajt Ptah Sek-tr PLylV N°9.l vqTl| hands f of hcodrtsl 

70l<nO73liW74f > 924 <J-(ajt dog . 'PL.XiV N 58 ,'RoagH K’i{a^o|potaTrnuS. Fragfs 

63o68q. Inner rtetss. 35 deep . FUni* flake. 

63® 68 r - 


H- IN.B 


65 

66 

69 

70 

7« 

72. 35-53-54-72-73 

7^ 

00 

81 

8 a 

90 


63 068 a, Inner recess. 35 deep . FUnh flake. 

63® 68 r - 

, _ -v. - . Pols, lyj>csaa z n,ffdhwy have lohilt fims. H- ini B 

(FotrTv/urK Pl yn 630 6ftg "•* t * s oKcunlrtt 40 - 80 - 120 , Wlfk frtnch ba.SSa.gt lo shoXf So-3 ^-70 

ParF 6 ^ lyaoalijVle dish . Fragfe limtsfh.-fUUtd [a 11 lar 3 in «Jia # 

63t 68 g, iTgJtoii " ~ r jof nk in shaft" 

fe3^u.64g 08lu73}> 4 RirFof CaTfermagt tyt . 2 flml" flakes -InF aded banal 

%, , ~ “ - f Of l>itu.men 

63© 649 P 8 r- fyts from car tonnage. S hulls had Bye f>lugs . Pieces 

- J 85>^2n f . - - _ „ 

47i“ 7<?ht 73lr75f79jhm 6 -old yog|3,PL. Xxii. rM«5,qold leaf. See also PoC.m 

- - Smo.ll g/agt sFatU-elte Pl XIV JNS ll. 

680 .^ Sigh Flint" flake 

63f>68g79g Inner e-hamber had ytctSS for canopic lews on. e 

60o ST 6 ne‘breaker 0 

32V 8 bf oz7\ r/ ' 0L1f '^ kokl fjoF/lid. 


38 5y7g 44v 68n70^73Tn79ikm Scar-air and z cylinders. PL.yy ,INf9 22.fe9l; 6 onebittS. 

20 4 i-nscr canonic jars__ See octailed Description scrF 6ȣ-97 

For inS«A|»(iert See Pl LKyV NIC* 2 .Sc 3 . - 1 
















96A F 

94 A - 

$6 A - 

97 A FFF( 

98 A fT” 
|04 A MM 
10S{\ - 

106 A F 

107 A Mf 
106 A F 

109 A F 

110 A F 

111 A F 
MX A M 
H4 A F.F 
ns a (f 
iii 6 A aritf 
H7 A MF 
Its A 3M 
•19 A - 
120 A M 
22 A F 

124 A MF 
117 C F 
128 A 3F[F 1 
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130 A FRd 
31 A 3M,F 
132 A 2M3F 
03 A MF 

134 A ff 

135 A - 

136 A Mm 

138 A - 

139 A MFF 


E COFFIN 

& 

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V Fragts 
— 

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- FraglS 

- Frail's 

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Fttv^fe 


Ml A M 

Ms - 


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NO no 

lrax.cs 


I SHAFT 

N- E p 

4F-95-200 
45*9O-230 
31-80 140 
56-110-320 
40-8° 110 
45-85 ISO 
45- SO 1 80 
70-130-310 
40 110-324 

31- 95-I70 
<$0-100-180 
40 95-160 
36-100-320 

34 90-170 
40-110 ISO 
40 - 45 280 
40-95-180 
36-90-280 
38-92 160 
35-95-| 6 o 
35-105-340 

35 85 160 
35-90-140 
PLAN , 

40 35 -80 

34 90 310 
^ 0’€5 " 8 0 
45-fiO-llO 
45-70-170 
35-90-150 

32- 110-100 
55- SO -160 
40 - 80-92 

35 80 -iso 
£>5-110310 

34 9o 170 
31- 80-180 
45 95165 
32 80 140 
42-105-080 
40- IIO 240 
37 84-155 
37*92* 170 
38-95 180 

45-90-AlO 

35 90 110 

65 1X0 330 
45"- 100-240 


GHANBFR CHAMBER 0 

Kl 


P O T T 

(Pls yxx iv - 

55*40-105 — S 5w r d 8 m 

- — 7jiTL 3 

40 - 80/00 — S 7 j*.' ,m 2 iOF 

75100-120 - S 2n 36-rtt* 4l 

55--85 no - N 

5o-42 95 S 5y 7jV IO|» 

50-42*95 55-48-100 NS 5y 8 m 
75*1X0-155 S 4 

£?S5m6o 4o-4«mqo N 

‘40 3^*90 45 * 80 ^ e% sn 7nx 4 

40-75100 - S 5dw6l>7j x 41 

55 80 80 80 27120 NS 7Ja?«n« (dads) 

Sit (plan PL S 4 

60 -34-150 - S 5y 7ja. lOb 

80 80 /60 - S ' 41 

44 80 95 $5-75- izo NS 5y 7jx 41 

50-80-115 43 92-95 SN 5w x |Od* 

130-UO -60 - S 5y 7jan,8m 41 

55-65HO S 

47 80 95 47 60 -80 SN 7j x K , 41 

50 45-110 - S 3f>5w* 7jx 

60 00 -115 - S 2a* 7 j z |Ow 4 

45-35-80 $5-110 no SN 7 j x 

FL.xin; AND SEC. 69 ,. 5v^y7ja. 4 

40 85 X5 loculus-on W fVoU4U^3E[dyn 

sec section 7 o.. af x f 3 5 w x y 7 j,im x 
40 65-90 58-75 /05 NS 5dy J 2Qe37L 

50-100-110 45-80 100 SN 38<t 4 

50 90-40 - e 5y7n x 4 

4 o- 90 - 9 o 50-90 -90 NS 

75-SO (00 75-90 80 SN If 3 5dw^7-7j a 33t 4 

4580120 - s 7w 


36-Ttt! 4if46m 67 ES 

67S 9°P 

56h x 675 

5Bt59y 3 67s 

40 CL. 

49u 67S 

41 k49j S6 s58(i67S 
67 c s 90 s 

4lj 67 s 

67 s 90 s 

4 lm(j>T»gKt" red) 673 
4lj49u58r x 67 s 

58y t 67 s 90 s 
41-mK 67 S 

67 s 

4 lK 

67 ey 

41 K 67 es 

67 es 70 u + 

41 m S6&1 SenlL 
r« 67s 

58 »-h 67s68f 9 ox 
56h x 

44 W- 67 s 

41-m49l 9 osvx 


7ji IOf> 
8 m 


. 7na. 

5dv*p£> 7ji 

7Jx(onc 


ERY 

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56 d x 


7Jx(ont black) 

7ja IO|> 

7jx * 

lOd* 


7ji low 
7jx 


45-45-SO - S 

75-95-(20 55-50-H0 $N 

35-90 »oo $ 

50*40 90 50-50-90 NS 

60 so -105 60 70 105 . s,se 
40 4*5 85 S 

55 -80 HO 55 82 104 SN 
? 80-91 65 /00- ? NS 
41-37100 - S 

65 95-130 - S 


Sy7*x 

5dw l xy-7j 1 33l 

7jx 

129, 

7j t |Om 
5y K 33m 

ib «>s r 

5y Xof 


673 90 3 
67 s 

6 ?S 

67 s 
6jet>s 
67S 9or 

67 CS ! 

6 xs 2 7 S 


ISen.1? 


110150 - 65 ] 8 

as- 35 85| AO- 35 IIO NS 
FALLEN 1 N(loculi) EW 
$09533 o| - S 
5F-80-120 j 40-45- IIO NS 


IN (loculi) £W (S*C O. K "Registers^ 

— S 2 m 

-045- IIO NS 38<y 41 j 


36J(wi IK. VJ' PL® n° 2 c >)67 4 
44-] 59 b*. 62 k 

41 k 59$s 


56h z 58c 3 r 


S ~ 60 65 -020 41-35 60 - S 

C c Tracts 60-5575 - - 

8 nr fr voKitS jparnBi 35*- 60-160 43 - 80-60 4 - 5 - 80-95 NS 3 a 
8 M y. inset*. ^ra^ls 40-80-170 40 35 -^S S If, 


Sy 7ji 

7Jx 


38 S x 


R7 6 M 

W8B f y 

50 S M y kstvibeJ 
Zsi 8 M FVagts- 

M m No 
tSSB MN1 


40 SO-IIO 

45-95* /60 55-35 95 
40 - 65-110 50 - 40-75 

35-80 -150 40-35-80 

16 - 70 - 75 

33 90 140 40 - 33-90 


s a^sy x 
s 


Jn uihifi rim 


HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


£ STONE 

z (Fl-EESS) 

93£^c°jU' 

94 - 

95 - 

96 

97 

98 - 
104 

10 s 

106 - 

/07 - 

106 
/ 09 
UO 

111 XX 

la 16-76 

114 - 

115 - 

116 

117 - 

118 

119 - 

120 

( 1904 . 3 ^ 51 

i24r5«-fcs : 


B EADS 

(Pi_S L - L»0 

68 ^ T 


R E M A R K S 


! pod tut. t- e . 


— — — — - — - l5co-vvxtal .(VW.J 4t«iuM/td nuxtl Col|>S 

520 73 1 [gold It af ;Ends •p©''" Ircoud coUclt Trrxcvdt IxWt VlCcudt Intaxis J Pl XVII ; 2 

- — — — — 0T»ckS 16x8*5. 

64t6So <Xo\d leaf. Mu-d foist doot* m E.of S ch.f 

C-iecC. 94 ) 60a_ 6 1 £ 684 , Srclo-ojKeNEi^su. PL .L^Xiv 3. Bricks 18 x 9 xCf. I 60 x 40 x 40 

684 , - 79jkm Qold foil. Uf>f>tv roorrv aT Xio dc^lfv . Lower Vu»js trtnch 

** - - — — Resin. FvcuaF alujE WoV. Plain qold mounT? ar. fclsb 

6 ie , B+ides 13 x^tx4- r ll§ 2 £^ 

52-A 649 68cl Traces of Oo^cv - £- gold leaf . 

32y 5”8d 6oa6lc63v 68lij<j,u.70o Clio{>f>tcl straw in ?i1liri0. plaits of kaiv-oTL sKall- 


Fisk HbpK , i^li-nlS ; wo^g f>»n . 9'°^* . do-uHt sc.ay-oJr-JiC t sxx. PL jCIV l\|5 | 

~ - - - Nile ©ysttv- sKtU. . ; 

- - - - Pop lod Kas verJ~icaJl bnown slri^s on. iP. fflakts 

68 0 u 3 scaro.bS | Pl XX , 67-69 ; Cof>|rtr fronts . Clay seals .TlmT 

654681 4 - urooden uskabtLixl. umeslT Iniat for- sWtict PL C50V 4 

63o 64 -jl 68 o<^ One of poFs 7ix t«n"!1r> IrlacK r-im . 'Tv.of uredd ovcrlal'ot 

- - - Qold foil. |wi/lx cop iptr 

69^1 . — — 

, , 68 (> # 1 79 jHm IjVntsfn.cyt fvom ttLV*fonnagt."THnck in Nchr 110-45 10 

5u-36k38i‘-44WF5dc6ffd.73acm i nn 1 ex Sleleof it-ne-haB*, Pl.XVI ns 2 Sc PL. LXkm -. s«cC.69&93 
SBh Ss^W 1 -peWlts . Probably un/oucktd.Heaxl N,-facc 5 * 3 ^ 

Recess iV» s ckT t>'a-s fered wVule urith Hutjrtv-Fical stnbiUL 
_ _ _ _ 1 _ uuiKrwsTrifprs uf>cofm4s 

681 - - - ,2 

5Xa 68 b 6-ol4 leaf. 

63 c 680 85x 1 U.sha.btnc - C(a^ ta/ls .'T3 SlH '"o f Sfc.lt of fl^enT Senb 

Wooden. h«a.d. of caru>f>ic jar. [ins'cr. Sherd ftX\\ N°?,r 

58x6f Flmt kvxJiye-, Pl VII , INI ~ 8 - Mo grtuie ( lrut bolte^y dumb. 

’Roccnd ibb 6 ltlt-,fL .)(XlV . 3 Jin fillirva: qraub doulttul) 

68 j 7>K79d gold leaf.' -' ^ 3 ^ ,_ J. 

$54 681 744 Chxu-coaL (m 9 oV),FTaJt:Tmxd cai> 5 . jPi-Lxx", ! 

(Sect. 94 .,) 80e SFelaaf KeNEMSufrSERi/KET, PL Xvl , 1 . Paj-C of SFelt of NEB PU ; l 

79 fs One ck? s.e. cotntr- of skaff. Blk Qi-aaile stetlceltt;lix/X 4 

, 70v79jkm - 

63t64l68o J - - 

32nt 47Y 79jkm Go 14 skells g~o.-rvxu2e.tl. Pl "XxU Ns a. 

643 6 «o Shaft. bla.stfiFecl . ‘ _ ■ ■ ' 

6^0 gold leaf . FlinF Halet. _ )MogUr fr child.. Pl Xx 9 .i\ttisli 

60 a, 6 bk L»Tn.tSlont TiAVLTfc ^Irowl .PLX1X.3. ^IK.^VanilT.dyacJ of 

6 oa. 6 ih.k 680 Unfimsked slajtuettes .'TVun.br of Umeslfe.fTAH 

- “ — Bricks l 6 *xs x 6 /y 


135 

136 

138 

139 17 ^ 

I4« * 

141 78-eo 


(Sect. 94 .,) 


$ 8 p 
68 b 
lt50c< 


681 

5Xa68b 

$3 168 b 

58x68k 

68 j 7>K79d 
$54 681 740 


32T>t47r 


79H . 

70v79jkni 

63 t 64 l 68 o J 

79jkm 
»4q 6 «o 
63b 

60 a, bbh. 
6 oa. 6 lh.k 680 


58f 63f 68 o(> Beads |>ossibly in5uded burial. 

73j79jkm Jewellery, Sect. 7 /j see Pl XIV Ns 5. 

Ijr lOh36h 41 j 68f» 70k-75b79jkm ^as) 

3Shn^47rv 73 P jp 3 v 5 N K ’ 

fe 8 oj> ™ «. _ 

* 9 d 79b_ _ Pottery Human figures (ef fomb 111 ). Scar-air Pl XX.NS70. 

5b 38S 4*1 f4 2 a -680 (Scarab, l\.XX,50. Co|rf>er (pin Dom friuF frei g? CI olh.hg in /r aSke-t^/bfa of Shbk 

- Marrxe : AtviUPEN ort coffi'n PL U(Xy,/V9 1 

8oef Bone ckjse.1 

— - - Pla-'i/s of hair _ 

Canonic box «rv Ioc-l4ia.s on W. (3oE.x 15N^ For Coffin see. PL. LXX . jb Sect 85, 

— — - 5ca.ra.6j ftSS|S/p56. 

Scarab, Pl ^ rvo 55. 









CC 

111 

(D 

>- 

a: 

UJ 

k 

X 

U> 

Z 

X 

E 

0 

Li 

£ 

Li 

y 

CO 

0 

J 

z 

U 


u 


CHAMBER CHAMBER § 

63 


Traces 

"Traces 

Sticks 


Traces 

1 


Traces 


Traces 


FVa<jIS 


Runted 


1 N -E. D. 


4o-6o 140 
2.5 bO ■ no 

SO- 90 ■ 130 
4-0 80 160 
45-35" -no 
4o- 30 • 220 
35 - 6o- 85 

35 80 -190 
4 o- 8 o - 2 Jbo 

40- 80 -165 
40 90 160 

36 V 5 - ISO 


H- N- 


40-4.0 

3525 - 
50-90 
6 0-100- 
6a- 55 - 
50 - 40 ' 
35 - 35 - 
4 - 5 - 25 - 
45 - HO- 

35 - 90 - 
40 - 45 - 
60 S 4 -- 


EL 1 H - N 


•80 


P OTTERY 

(Pls. xx*m - xu ) 


- - **-i5y 

80 60 - 75 - IOO NS 

/OO - S 

86 - S No 

140 - 3 

•80 - S iK 

5 >S - S 

70 45-80-no ES 
110 - s 


S 71 **. 38 o 

- 2 a, 5 y 10 m Seccthjtn S 

NS 38 n*t 

S 7 n*. 38 tc 

S No jittery , dale. uncertcui-v 
3 7ji 41m 58t59a* 

S iK 7 j» 38 o* 

S 56 d 58 ct 


S&cejhjin 59c bje. 88h 

67 S 


70 - s 

50 40-40-90 SN 
HO 55-55 12.0 NS 


XS 50- 60 - - I2f 49S 28 (P-K-T«9' s f eT s) 

40 100-150 40- 75-80 50-75-90 NS 7^310m 49a. 670 7093 

40 - 58 -180 4 - 0-36 -80 S 2f(u*’ifK charcoat) 38 <v 

50 83-200 40-100-80 45 - 85-95 (T5 7 j* 380 67s 503 

35 65-180 55 -90 S 38 g 57J 67s 

40 90450 30-40-40 60-65-90 NS 67s 

3 X-90 160 35-28 • 45 - S 5 y 7 j*. 57 j 

40-90-110 40 1 X 5 - 9 © WE 2 -$j. 58 y* 67b 

30 90-110 4 o- 4 fc «5 - S 2 ft. 5 lxy 4 ^|xy ; 

32 «o- no 40-32-^0 - 9 5 V/*. 38 s 57 j 58 c 3 

4 o-^o 130 

40-100-155 4 ? HO 100 - S 7 n t 104 53 fb 67s 88y5<W 

45 - 95 1S0 70- 90- 96 50 85 /00 NS 996s 

32-65 -165 58 -30 -95 - S 33 t 38 * 2 . 

40-95 -240 4 O -36 /50 - S 2 f 3 7K.ll*. 57 j 58 c*rr, 

36-60-165 30 - 36-86 - S - -- - — StitTF 

40-160-/30 45-4o ioo 6 o> 100-88 5k 7 n*n 3 s 67 s 

4 o -80 160 40 70-85 45 ’- 75-80 NS 6k 7 kl* 53 i. 67 s70mAo* 

45- 60 /80 45-45-80 - S 57 j 67 s 

40 100160 60 -/OO-85 - E 5y 7 j 3 IOm 42l 580 ^ 3 S9«*>. 67 s ^ 

40 9014c 45 60-75 62- loo-Uo NS 2 a 3 3 lr 5 x 7H»*i3 10dm 53j>S7j 675703^*90! ftwlT 

431001704043-70 - S 5 y Z t «|g 53 a. 58 «vr 5 57 l 59 e a _ 

25-60-170 40-7070 s 7i*. 41k 57 j 676s 

25 45 90 - 58 V 67s 


7 t*.n 3 l 6 m 43 u. 


aft. 5-Lxy 
5*1*. 


Tii 

38 o 



38 g 

5 7 S 

Tji 


* 7 } 

58 y* 

44 xy 


38 s 

57 j 58 c 3 


104 

53 ff 


33 t 38 Si 

7h.lt. 

V . ., 

57 j 58 c 3 rr 3 


670 7093 

67s 503 

67s 


7 n*n. 3 S 

6k 7kl»* 


67s 

67s JOmgOx 
67s 


43- 100 I70 40-43-70 
25-60 -170 90 - 70 - 7 © 

25 45 90 


Traces 
Traces. 


36 100-100 
40 - 85 I60 
35 60 240 
30 -60 (05 
35 - 65 220 
4 o- 85 -160 
4 - 3 -loo-160 
35 82 , 250 


4o 9o-l55 
36- 94 20 O 
60-85-90 
35-75-i6o 

35- 85- 190 
34-5,0-190 
3o- 70 19 ° 

36 - 80-150 
I 347 IBIPCI Pamfd4m.SC. 25• 80 80 



45 - 80-95 65- 
70 50 -110 
50 30 90 
5 o -35100 
40 -40 80 40 
45 - 90-30 45 
35 ?5 85 35 
90 80 80 40 

35 - 45 - 80 

40-36-105 
60 35 85 

So 70-95 

30 - 55-80 

70- 86-100 
5 o- 80- 85 5 o- 


6 7e , ( 90 J 


SO-90 n| 2 a 3 Sw*y 7n iOw38f 48e,44« 56li57j58h i 67«K< 

S 5x 7is 13-S 40r 98 


S 2 ft* 5 x 7 jj. I 2 S 40 r 

S 2 f 

S 2f v 41k 

33 80 nm sr 65-90- 96) 381 58 z 

145.105 sw $b 33 s 3 «s* 

35 - 80 nn f 5 w*xy 6k 41 K 596 

64-goSS^ yj* 49SZ.58K. 


S 33 u 

S 5 x ?j 3 

S 5x 7 mt JLof- 

s 2ft. 7ji 
s 

N 

95 95 NS 7i,t> 


SBgw 

98 c 

675 

67s 90 s 

67 s 90s 

67ns £>80^ 
67s 


58c 3 

67 s 



67 s 

30 s 

67 s 

30 V 



HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


LX. 


N? STONE 

(Pc xlvii') 


B EAD S 


13-14 18 


R ENARKS 


(pis■ L-LUl)_ 


79 jktn 9 °***- 

— — P&tt&ry cLu.m.|3. 3 brooden mo-ltefs. 

42fj 68r73 <(i Bocf 6 SKutlS from S. Ckamfrer,3 from (\l.; Braided hair • mocttT’ng" 

See Frordi^biett, PlXW\ 8 sect 55. 2 Wooden KB figures. I raale. a.rx«t 3 ^CmaJe- todies- 
r See. Sfect. 73 • 

11^ 44m 63 m 6 eo 73 a x - Fragmertfs aj ^xx.£>yru,S. 


7 t 38 x 73 j Boe.f Pragmejx/s of faa-p-y-rus . Canonic toy ,S.E comer,Z2x/6x 10. 

“n^rPimitj a u°- Ta i s i ' P 4 ® r, >. N * 34 r I‘ x s!l 7 0 ^ 

—~ l a - T1 - € ^ Ad.^uJi C^nrvdr»cc 3 Lt <Xnxu.lf.r*.- Sfon*. Vacs-C-S, Pu VOcV fO- 

Kfl flmu/ef, R.ffiNs 75 . 

- - Fragts of cylindrical a.mud-eF(cf. Pi-3i\fN < ?2 > ) 

6l t L Ramie a keout of Co -rtojp ic- .(olt . Inscr. uioodrn. LroX Qold -foil . 

- v Wooden, dagger Pu xVlt • 3 Wood Tigu-re. -fta.tKer. 

gold -foil ( (nScr. wooden tox Wood. i-*njplcmen.\r Pi xVTl N ?4 

5 Sd Fl.'nir -flakaS. 

- - See alao N.K.. *vcgo»fers for i-n.tvu.dad Gurial . 

- — — Piaslcr tows. S.C Wa*rxter 

63 jp 6s'd64j68of. Inner S. cka.im.lrer; 4S’k;3k J 4S' 4 £Te. . Canonic ekesh S.E. 

- — Ammal (rones , OX or Sim, HnuE oj tody N.;aJHfuU linjltE. 

Sco.ra.tr PL 2 S NS 93 . 

also XVHl mliuded turial 2 j»ots coilfc lii.era.hc inscriptions. Pi 

- —■■■>. Ear of 1 Jblaster mask. 

- 7 - - 2 /Sco.ralrS Pu M , N 2*36 Flint - Flakes.. 

_ rnr . m — 1 ^* Q2t I _ » 

•1' - F6reign.y«>l% Pi 2^ N- 12.. _ 

- - - Wooden. KA figure. wi/K ouC wig ; face Iradly preserved.. . 

- - Bronje. Pfo gm enls . _ ^ 

I 0 e 34 n >446 738^.75r C G-otd -fish. Two gold SbrinoS (?) I nscr. Cv|lg. Pi N? s 26 

l Scaralr. Pi XX N 9 2 > 7 - G-rouf* ■ P*- XIM NS .3 . 1 *^ 

33 n —y ( gold Shell. Fragts of wooden ORO . < 3 old and 9 /u.avl '3 

9 308-1 Cylindrical amulets on copjptr wire. Pi XIV N 9 3 .Scar<xt 
- - ( of SEMNL) ; Pl 2 S 2 S > N 9 35 . Canajjic tecess in S cWJ l 6 xiRx 2 o 

32 .kitn 4 lljS 8 u. 73 a 79 jkm 3 ©tdSh.tll- t. orv E . 

194 26 m 32 t 6 $K 73 j , 79 jhm 80 j 8 st Co|>j>tT Adze-. Qold shell ■ Inscr. Cy\. Anveatmkd. 1 . - HT PL^C* 30 . 

r~ r -t ~ . ” .. ” _ ~ “ ~ 

O* j 68 © Limeslo-n-C. aye.Wwn Coffin . Ktonji drum S.clrv» ^OE^N, 

ll tf 5 gjSXl 9 r 24 l 44 f£y 63 d 70 x 73 gh. 92 t PLXXir.N °4 

L (n» 3 ZZ) 79 j km 80 j 85 l __ 

- - - Flint flake.. Woo etc-n. Kft j-igu-rc, Pl XVI N ? ). 

68 fw Fraqts ivory dcLncino toands shabed LEhe _ K<xr>.cLs . 9 tcon.a c-k^on 

750 79 jkm Foreign. 6©rs Pi . 2 S , N®S 8 ^ 9 - j S = fe 5 *< 6 Sx 90 

- - _ Foreign jsot Pu.^t , N? Tl. 

- - Coj=4»er fragrs . 

- - - Gha.rn.ter o-n S. of S. chamber,, H. sy. E 90 N40. 


73 «^ 75 r 


I0e34n>44e 


32.kifcn4lljS8u.73a 79jkm 


S- 65 x 65 x 90 


f m, G 32b44n 68qo 70 fr ~Jtet ZQ9 Cobber lu/eegers . Qold shell. . EUdrum irJcu-d cylinder 

L ' ) r 79 gjkm 1<3 l arrludet PiXTv N 9 4.4 Sca.r<xts pL XX N 2 S 6 o-fo;"noe» 

. _ . _ ( ^ _*_.. Canobic recesses on E of lower S. Ckenvbir. One on S of u 


Canobic recesses on E of 

Pottery offering "table,. 


^ \CKamrber 

if L-^he-r S 


63 k 68 u 74 j 85 1 
63 j> 64j 68 


8 rough, scarodrs & amulet Pu. XX N 2 ? 83-85 
FCinT -ploJrej Uroo den. ege -fwm O.offi-n . 

Frag Is cm a -felsb- Cylinder cxmulettcf. N/ c 3o^) 

Smai| gold Shell . mart of kohl Shch . 

iCVulds, body m cxcLuJ-ts Coffin. Pl. LXlX 

























£ f | 

NS fc £ I COFFIN SHAFT CHAMBER CHAMBER ? 

E * 3 | 

__U_U. L.5..D.T. ME. J) H . N E H M E Q 

348 6 MF ' - Jo So 170 40- 3o 95" - N 

34-9 S - - 40 - 90 - 160 -5o « 5-95 65 80 -80 ns 

352 B CC FrogEs 4-5- 95 - 2.10 42. 100 9 s - S 

353 B - - 4 ? W O . 24 O 55- 30-80 - S 


POTTERY 

(PlS . XxXIV - gl] ) 

6k 4«vn 58 k,. 55 U 

Sd lOm 38ost45f 53f 
2f4 5 -f 7jj. 4lkm 

2-«W».C. |n t w 


354 

B 

c 

H 

356 

0 

TllZf 

357 

8 

M 

358 

B 

-■ 

359 

8 

F 

360 

B 

ff.HH 

36l 

S 

M 

362 

B 

- . 

364 

8 


365 

S 


366 

S 

M 

369 

c 

- 

370 

E 


371 

e 

M 

372 

B 

- 

373 

B 

FC 

374 

S 

- 

375 

- 


37b 

E 

- 

377 

B 

- 

378 

e 

Pt 

379 

& 

*>riM 

F 

380 

B 

- 

381 

B 

hM 

382 

S 

- ' 

3*3 

B 

> 

384 

0 


385 

B 

NMF 

386 

0 

- 

387 

- 

fm 

388 

E 


3*9 

S 

M 

390 

E 

■ 

tf 

391 

S 

MC 

394 

E 


395 

S 

IMF 

396 

s 

- 

397 

0 

- 

39F 

0 

3M 

399 

B 

2F3T 

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501 

- 

- 

515 

W| 


519] 

VII 

- 

520 

Wl| 

- 

6 

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5Xl 

Wl 

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52.X 

Ml 

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52-4 

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5X5 

Wl 

. 

5x6 

Wl 


5X7 

Wl 


52« 

Wl 


5X9 

w> 



Fmgft 


W<*S l<VJ£C 

not.inscr. 


Fvagts. 

Quids 


35- 80- i«x> 

45 80 •200 

39 • 95- ZOO 
30-55-110 
30-80 -160 
45 80 230 
4o-95 230 

26 - 60-140 
38-95 160 

36- 88-165 
36 80 180 
45 80 220 

37- 63 185 
48 105-260 

40 90-200 

35- 80-220 
45 85-155 
40-85 240 
45-100 160 
35;- 80 • 120 
43 60 185 
50 95 axo 
45 - 60.170 

40 - 50-160 

36 80-2X0 

35 - 60-200 
65 - 3t • 155 

4595440 

3o-6o• 85 
40 85 • izo 
So- 120 -xoo 
25- 6 5- 35 
50-75-Z40 

36- 80-155 
45 - 76-240 

35- 95-250 
40 - 80 - 160 
4.8- 80 - 145 
40 - 6 o- 17 $ 

36- 8o 210 


4o-ioo 80 

Timer 

55 80- HO 
50-65-100 
45 2 . 5 -ICS 
35- 35- 75 

45- 70 80 
45 - 8 o 115 
30-58 70 
40 38-95 
45 70-80 
4o 85-150 
S<e Wan 
55 37 95 
40 65 -110 

55 - 75 110 

70 70 - lo5 
60-90-90 
45 75 «5 
55-100,55 

46- 35 80 
48 40 9O 
55-7S-110 
4-0-36 65 
40- 56 loo 
32-75- 80 
50-3535 

39- 6*-31 
60 - 80-130 

40- 15 85 
50/40/00 
45- 75-190 

83 85 140 

35-27- 75 
55-48 120 

37- 80-80 
55-83-75 

38- 35- 80 
45- 30-100 
50- 95 35 


4.0 75-IOO NS) 

40-MT-75 s J 33 “ C «7» >•* 

S 5wy 7ja lOf 56K X 67 s 

S 7i% 41 k 67 s 

S 33h.j38o 5 

~ S 2 f 3 57i58cr 67 s 

Go SO 120 NS jn loir 675 

S 59U 67 oS 

E. 7 k 49 s 

- 5 7 k 380^41 Tn 

35 80 60 SN 2f 3 7L,ji 38o^. 57j 675 70r 

S 7jx 33«*-36t 381 54 u. 67 s cpn 

fVKiT N°3 S 5y6 lr 53c56k z 58r 67sz. 

S 7jt 4lm 54 Hn 

- s Ze* 5y 7jx 4 tm 49 V 56157<58c 3 67 

S 5y 7jx*'z 10 9 ,2 *> 43 tu. 67 s ^Ovs 

38 90 -85 SN 2ol s 7j, 49 u. 67 s 90 s 


45 - 40-90 NS 
s 
s 


45 ,3 -55 NS Zcl*. 

S 3f 


7j Z 

49u. 

67 s 90 s 

Jifii.3x 7k 

/Og 

67 s 


38oj.Se 

57j 



S4w58fi6 67n x <?3 tw 


35t 41 j 

67 s 

2 . 0 . 3 k 5ww x xy 


561 57j 58 b 2 

^-fs^y 7 nn 

lOm 4 <k 

67 s 

7ja 

4lk 

67 s 

7jx 


58k 5 67 s 


33sl36l 

7 oh 3 

SWi 


57j58r 67 s 

7jx 

3So x z- 


Sy 7 jx < ^ w, IOm 

56d 59 tt 3 67 s 

W 5w,y 

35 s 

57j 

Za x 6 a 


67 s 

3f 5L 

48 fh 

59U 3 

7Lj x 

38o x t 

56k3 58c 3 67 s 


l tacuj^uf 


S ^-o-j3cfSrUiyj 


4lf44c 58r 5 X2. 

594-479 




25-15- 25 S .E Zo-i 5wy 7 ^ 361 4©l 56(r57j 5963 


S 5y 56 kj. 57059 siz 67 a.Cjb 

s 7j»j3 39 9 4iw *7j 

S 2f v 5y 7it 9 mT 0 k. 33 s 45 A S7jS'8t 5973 67 s 

4o- 35- 85 NS Za^. 41 k49^ 57 j 

S ' 67 s 

35-78 - 85 NS - - - — - 


67 s |$a 


HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


NS STONE BEADS REMARKS 

(Pt-S-L-U Mi) 

~~ 64^680 PrbFama-c Coffin above‘ I ■ " " " ** 

349 - Oafe Douiiffu.t 41342 b 684 Coffer pin. XVltl^hkaded. burial 68a. (taSaUt) broWtW Aeus.d 

5SZ -- - - G-otd banded, cylinder a.-mu_l et. 

3 ^ 3 “ “ “ Tremck 30 fond«. A-Zdeef iWui* S. C-Wa-mb-CY , 15 m --Pvow. W iira.lL 

* 79 j'*’ Pr » < Ctww^c Vet ess XX* 22 x 25d*«f> on E 0 $ Wi - Qla.xe caw <x~edl 

•• (fvo 9 Pl.^,N?*6fc7. Koki stick Cye of eccrrtn-n.io^ . 

354 I6-2-7-28 qrou^ Skcwn FLXXH N2 i . Sca-voir Pt Si N< 33 . Cyl.Vultr aTnvJeP S^LraAlw for«M.nJL 

" utiHl ^olcL Uiivo. j see section, 57 . 3 

356 - ! - ■'■«. _ _ _ __ 

35 7 - 63064368 ^ 2 . J^aiTvfed. i*-mest3ne. -eyes. A -va foj. seeimas -fo T 67 s bots 

358 - 6 Sr 751 FrajEs. cyii-ruler amuJet" c.|f. PL xiV iN? 1 

359 - I G>Qy 8 Ql» Ft ini' flake.. 

3^0 * .! ~ - N.K. <-n.tru.decl burial ("See NK reaistirs’^ 

361 81 - - _ v _ 3 _ ' 

362 - I" - _ _ _ _ 3 ~ 

364 ! - ^ _ _ v .. _ : ~ 

^65 - 680 79™ Coffm trench, in KJ ckaWitr 55x27* 25<l*«|i 

369 - - - See NK registers -for iWrutt-edL bu.n‘aX. 

^7® ' ~ ~ _ ~ - - — - - -. 

~H • “ 080 |75>jl<m Doov-ioojj lools In-icJeed ui» 42ock uitlL dressed oJt door 

3721 jjMpstir Infcd 42.^ 6 Q e^yJOu.'f3d(j - w _ _ 1 

373 1 41 v. Scarat- Pu g N 07 . ?koto , Pi.,% NS k . 

3?4 ^ ~ “ (% LocuJi 4 o h - 8 dn 3se on ei tk«r -side of S. Cko.m ber 

375 - - ~ - - - 

376 - - - Aii boVs, c««:et»t-58h. t Covered. - 

377 ' 63*n 680-649 Wooden Canobit jours. 

378 - - - Owl egg. 

379 58n 680 79jK»n Fraats Oold bloded -fish C.f PL..XN.NS 3 . xhrkiec a £w..J 


63064368 ^ Z {painted. limestone, eyes. A -v^ fodl seal.-nas -fo T 67 s bots 
6 «r 75L FragEs. cyiinder cumuietT C.-f. PL XIV |NS 2,. 

6 > 8 r 80l> Ft ini'flake.. 

N.K. intruded Uncial (See NK registirs 


680 79 m Coff in trench, in KJ chanvUeT ( 55x27x 25d«tf» 

- See NK registers -for m/rad-edl Uu.riaX. 

|? 9 jkm Doorioajj usols IntcJeed ub '"Rock mtU. dressed toJc door. 

6Qemy7 0 u “73^{3 “ w _ _ 

Scarat Pl No 7 . Photo , B-.J N? 6 , 

- (Z Locuii 4on -«t>N -3se on eilker side of S. chamber 

- AU boTs , Cxce(»E 58 h.£ Covered. . 

6301680-643 Wooden Carvo{Nt jars . 

- Gwl egg. 

58n 68 ° 79jkm Fragts. gold-plated'fish C.f Pl..XN,N* 3 • stTeks of wood. 

o3tp$iD 


35sterp5- r 


68079 k 


79ajk 


Fragfi. A Urooden Ct -nobic. (ars 

SlaFe knife (?) 

Worked limeste-ae -piga-re-f broken) — - 

Coffin empty. Canopic access on E.. of chamler 
See also N.K- registers -f»r inlvaded (rurial . 


39) 

394 - 

398 

399 - 


n.i Ct**X J 

501 M 


' f Large gmunTT sherds .one wvtti name ^NNy. I-ntraded ’Roman 

f Uunal in M Side of shaft - . Can»b«c aeeess E of ckt 2 Se. 301^,40 «. 
32,e 74jk’ n Nile Oyster shell. 

08 er Limestone eye. Cl old foil. I 

— -■ Heads N • Mans rody W. WovnenS tody £ . 

75jkm80^ - - - - 

73 f 3 J K Limes/onfe Aye.. Coyyber wire . 

~ ~ SrrtaJl offer/ng tatte . ^/age stick . 

79f 3 ( Flint' FfoJres . Riir /very dancing tocunds shafted, /the hands . Hed*joho<f(?> 
X 6v green, jkjc . Canonic -Hecess W. of S. Chamber. 
r&>c3 Two time stone eges . 

5 U. 9 I 4lt42t44<j ( 5oc 68p73l J t75ljifri ScnxoM- Pi_^5T N6 94-■ 

- Scarab Pi-^.N9yq. 

M. c , gii^r^rr 

73(-5*n79jAmSane pin 
5muyu> 5ofb 79 jkm 1 

8og 85evL^zls f 

24-«32u>3‘8l4l 3 |>v 47 j 3 'of 68 er 7 ott 73 km Bead s over forehead ^ under ckm ? 

79jk"> 80.1- “85v 92cl _ J 

44j Wond frog Sceral Pl KX N9 72 .. 

3Sfo 47j 68P 7 0a -7 5w< l#'79K, Pot mouLks Pv gr.Kov38.a9. Ft •ntr knife . 

SoM-o-ir- FL^Nsyt. 

5o 41. X 42h. 44ck 5pf S8t6?o73k 79j fragts. Iirowre Spoon. CWte. hawk'headed Leact 
34m 68 fs 79jkm CyL of-S«n.u.sert fj. ( Pl ^ } TV? 14 . 







HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. MIDDLE KINGDOM. 


LXII. 


N- 


530 

532. 

533 

534 
|539 

540 

541 

543 

544 
545* 
54-6 
547 
5491 
SJTil 
555 
583 
606 
603.I 
603 
6o4| 
605 
|6o6 
60s 

ii 

609 

610 

| 6 i f 

612 

h 

613 
6/4 
615 

6l<e>| 

61 g 

62.0 

U 

621 

622 

623 

624 ! 

626 

63.7 

62s 

640 

& 


S 

Wl 

Wl 

wl 

w£| 

Wt 

S 

S 


M-M 


IM 


644 

645 

646 
660 

II 

66 | 

II 

803 


MM 

MMF| 

M 


MM 


MM 


SM 3 F 1 


M 


n 


F 


COFFIN 


45 

Inscr-fogfe 


"Faces 
Frag Is 
Fragts finsc' 


CVvIleU 


SHAFT 

n • e d 


HOUSE 


45 90-165 

35 - 60 - 14-0 
28 80 155 
20-65-45 
35-105 -190 
95-185 
so- 100-270 


0132 


CHAMBER 

H - N • E 


RUl N 


7 's>40x: 


Traoes 


60 90 180 I 
4«''l/0 24ol 
40 • loo- 24 cj 

34- 7Z--2.‘0 

5o tfofto 
40 - 9 o 240I 
32 . lO' I^S 

|45"- 95- <65 
35 70 35" 
[ 40,90 140 

Htb-9 5 " 160 
40 80-65 
25- ?5- 65 

P o 

35- 95-165 
| 4 o * 5 -l 6 o 
32-79-100 


35- 90- 50 
40- So-3o 
if4o-80-55 

46 *o i 6 o| 
38* loo » 6 o 
30 85- SO 
30- 85- 5o 


45 50-135 
- 85 85 

40 * 28-80 

45 50-85 
4 o 80 - 120 , 
50-4ZI0SI 

455590 

50 40:120 

65 - 40-105 
40-50 So 

45-50-80 
50 95105 
4 P- 28-80 

(inner) 

40 -85 uo 
50 *6 86 

50 - 95-120 


T-E R.>f 
35 35-8 0 
55-120 12D| 


CHAMBER 

HM-E 


SEE 


45 - 45.90 

30-2.8 -70 


50 85-100 

40 <+0-75 
60.50-30 
50 80 95 
45- 80 - 85| 
48-100-100 


ME 

NS 

N 

S 

s 

w 

s 

|NS 

N 

|SN 

s 

ss 

MS 

MS 

IMS 


50-85- S5 
35- 46- 50 


DEPOSIT 

60 - 95-110 


5o-8o-8o 
4 o- no- iso 


Ins 

s 


MS 

NS 


P. OTTERY 

(Pls xxxnt - Xii) 


sect, 73. 


Pr«gt yohiaeLtch pot Pl^ | 


%-Z. 


41 i 

3So 4*9 grri'f 
7 j i 33i*»3tKl 1 43Tvv 
lOwi 43 C 


fy 

67 s 
, 70j 3 

6 ?sy 




56k 




3 olt 


2 . 0-3 ~ 


6 k 


5 L »-3 7ji‘ok 


7j-x 

2oo.34 3 5h 3?U 

7j* 36l 

7^2 1 °™ 

2. 0 .^ 0 .^ 41 m 

" 33t38o 

7 ° 36r 

7 ji 38 r 41 U 

7h 36li38o ? 

7i» Ipf 41c 


40cL 5 9 Vi - 
48"f 59 Ir* 67 s 

4 IC 

4l r« 67 s 


53 f 


67 s 

67s 

6 7y 


t 


67s 

S"6af 58k s o 
5 7 j 67 s 

50d_53nir 
58h t S9b 1 67S 

*7i z 7s 
SSc*.^ b7S 

6 ? S 88tr 

|7j • 

5 7 j 67s 


1 


5y 7jx 
Tn* 

5y yrxn 2 r lOm 

5rw *' 7 y* r 


4$t 


67 s 90 r| 

^ 7 j 6 7 l > 3 

6763 s 

Sham 5Ey (>jcze.. 

5<>l 

5-7j 


2 e, 


7ix 

4 tK 

5 

67 s 

7u- 

38nj 


67 s 

7 jxrii 



67 s 

67 s 


38t 


w. 


•» 

5 7j 

67 s 


9ap 


XVI? 


SenBP 


N<? 


STONE 


x\ 


pw? 


M 


So® 

dm® 


XV? 


IXNI? 


530 

532 

533 

534 
539 
54 o| 
*4/ 
543 
549 

545 

546 

547 

549 . 

5S2 

555| 

|583 

600 

[602 

6 0 3 

604 
60 s 
606 

608 

M 

609 
6rp 

611 

612 

M 

6 13 

614 

615 

616| 
618 

620 

II 

621 

i>%7. 

623 

624 

625 

626 

627 

62* 

640 

641 

642 


77 


45 


BEADS 

(pcs. l - im) 


Pu XXm j l3,Muuvor kancHe . 


32fc 


79jkm 
79j km 


644 I 

645 

696, 

660 

* 

66f 

11 

803 

804 


I 


( 2k5k^24vv32w3»fn4l d 4 » n47t-5o( 

l 6*u/7olx73k^ 3 ' 


Btu-c. y 
.marWC? 
KoWJ>orJ 

29 '64 
34-747S| 

43-55 


- ( 


ZGU*aX^| 

n.<urM«A 

koKI-poft) 


82 


5w 224 4»r44SX 68 uu 

“ *■* ‘ 

73m s ^p 3 

, 79j Vm o’ 0 fg 92l 
o 3 >\ 68 o 
68-o 

>5V9Zs 

643 to^Jt 

52g 616 6 g'frx j 

6 s-d- 

5z36k4| 64 almv44o4>w 58lbvf§2s 7 
6«fkS70cc373v,l:w 79jkty,8o«f 85t J 
, 73Wi79jkrn 

1 


REMARKS 


Pc Si •f 0 '- , Pc S Nos 4.5*13 for head.*sutsi 4 ra.fo. 

Frcxgtg Cyt;-rv4e.r ^vTm.«Jek, C.^. pL.^rg.2.. 0>^r mirror. Pi-SSh .IS 

Qold . 

Copper k-rvi^e- . F4nrvk f^ak« . 'ToLfryYicJ ^ra-jfs. jygry T>urfr jy» wri 


e-T 


Tm 9- 

sh«.ll . FI nrtk H«.k-e_ 


Scol-vouL PUXX N 2 90 . 


79fjkm*Oj?5n 
- - 192 cs 

6 *n 70 k 79 j 

28s 38C 42gr5oc" 73 ^^ 75/4 

7 on s%L 


79jk»» 32 .I 

Drop 3 ) 03 % ; WrrW Carw«liar> ; spherical 
aVot^e . fc-currel cljoJc. . 

7 °«- 803 92I 


Ss l2^ 44r 58z 680 73n. SOcmp 

_ _ ___ _ __ 85v 92gh»n 

5ck-7k-13j p -3 9 aip -*41 Kl • 42y • 44 givz.- 
68 L -/0 vy-73 fktj 0130^-76 4j ■ SOef - 8 SCj 
lot 73 I>t4 Yi 79 J km 80 m 8 Sr $U 

68 f 92 € 


Nile. OyS|"cr sh.el|. 

Itvscr. C^|nr»4e\' Servccsert"]!! ; .Pu.SS,N 8 17 ; Ctay seaJLw^ 9v 
L.rvbixke4. ^n.u.4 ctisk 

Bl<vek mW-irig sferie ; CoJ»pe.r Jtecsor, Small ScctraV. 

Fr'a-gts. Co ffin m V-Lierogl^pk h.icroChc . 

Sfa-tSce.ffe-.Pi- Xix.Ng I.Offen-n. 3 T&iil-e. Pu Xix,fV 9 2 

2 lithe-Sto-ne. €iges. < 0 old Tow.lr enX>y«.(w unite 

Airne-stB-rve. stairs . Co.^ opi c.’ recess W. a$- c.k.a.-rrvlrep 
Al<xWsler kecLdresk PL-.VUi,Ne IO. 'R-olrouWy 2E»dyna^R (Seet 32) 
Se.e oulso im.k . r'egtsters fen- iTrtlruuAedl lru.WaA . 

Ca.-nofjic vecess. on E of Sj CHotmber 2oe. Ol&n. 35"h. 

5 nva.ll Scooroir. 

s 47*- < v ,r c J»lou 4 !*.«_, Piu.^^ ,N* 86. 

2 . I mws tone. e.y es . 

Ver^y svwa.t( lotuJu.5 on W - N. Ch.am.kr c 6 n(a<mng diilds fcntsfr 
fivick geave. loi'IF f>o.- tv te4-archc 4 eoof. 

O^erinq+aMe. 1 -n.scr cgi$ of fl-*nen«Ynkeut<SL jP 4 ^ } N 2 ? 2 i ^32. 

Nik . Vn.Vred. trccriod 

WkecuF <x.t\4. trCa.nS m f^of? . 

2 flml' PlakcS - Efagh of- unirkeii 

Kohl stick . ^>*va.U. jlaje disk u/ifc knF&tgU 

HatmaiUI^, Nokl Stick . 

tMetaL kook. . t^Tick ttrch^ Sbri>vg oJL~ 3 S" , ffrm' kHinn.oixjxaf* 50 
Irnseri (reel Cm| *>J SenicSert 30. ; Pi_ . , n'o 19 . 

C^lmder of Rmenem koir JE- jPL.T^X , N? 32 

S , *-w 

Ittk-ts . Fro-gt" of TsU.- el -Aiaku.dt.iyek - 6 i«tok Lottery 
N.K. inFruetedL trM.ria.1 - ’ ' 

ScaraV pc. EX , N 987 -^* 04 . N . -face. E . fu.lt lengltt. 

Head, to N , face ToE . ai- fu-U- lenqttC . (s / 0 clottuLxoMykeeiatit. 

3 Secavcalr^ F»U XXl N9? 108-110 


| 7 Sca.ra.lrS. pi- wF~~ too - lofe. Copper Y<ay>r 






SHAFT CHAMBER CHAMBER | POTT ER Y 

X (Pl.S. XL-ll - XLv) 

M.K registers - 46o 

M-K. registers - 3 b 24y2.S4k Fmgt i-nvjtbJVoTv la.zuJU. bowls. 
- - 13a. 

M8oto ^aT ***** .** 

3S-45-95 45 75 <ZO SN 2a 36n. 8oj 

45-40 85 - S 2©f 32d 3fey3«c 65g 

45 ?5 30 - S 9S < 


49 B - 
.58 B - 
70 6 MF 

II 

72/ B 5M8F 
74 B - 
. 8 *. 0 - 
.90 B C M 

■9 f 6 M 
98 B 3M2F 
.13 S - 
>|6 B - 
42 B anzF 
49 

55 S F 
.60 B - 
63 B 7F6fi 
69 $ - 
*7 ‘ - 

■17 w - 
154 Nz - 

5 6 Nz - 

57 Hz 
r 64 N« 

Bl MH 


SEE 

SEE 

4-0 4-5-80 
40-80 160 

25 95 175 
4-o 75-iZS 
3o- 85 -160 

32 85-170 
27. 80 .140 
SEE 
SEE 

34- 80-180 
5o.8o-i65 
52 »5 .150 
40 • iao‘160 

35- 80 210 
5SE‘---; 

36- 85-220 
see 

35-80 220 
SEE 
SEE 


34/80- 65 


55 80 55 4-5 85-12,0 SN 2.4j 3l bfrv 

5o 80 80 - S 5r 205 23k 24 c 25 K 44 d 

M„. K. registers - 2 of 32g 

M. K. registers - 25j . 

60 -105-80 50-60-IOOMS 22 o 23g 24-U* 3 | m 

55-9Z-I05 - S 5y9fc Z3jZ4d25f 

• — - 2/51/ 

25-45 105 40-45-100 NS 3c 2 of> 23) 24 y 33w 36m 38c. 
registers - l3v 25o 

- - - 9 cl. 25k 

M.K., registers - 9 * 36w 

- - 3«.u.-z_ 23^24-cgf Many nru, 

M.K. registers - 5d-2ftf25k 


83j 95g 

36 m 

78cd 83m 96^ 

3lm 


|toie. Xvm 

xvm 



XVlil 

Early xvm 
Early xvifi 

flmferJf X 
Early xww 

Early xvm 

Sti_ 

Early xvni 



8 vm _ 

Many mud f ots . Fragt" Stone'canoJ>ic. jar TUolRiy 


isters - 5r 23 X 


83lr 931 


Car ly iSHii 
Will 

mi 
tfam.I 
>tiX 


82 nh 
84 Nh 
*5 WH 
86 

'88 NH 
90 NH 
54 
9* 

'98 
ov 
»o 8 

>lO 
2 , 1 ,- 
32 Nz M 
■37 ID - 



45-75-185 

$E& 

SEE 

SEe 

30 - 60-57 


45-100-118 55-95*125 
M, K. registers 
M. K. registers 

M . K. registers 


r*l • K / registers 


65 - 65 -75 
65-80-65 
40 - 80 - 80 
45 «0S -85 
45-80-55 
45- 80-80 


by 2o)> 


23K261r 
20f j> 24 -y 36 X 

25g 54g 

36m 39 n. 52 . 6 . 


4t 5w 9 die 24r3ln4bj - 


78 cL 87 a. 

8 I 0 


32 e 92 k 


3t 38a. Qlaze. fc lr-a.lL Pu.XI_V 

Qlaj^e: cli.sk PL.XLV 

TJOf j 

2d§ 7«dL 83d.ef 

(Model oeff.tr axe) 35m 38g 0laze J>ot #- desk Pl, 

33g ' 7 «k 

23 e 80rv 


24fL 

24L 

244 

5s 

5yl2b 


m _ 

E curly X'/m 

Early SS 



lAnten^IC 

mjr) 

Loti Mi 


i9(TL Sym 


TUolK.IL 
Early xviii 
Early xW 


j Early Xviii 


9llgi«v iKVIll 


Wm tody 

Xvmi 


95tn Xviii 

Early Mi 


HARAGEH. TOMB REGISTERS. NEW KINGDOM. 


N- STONE 

K -xga 


B EADS 

(Pl. lTv ^ 


R E MARKS 


S3£& I 

KoWjwtl 


I " I — — — 4 k/oaden. 'usKalitiM.’ 'Burial inlfydeilL nvXlldyasKa^t 

— — — 1-nlrudecL 're N. Ckoxvlier. 

— — SkerdL uiilU. owiurt -mark Pl XU . NS 3 | 

'Re-u.sad XI l skaf-fc 

— - — 9ca.ru.lr ..a Pl. XXI N 2 |62 

26 c 39t 42,6-476585- 73o79g85st Foreign.(?) botr in ^om of -flsk (?) Pl^L tV9 CO. Frail's of- 

j_ ivory box. Piece of roj>«-. Dom fruuF. FUagls of coffin. Aid., 

— 541 79° 80d Scarair Am.ekket 4 .J 3 I, Pl. Xkl N9 125 iTdfudtd irr. Xlf^Shaft 

98B — — FraujIs of nascribeol Coffin and moi,ftrng. 

— - — Irdruud&cL. 

• a ■ ' — — — — ~ 

21 - 30 - 4 9-5|-67 - 8^douJ/t^uJ. if Same periodL) Af>e J>lagu.e. Sc Sea_raJ» Pl. XXINSI23^l XX Ns 88 . Ivory Reedies 
_ t*_ Y *■ “5 — Frrxgts cf glaze- fijure.. Ffaj 3 mLh.ll of Ongiru 4 ^^bun'ai. ' 

3j 74o . _ 

88 - — — Face m (nr».estong,Pi, XXI I.N -3. iPode. u_n.ce.rfa..n.; 


101 

107 fikoTvZje f>\n.. S5j 63o 


109 2 Sistrum anultTs, Head of j 

73 3. 

42e 73 a.t 32 I 


$$ i <5u- >9l>j(s 22t 29l 39a<Jv42C44y^479 6 eU. 
w 73gf»479bj--'n 

- IXxa.t eye. ftrorvee figure of AMEN 
96 DaJS, of groaf arvcurtaiTv J>rolradly rnj xed.. 

91 08 a. 86 u- 

58h 73 c 8 Sfc 

ZUjIraster l — — — 

iToW bot J 

9S'VQZ ~ ~ ~ 


IrUrw-ol edL . 

ftnck Coffin. 8-0 N. as.fi, ZfiH. 

Scarajbs Pl )W_N«S 144,145 7(34 

ScajmJroid. Pu .XXI N9J43 J t-n.scr-ilitd. green, pottery rinj Px.XSI/V 8 
Inff adeaL 

Scarair Pl2S N 2 218; T*Uc u at PU-Jfp, NS 219 [igg, 

Scax-ab- of Kkn-vessu. I Pi- XXI , N- I.T9.Sc.a_r-a. 6 - PL. yixT lV° 
Scaradr Pl. XXI NO 190 Bronze. Lza t. 

JSCarats FL Xkl , 226-228 , 0laz.e SeaX 4c u.za.t, 

4 5ca-raks PL 2£t N“? 178-181 , Olaze ' U. 5 aut-S 

I3scamts 3r Scara-tOid-S pL xg N«S ISO - IOO 
Do at/a kofJ jtot, fcok/ S/tdA 

Scarab Pl ^<T N? 204 F.sk*- BES J>lag.u.e Pl^J 205, 
Bronze rings covered m gold -foil . 

Bone kokl stick , glaze balls, Ivory Stn'f>S , nats . 


10 J«ln>cst( 


93 

664 ! 9 a 
665 I ■ 
666 
667 1 S7 
6681 - 

669 

670 103 


Cornelian, amaWCgst 'Sc glaze . 

Cfla.ze oeaJL } u-Zair , ri-rvg. 

5 1 9 >nl 3 o I 94 VW 42>j 44° TWfj-rn 85a 
5s I3K 22 c 39 K 74 .k 79 j-m 85a 

73 k 8 'Ob 
5c 15s >9^32x1390 44 3 73**- 8od 

glaze 8c gold fisk ,U<udcs, Won, Ik 

3 a. 41 f 44 dl 47 n 73 m 79 dls 80 bQ 5 rLt 66 w 92 j 

gtk 44v 55d S8b63)73j 85a 87c 92s 
Gold (uiuddj tf irkols ( Some 'Roman., 
in ftUing of grave 
Cornelian , Small gold, lazdl l/jnin. ^laxe 
Small gotd) 


l9o39e 44m 58k74tf 80 b 8 Sd- 87f 92s 

-X Only 36 in NK. rea 


33caraJrs Pl. . N “ >85-187. 

Scarair Pl XXI N 2 127 lnirw-4 ed. bcorioX . 

lntr>.vdeiA bieriaJL 
liilrudcd lru.rioJL 

Ibt ,tyj>e 31 n iS.in ttvis bvcrial lo 1 TITo uiF dccorcCtTcm.. 
RSoagk Sea .raJroidS Pl. XXI j N°* 224| 225. 

Sca.v-a .6 Pi_SS N?Z 20 ;Figa.re of-Battel', U-T^al" eyes , 

Scarabs Pk Nfi? 200-202 

TLro Irene da.nc.nrvg wanols * karvil-skaf>ed-/XI( ./ 
4 Scarabs Sc Sca-raJboiols PL XXJ , N°3 129-132 
2 Scaralreiols . 'PlXXI NSl 5 g-. 

2 ScoL.rn.bs Pl. 22T , 1 40, 14!. 

3 Aaiagk scarabs . Mijced ~Xi7 t< N K- bu-riab . 

foltery coffin , S' scarabs He- 3 Cxvrxvlrr)'ks P ujoll NS? 113-120 
'Rirt of lircrLy clrvilds O) bracelet 

Z Scarats Pl. ^1 N2S 183,184. 

7 Scarabs ,(5 shewn) P 4 SJ , Ng* 170 - 174 
5Cara_b Pl. Vy.1 k2 > 76 . 0reen glaze disk 

Scarab Pl SI >77- 

2 Scarabs , 2 9«a.ra.ljoids Pl XXI , Nfi? l 66—169 
0 old K«Wt AlT\g , 


isttn. 





























































































1:5 HARAGEH. INSCRIPTIONS, ETC., FROM COFFINS BEFORE THE MIDDLE KINGDOM. LXV. 



ll'r ^ 

TL‘- 

ij. ; € I’Ll r f Aj_* 

>2?f *=>/ HUP 








2:7 


HARAGEH. TOMB 87. NO NAME. BEFORE XII DYN. 


LXVI. 











































HARAGEH. TOMB OF UKHT-HETEP, 671, 672 


SOUTH END 


IMMMfiMMBMH: 


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in 


a t>( ■SJ® 

^ f I 


i- * 

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= Til'Ll 


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? M A ^ | (JJI 

•III. , ***** • '' 




t <r =1 


5lsT7?l w T i siimciii 

'If B L® iijl w 5 k4Hi I r*r i"^ul 

t*£l2 4 S 44 T& 4f? 2 ill 


5 4E 


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✓ 

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TJ1 

5 b 

























































—1 /A* 

*/j 

_i 

_1 

_J 

_S 

_t 

^ A 


i 

i 

A 

A 

A 

f r/ 

*A% 

J# 1 “W 

j 

£ 
.—v 

1 

* 

#4 

l 

1 

-J- 

-5^ 1 

<o 

C2 

1 

*4* 

<S7 i 

i 

■sr 

-as- 

41 

//x “ 


1 

X 

'T-' 

i 

4 


? |y 

4 

j». 

K l 

PN 

Vl 

V 

\ U 

t 

*“X 


<3n. -r 

^ i 


4 L 1 

q?_ 


















































LX IX, 





































1 : lO 


HARAGEH. TOMB 250. COFFIN OF SENUSERT-ONKH. 




BAND ALONG MIDDLE OF COFFIN-LID 



EAST SIDE 


SOUTH END 




































HARAGEH. STELE OF NEB-PU. TOMB 41. 






V)=~.=UmSiUHVlT£^ 




ctErcii+ 


$■ ILA 




mm ii?; 




<rlt 



































HARAGEH. STELES OF NEB-PU, HER-EM*HEB, AND KHENT-KHETI-EM-SAF-SENB. 


LXXII. 






TbSg U-TtrirA Z+ 










mi'M 






wTBr'TiTTMmfi 


SLTiMffiMISf tv 

BiramcsiLp^ 


VERSO 













































HARAGEH. 


STELE OF IT-NE-NEB-TEN 







































HARAGEH. INSCRIPTIONS OF SENENY, KENEMSU AND SERUKET. 


LXXIV. 



















+KE O^ETUJ 



rnNfvxm 



fe !&!&&. 

K oii*i Fpftjj& 
*& ■' 










HARAGEH. INSCRIPTIONS FROM COFFINS, ETC. 


LXXVII. 


1 

3. 


M 

2£- 
a —0 

0 

"Y 

4 


I W 

V 

[■C 

r 

17 

Pi 


1. FROM THfc COFFIN OF THAU. 87 


' HIP ° tS f i- 



2 .FROM THC COFFINS OF ITI. 87 


o 

000 

-o 

fed 

o 


o 

I I I 



rf 


~k 

* 

o 


6. FROM POTTCRY COFFIN. GHORAB 






STM if 

3.FROM THE COFFINS OF IRYNES. 151 


F=^ 


u\ 1 ^ 

7. FROM TOP OF BOX-COFFIN. 173 



U 


Li 


B.G 








HARAGEH. 


RELIGIOUS TEXT ON A FUNERARY POT (A) 


LXXVIli. 














2:3 


HARAGEH. RELIGIOUS TEXT ON A FUNERARY POT (B) 


LXXIX. 




NOT€S. 

1. UNUSUAL FORM; HARDLY 
Z. CF. MQLL€R, HI€RAT PALAO& ..I ANHANG. 
N? IX, "MATH." “W£STCAR. n 











LXXX. 


HARAGEH. MARKS AND INSCRIPTIONS ON TOWN POTTERY. 






HARAGEH. INDEX OF NAMES AND TITLES. 


LXXXI. 


NAM0S 


iyamc 

h /**•*■«* 


raoow- 




sex PLAie 

F LXXIII 
M LXXII ( 3,^ 
F LXIV.2 
F LXXII,3, R. 
F LXXII,3,R 
F UXXI 
F LXXIII 
? LXXIV.l 


4i5i» M LXV.l 


P 

■4-4 

s t'TZ> 

fa* 

Va/tx M 

i/fc Jn* ^ [ w J 

84 

Sr-^4 

o| 

?°V 


* 


.■®T 

•in 


!fn 


□@4 

mf 


I 0! 

PI 


M VIII, 6; LXXVI /, 3 
M LXV,1;LXXVII,2 
M LXXV.l 
F LXXI 
F L XVII 
M LXXX.2 
M LXXI 
M LXV.3 
M LXX! 

M LXXII, 1 
M LXV.i 
M LXXIII;LXXV,5 
M LXXI 
F LXXII,3,R. 

F LXXII,2 
M LXXVII.S 
M LXVIli 
F LXXV(I,4- 
F LXXIII 
M LXXI 
M LXXI 1,3, R„V. 

F LXV,2 
M LXXII, 3,R. 

M LXX 
M LXXII,3,V. 

M LXXV,4* 

M LXXI 

i M LXXII,3.R 


NAME 

sex PLATC 

PT^ 

M LXXX,2 

PT— 

M LXXI 

PT-P 

F LXXV,2,3 

P&44 

M LXXI; LXXIV.2 

P*T 

F LXXIV,3,4- 

HI* 

M XIX,1 


M LXXIV.3,4 

■im 

F LXXVl,l 


M LXXVII.1 

fe44s£ 

• j 

M LXXVI.l 

?7*r*o " 

? LXXVII.6 

H.Sv^ 

M LXXV, 5 


M LXXV.5 

CMtlf 

M LXXVI.4 

$IBAMOYN 

M LXXV 1,2 


loij3^tM-M-MV) M LXXVI,3 


TITLCS 


TITLE 

HOLD€R 

PLATE 

‘Uizz 

ATI Ar«~~y 

■55. 

LXXI 

%n 

M 

LXXII,3,V. 

ffirpF 



As 

□®4 

LXXII, 3, R. 

Sj? 

LXXI 



LXXI 

ilL Aww\ 

4k&#« 

LXXII, 3,R. 


PT 

LXXI 


4&&f*r 

LXXII, 3,R. 



X1X,1 

Jft 

m T 

LXXV, 5 

Vl 13 • 

+ 0? I 

LXXV, 4 


84 

LXXI 

m 

4-4 

LXXV 11,2 


^4 

LXV, 3 


TITLE 

HOLDER 

PLATE 

b\ 

4-4 

LX V,1 


^•~4 

LXV, 3 



LXXVIl.l 


imai 


(1 J) LXXIIAR..K 

%" 


LXXI 


A O A«*vv\ 

lA'sSP 

LXXIII 


4k>044- 

LX IV, 2 


\°u 

LXXII, 3, R 



LXXI 1,2 


PT-P 

LX XV,2,3. 


PTT 

L XXIV,3,4 


&44 

LX XVI, 1 

% 

mmzn 

LXXII,3,R. 

j® 

a—fl 

yy 

■n 

?r& 

i#!gm 

LXV, 1 

70 

4)144—P 

L XXVI 1,3 


4“ 4 

LXV,l;LXXVI(,2 


^^4 

LXV.3 



LXXVII.S 



LXXVIl.l 


PT- 

LXXI 

ri 

4H44-P 

T6XTT0 LXXVII.3 


ijn 

LXXVII.4 

10144 

0? 

LXXI 



L XXIV, 3,4 

M 

^24 

LXV,3 

Pfrl 

4H44H 1 

LXXVH.3 


4“4 

LXV,1;LXXVIU 


t**SW& 

LXV,1 



LXXVII.5 


ttffiMtrr 

LXXII,3,R. 



LXXVIl.l 

*»>M MftBkatrr 

LXX|i,3,R,V. 

MTAv 

$IBAJU0YN 

LX XV 1,2 


fiuxKfoyos) <3 ?oiJ3^m-Mwv) lxxvi. 3 
LOCTp(og) 4>Olj3p(.ja,LLWV) LXXVI.3 


B.G. 


* R.-RECTO, y=VERSO. 




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